G. Morelli

G. Morelli
Boston College, USA | BC · Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology Department

Ph.D.

About

56
Publications
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2,622
Citations

Publications

Publications (56)
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the ecosocial basis of prosociality as reflected in early food-sharing behaviors of children in traditional hunter-gatherer and subsistence farming communities. The body of work on children’s prosociality focuses predominantly on processes investigated in families with Western lifestyles (e.g., urban, middle-class), who are over...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the parent intervention program evaluated by Weber et al. (2017) and argues that there are scientific and ethical problems with such intervention efforts in applied developmental science. Scientifically, these programs rely on data from a small and narrow sample of the world's population; assume the existence of fixed developm...
Article
Full-text available
This article considers claims of Mesman et al. (2017) that sensitive responsiveness as defined by Ainsworth, while not uniformly expressed across cultural contexts, is universal. Evidence presented demonstrates that none of the components of sensitive responsiveness (i.e., which partner takes the lead, whose point of view is primary , and the turn-...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the parent intervention program evaluated by Weber, Fernald and Diop (2017), and argues that there are scientific and ethical problems with such intervention efforts in applied developmental science. Scientifically, these programs: rely on data from a small and narrow sample of the world’s population; assume the existence of fix...
Preprint
Full-text available
This paper explores ethical issues raised by parenting interventions implemented in communities in low- to middle-income countries (LMICs) with rural, subsistence lifestyles. Many of these interventions foster “positive parenting practices" to improve children’s chances of fulfilling their developmental potential. The practices are derived from att...
Chapter
Full-text available
Attachment theory has its roots in an ethnocentric complex of ideas, longstanding in the United States, under the rubric of “intensive mothering.” Among these various approaches and programs, attachment theory has had an inordinate and wide-ranging influence on a wide range these four of professions concerned with children: family therapy, educatio...
Chapter
Full-text available
Attachment theory has its roots in an ethnocentric complex of ideas, longstanding in the United States, under the rubric of "intensive mothering." Among these various approaches and programs, attachment theory has had an inordinate influence on a wide range of professions concerned with children (family therapy, education, the legal system, and pub...
Chapter
Full-text available
When our colleagues and I (Morelli) wrote about the cultural nature of psychology’s most influential theory of relatedness in 2000, we did so in the hope of a rapprochement with theorists wedded to a more universalistic view of attachment (Rothbaum et al. 2000). We questioned the key tenets of sensitive parenting, secure base, and child competency...
Article
Full-text available
Hunted wild animals (i.e., bushmeat) are a main source of protein for many rural populations in the tropics, and the unsustainable harvest of these animals puts both human food security and ecosystem functioning at risk. To understand the correlates of bushmeat consumption, we surveyed 1219 households in 121 rural villages near three newly establis...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the role that protected areas play in the livelihood security of local communities is essential to ensure that local people are not left shouldering the costs of what is a public good, and to help maintain robust local and national constituencies for biodiversity conservation. To provide baseline data for a longitudinal study on the e...
Article
The chapter discusses similarities and differences in attachment relationships across cultures. They propose that cultural differences in attachment relate to cultural differences in learning and coping. In European American communities, where the attachment relationship is experienced as a base for exploring and analyzing the world, children who a...
Article
This article reviews cultural differences in the extent of segregation of children from community life and their integration with people of differing ages, focusing especially on children's engagement with older children or similar-age children. We highlight cultural differences in children's everyday companionship with older children and with peer...
Article
We used empirical data to simulate the impacts, over the next 40 years, of subsistence-level agricultural clearing and bushmeat consumption on forest resources within the recently established Okapi Wildlife Reserve in northeastern Zaire. Satellite imagery, human population census data, and field measurements were used to calculate Present and proje...
Article
Past research comparing fostered and nonfostered children's welfare in sub-Saharan Africa has led to inconsistent results. One reason for this disparity might be that children's experiences are shaped more by the circumstances in which they are fostered than by merely being raised away from their parents. This article examines how fostered children...
Article
In this chapter we examine traditional accounts of attachment relationships and self-regulation in infancy and early childhood, as well as the experiences that foster their healthy development. Of primary interest is whether personal qualities such as autonomy and internal cohesion are important to the development of these psychological processes i...
Article
The study reported describes Efe (pygmy) forager one-, two-, and three-year-olds' involvement with males. The Efe of northeastern Zaïre were chosen because their social organization allows us to examine hypotheses based on studies in Western, technologically complex societies about the distinctive role fathers play in the lives of their young child...
