Gabriel Kerneis

Gabriel Kerneis
ANSSI · Hardware and Software Lab

Phd

About

9
Publications
565
Reads
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72
Citations
Citations since 2016
0 Research Items
57 Citations
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we introduce Continuation Passing C (CPC), a programming language for concurrent systems in which native and cooperative threads are unified and presented to the programmer as a single abstraction. The CPC compiler uses a compilation technique, based on the CPS transform, that yields efficient code and an extremely lightweight repres...
Article
Full-text available
Threads are a convenient and modular abstraction for writing concurrent programs, but often fairly expensive. The standard alternative to threads, event-loop programming, allows much lighter units of concurrency, but leads to code that is difficult to write and even harder to understand. Continuation Passing C (CPC) is a translator that converts a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Coroutines and events are two common abstractions for writing concurrent programs. Because coroutines are often more convenient, but events more portable and efficient, it is natural to want to translate the former into the latter. CPC is such a source-to-source translator for C programs, based on a partial conversion into continuation-passing styl...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Weakly consistent multiprocessors such as ARM and IBM POWER have been with us for decades, but their subtle programmer-visible concurrency behaviour remains challenging, both to implement and to use; the traditional architecture documentation, with its mix of prose and pseudocode, leaves much unclear. In this paper we show how a precise architectur...
Thesis
Full-text available
Most computer programs are concurrent ones: they need to perform several tasks at the same time. Threads and events are two common techniques to implement concurrency. Events are generally more lightweight and efficient than threads, but also more difficult to use. Additionally, they are often not powerful enough; it is then necessary to write hybr...
Article
Full-text available
Threads and events are two common abstractions for writing concurrent programs. Because threads are often more convenient, but events more efficient, it is natural to want to translate the former into the latter. However, whereas there are many different event-driven styles, existing translators often apply ad-hoc rules which do not reflect this di...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This paper is a companion technical report to the article "Continuation-Passing C: from threads to events through continuations". It contains the complete version of the proofs of correctness of lambda-lifting and CPS-conversion presented in the article.
Article
Full-text available
We compare a set of web servers on a simple synthetic workload. We show that, on this particular bench-mark, event-driven code is as fast or faster than the fastest implementations using thread libraries.

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