G. S. Faria

G. S. Faria
University of St Andrews · School of Biology

PhD Student

About

25
Publications
2,308
Reads
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154
Citations
Additional affiliations
November 2015 - present
University of St Andrews
Position
  • PhD Student
June 2013 - September 2015
University of Lisbon
Position
  • Master's Student
Education
October 2015 - October 2019
University of St Andrews
Field of study
  • Theoretical Population Genetics
September 2012 - October 2014
Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon
Field of study
  • Evolutionary and Developmental Biology
September 2009 - June 2012
Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon
Field of study
  • Evolutionary and Developmental Biology

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Full-text available
Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in the overlap between kin selection and sexual selection, particularly concerning how kin selection can put the brakes on harmful sexual conflict. However, there remains a significant disconnect between theory and empirical research. Whilst empirical work has focused on kin-discriminating behaviour,...
Article
Genetic relatedness is a key driver of the evolution of cooperation. One mechanism that may ensure social partners are genetically related is kin discrimination, in which individuals are able to distinguish kin from non-kin and adjust their behaviour accordingly. However, the impact of kin discrimination upon the overall level of cooperation remain...
Article
Experimental evolution is a powerful tool to understand the adaptive potential of populations under environmental change. Here, we study the importance of the historical genetic background in the outcome of evolution at the genome-wide level. Using the natural clinal variation of Drosophila subobscura, we sampled populations from two contrasting la...
Article
Full-text available
Sleep appears to be essential for most animals, including humans. Accordingly, individuals who sacrifice sleep are expected to incur costs and so should only be evolutionarily favoured to do this when these costs are offset by other benefits. For instance, a social group might benefit from having some level of wakefulness during the sleeping period...
Article
Full-text available
Recent years have seen a growing interest in the overlap between the theories of kin selection and sexual selection. One potential overlap is with regards to whether R. A. Fisher's “sexy‐son” hypothesis, concerning the evolution of extravagant sexual ornamentation, may be framed in terms of W. D. Hamilton's greenbeard effect, concerning scenarios i...
Article
Full-text available
Experimental evolution is a powerful tool to understand the adaptive potential of populations under environmental change. Here, we study the importance of the historical genetic background in the outcome of evolution at the genome-wide level. Using the natural clinal variation of Drosophila subobscura, we sampled populations from two contrasting la...
Article
Full-text available
The relative impact of selection, chance and history will determine the predictability of evolution. There is a lack of empirical research on this subject, particularly in sexual organisms. Here we use experimental evolution to test the predictability of evolution. We analyse the real-Time evolution of Drosophila subobscura populations derived from...
Data
Figure S1. Intragenomic conflict over male harm in the absence of female resistance. Figure S2. Cyclical coevolutionary dynamics of male harm y and female resistance x. Figure S3. Absence of genomic imprinting for female resistance traits. Figure S4. Absence of clear genomic imprinting with respect to female resistance in coevolution with male h...
Article
Full-text available
Recent years have seen a surge of interest in linking the theories of kin selection and sexual selection. In particular, there is a growing appreciation that kin selection, arising through demographic factors such as sex-biased dispersal, may modulate sexual conflicts, including in the context of male-female arms races characterized by coevolutiona...
Article
Full-text available
Phenotypic plasticity may allow species to cope with environmental variation. The study of thermal plasticity and its evolution helps understanding how populations respond to variation in temperature. In the context of climate change, it is essential to realize the impact of historical differences in the ability of populations to exhibit a plastic...
Article
Full-text available
There is growing interest in resolving the curious disconnect between the fields of kin selection and sexual selection. Rankin's (2011, J Evol Biol 24, 71-81) theoretical study of the impact of kin selection on the evolution of sexual conflict in viscous populations has been particularly valuable in stimulating empirical research in this area. An i...
Article
Full-text available
Ever since Darwin, understanding evolutionary processes and patterns have been major scientific quests. In the Origin of Species, Darwin explained both adaptation and diversity, and most of his arguments were based on indirect evidence, including comparative approaches. These findings led Darwin to defend that evolution in nature is extremely slow...
Article
Full-text available
Chromosomal inversions are present in a wide range of animals and plants, having an important role in adaptation and speciation. Although empirical evidence of their adaptive value is abundant, the role of different processes underlying evolution of chromosomal polymorphisms is not fully understood. History and selection are likely to shape inversi...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
How much is evolution predictable is a fundamental question, both in evolutionary biology terms and in general. The three main sources of evolution - the 'deterministic' action of natural selection (selection), the 'historical constraints' of the genetic background (history) and the 'stochastic' effects of chance events (founder events and drift), as well as their complex interactions dictate the outcomes of adaptive evolution. Using the lab as novel environment, experimental evolution as tool and Drosophila subobscura populations from contrasting european latitudes as model organisms we are analysing the roles of history, chance and selection as populations adapt to a common, novel environment (the lab) since introduction from wild collections. The comparison of the evolutionary trajectories and outcomes of populations of two independent collections, three years apart, allow to test for the repeatability and predictability of evolution. We have done so at the phenotypic and karyotypic level (Simões et al. Scientific Reports 2017) and we are now addressing how predictable is evolution at the genome-wide level. More soon...
Project
The main focus of our team is to understand Adaptive Evolution across biological levels, from phenotypes to karyotypes to genomes. We use mainly as tool Experimental Evolution, Drosophila subobscura as model organism and lab adaptation as selective force driving evolution. Since 2010 we are interested in understanding the relative roles of History, Chance and Selection during adaptation to the lab of populations founded from contrasting european latitudes. These populations are initially quite differentiated, both in life-history traits (eg fecundity), physiological traits (resistance to stress), body size, karyotypes (frequencies of inversions) and genome wide (SNPs in the thousands). How will they evolve in a common environment? We found that populations converge fast at the phenotypic level (Fragata et al. PLoS One 2014; Evolution 2016) but do so using different genetic pathways, both at the inversions level (Fragata et al. J. Evol. Biol. 2014, Simões et al. J. Evol. Biol. 2015) and genome-wide (Seabra et al. 2018). We are now analysing how predictable evolution is across biological levels, analysing more populations founded from the same locations three years later. More soon...