Article
Ethnographic literature indicates that in many cultural communities around the world, children have extensive opportunities to learn through observing and participating in their community’s work and other mature activities. We argue that in communities in which children are often segregated from adult work (as in middle-class European American comm...
Article
Replies to comments by 7 authors (see records 2001-18772-008, 2001-18772-009, 2001-18772-010, 2001-18772-011, and 2001-18772-012) in reference to the F. Rothbaum et al's original article (see record 2000-02781-001), which highlighted evidence of cultural variations in, and noted ways in which attachment theory is laden with Western values and...
Article
Road density is closely linked to market accessibility, economic growth, natural resource exploitation, habitat fragmentation, deforestation, and the disappearance of wildlands and wildlife. Research in the Republic of Congo shows that roads established and maintained by logging concessions intensify bushmeat hunting by providing hunters greater ac...
Article
Road density is closely linked to market accessibility, economic growth, natural resource exploitation, habitat fragmentation, deforestation, and the disappearance of wildlands and wildlife. Research in the Republic of Congo shows that roads established and maintained by logging concessions intensify bushmeat hunting by providing hunters greater ac...
Article
Attachment theorists maintain that cultural differences are relatively minor, and they focus on universals. Here the authors highlight evidence of cultural variations and note ways in which attachment theory is laden with Western values and meaning. Comparisons of the United States and Japan highlight the cultural relativity of 3 core hypotheses of...
Article
This study examined cultural differences in the expression and meaning of physical closeness. Findings indicated that immigrant-Chinese parents, as compared with Euro-American parents, sleep in closer proximity with their children; more often view independence as children growing with the family; are more likely to emphasize the family unit; and pl...
Article
Over 20 million forest farmers practice slash and burn agriculture in the forests of the Congo Basin (Bahuchet and de Maret, 1995. State of Indigenous Populations Living in Rainforest Areas, European Commission DG XI Environment, Brussels). They rely on the long dry season (December–February north of the equator) to ensure that their new fields, cl...
Article
Projected rates of agricultural clearing in the Ituri Forest of north-eastern Democratic Republic of Congo range from 0 to 0.1 per cent per year and suggest that deforestation for subsistence agriculture is not an immediate threat to the integrity of the Okapi Wildlife Reserve (OWR). If the human population continues to grow at over 3 per cent per...
Article
Full-text available
Examines the decisions of middle-class US and Highland Mayan parents regarding sleeping arrangements during their child's 1st 2 yrs and their explanations for their differing practices. All 14 Mayan children slept in their mothers' beds into toddlerhood. None of the 18 US infants slept in bed with their mothers on a regular basis as newborns, altho...
Article
Full-text available
Extends previous observations on the multiple caretaking system of newborns and young infants among the Efe foragers of Zaire, to Efe infants and toddlers, whose social contacts with mother, father, adults, and children at 5 and 8 mo and at 1, 2, and 3 yrs were observed naturalistically. The Efe infant experiences a pattern of simultaneous and mult...
Article
This study extends previous observations on the multiple caretaking system of newborns and young infants among the Efe foragers of Zaire, to Efe infants and toddlers, whose social contacts with mother, father, adults, and children at 5 and 8 months and at 1, 2, and 3 years were observed naturalistically. The Efe infant experiences a pattern of simu...
Article
This article summarizes how cultural research can inform mainstream psychology. It focuses on an organizing theme that has been explored in research in non-Western groups: the role of specific cultural practices in organizing human endeavors. This perspective has influenced the direction of mainstream research, encouraging the advancement of our id...
Article
The purpose of this section of this special issue of the American Psychologist is to explore culture as it touches on issues of importance to American children, including learning, education, intellectual skills, language development, and family constellations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Chapter
The perinatal practices of the Efe (Pygmies) of Northeastern Zaire are described and considered in terms of their relationship to models of human behavior. Efe practices are more consistent with the view that development occurs through the mutual regulation of behavioral strategies by parent and child than with a species prototypical bonding model....
Article
Two models of the human infant's caretaking requirements—the continuous care and contact model and the caretaker-child strategy model—are discussed in terms of the caretaking practices observed among the Efe (Pygmies) of northeastern Zaire. The Efe1 engage in a system of multiple care which begins at birth and continues through at least the first 1...
Article
Typescript. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 1987. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 196-201). " ... authorized facsimile, made from the microfilm master copy of the original ... published by UMI." Photocopy.

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Projects (3)
Project
All children aren't created equal, nor are all children's lives and experiences interchangeable. In this work, I explore the local contexts that make a difference in children's daily experiences and long-term opportunities alike.