Frederique Viard

Frederique Viard
Université de Montpellier | UM1 · Institut des Sciences de l’Évolution Montpellier (ISEM)

PhD

About

293
Publications
50,470
Reads
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7,563
Citations
Citations since 2017
80 Research Items
3509 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500600
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500600
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500600
Additional affiliations
September 2020 - present
Université de Montpellier
Position
  • Managing Director
January 2000 - August 2020
Station Biologique de Roscoff
Position
  • Researcher
October 1997 - January 2000
Université de Lille
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (293)
Preprint
Species introductions promote secondary contacts between taxa with long histories of allopatric divergence. Anthropogenic contact zones thus offer valuable contrasts to speciation studies in natural systems where past spatial isolations may have been brief or intermittent. Investigations of anthropogenic hybridization are rare for marine animals, w...
Article
Full-text available
High-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies offer new promise to support surveillance programs targeting marine non-indigenous species (NIS). Metabarcoding might surpass traditional monitoring methods, for example through its ability to detect rare species, a key feature in early detection of NIS. Another interest of this approach is the identifi...
Article
Full-text available
Biological invasions are occurring at increasing rates since the onset of the twentieth century. While ports and marinas have been identified as a major point-of-entry for the spread of marine non-indigenous species (NIS), their relationships with wild habitats however needs further scrutiny. We had the rare opportunity to monitor the real-time col...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Biological invasions and changes in land and sea use are among the five major causes of global biodiversity decline. Shipping and ocean sprawl (multiplication of artificial structures at the expense of natural habitats) are considered as the major forces responsible for marine invasions and biotic homogenization. And yet, there is little evide...
Article
Full-text available
Molecular tools have been extensively used in recent decades to examine biological invasion processes, and are increasingly being adopted as efficient tools to support non-indigenous species surveys, notably through barcoding approaches, i.e., the use of a reference sequence specific to a given species to validate its identification. The technique...
Article
Full-text available
Biological invasions are one of the main global threats to biodiversity in terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems worldwide, requiring effective inventorying and monitoring programs. Here, we present an updated list of non-indigenous species in French marine and transitional waters. Focused on eukaryote pluricellular species found throughout...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive alien species are a major worldwide driver of biodiversity change. The current study lists verified records of non-indigenous species (NIS) in European marine waters until 2020, with the purpose of establishing a baseline, assessing trends, and discussing appropriate threshold values for good environmental status (GES) according to the rel...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The goal of the ICES Working Group on the Introduction and Transfers of Marine Organisms (WGITMO) is to contribute to the ICES vision and mission by addressing specific science objectives related to the introduction, spread and impacts of non-indigenous marine species (NIS). The expert working group provides information and advice on the impacts of...
Article
Human-mediated introductions are reshuffling species distribution on a global scale. Consequently, an increasing number of allopatric taxa are now brought into contact, promoting introgressive hybridization between incompletely isolated species and new adaptive gene transfer. The broadcast spawning marine species, Ciona robusta, has been recently i...
Article
Full-text available
Humans have built ports on all the coasts of the world, allowing people to travel, exploit the sea, and develop trade. The proliferation of these artificial habitats and the associated maritime traffic are not predicted to fade in the coming decades. Ports share common characteristics: species find themselves in novel singular environments, with pa...
Article
Marinas are high-priority targets for marine non-indigenous species (NIS), where they compose a large portion of the biofouling communities. The practicality of water samples collection makes environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding an interesting tool for routine NIS surveys. Here the effectiveness of water-eDNA-metabarcoding to identify biofouling...
Preprint
Full-text available
Human-mediated introductions are reshuffling species distribution on a global scale. Consequently, an increasing number of allopatric taxa are now brought into contact, promoting introgressive hybridization between incompletely isolated species and new adaptive gene transfer. The broadcast spawning marine species, Ciona robusta , has been recently...
Article
Among anthropogenic habitats built in the marine environment, floating and non-floating structures can be colonized by distinct assemblages. However, there is little knowledge whether these differences are also reflected in the functional structure. This study compared the functional diversity of sessile and mobile invertebrate assemblages that set...
Article
Full-text available
The International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments (BWM Convention) aims to mitigate the introduction risk of harmful aquatic organisms and pathogens (HAOP) via ships’ ballast water and sediments. The BWM Convention has set regulations for ships to utilise exceptions and exemptions from ballast water m...
Article
Human‐driven translocations of species have diverse evolutionary consequences such as promoting hybridization between previously geographically isolated taxa. This is well‐illustrated by the solitary tunicate, Ciona robusta, native to the North East Pacific and introduced in the North East Atlantic. It is now co‐occurring with its congener C. intes...
Preprint
Full-text available
Human-driven translocations of species have diverse evolutionary consequences such as promoting hybridization between previously geographically isolated taxa. This is well-illustrated by the solitary tunicate, Ciona robusta , native to the North East Pacific and introduced in the North East Atlantic. It is now co-occurring with its congener C. inte...
Article
The coastal oceans can be highly variable, especially near ocean fronts. The Ushant Front is the dominant oceanographic feature in the Iroise Sea (NE Atlantic) during summer, separating warm stratified offshore waters from cool vertically-mixed nearshore waters. Mesozooplankton community structure was investigated over an annual cycle to examine re...
Preprint
This protocol describes a double digested restriction-site associated DNA (ddRADseq) procedure, that is a variation on the original RAD sequencing method (Davey & Blaxter 2011), which is used for de novo SNP discovery and genotyping. This protocol differs from the original ddRADseq protocol (Peterson et al 2012), in which the samples are pooled jus...
Article
Full-text available
Species distributions have been profoundly affected by past climate change, and are expected to change considerably in response to future environmental change. To better apprehend how future climate change is likely to affect genetic diversity in marine populations, it is essential to first evaluate the processes that have shaped the current distri...
Article
Full-text available
• High‐throughput sequencing of amplicons (HTSA) has been proposed as an effective approach to evaluate taxonomic and genetic diversity at the same time. However, there are still uncertainties as to how the results produced by different bioinformatics treatments impact the conclusions drawn on biodiversity and population genetics indices. • We eval...
Article
Full-text available
Human activity is an important driver of ecological and evolutionary change on our planet. In particular, domestication and biological introductions have important and long-lasting effects on species’ genomic architecture and diversity. However, genome-wide analysis of independent domestication and introduction events within a single species has no...
Article
Examining the effects of disturbances within marine urban communities can shed light on their assembly rules and invasion processes. The effects of physical disturbance, through the removal of dominant native habitat-builders, were investigated in the recolonization of disturbed patches and colonization of plates on pier pilings, in a Chilean port....
Article
Full-text available
Marine hard-bottom communities are undergoing severe change under the influenceof multiple drivers, notably climate change, extraction ofnatural resources, pollutionand eutrophication, habitat degradation, and invasive species. Monitoring marinebiodiversity in such habitats is, however, challenging as it typically involves expensive,non-standardize...
Article
Full-text available
Marine hard-bottom communities are undergoing severe change under the influence of multiple drivers, notably climate change, extraction of natural resources, pollution and eutrophication, habitat degradation, and invasive species. Monitoring marine biodiversity in such habitats is, however, challenging as it typically involves expensive, non-standa...
Article
Full-text available
Marine hard-bottom communities are undergoing severe change under the influence of multiple drivers, notably climate change, extraction of natural resources, pollution and eutrophication, habitat degradation, and invasive species. Monitoring marine biodiversity in such habitats is, however, challenging as it typically involves expensive, non-standa...
Article
Species introductions promote secondary contacts between taxa with long histories of allopatric divergence. Anthropogenic contact zones thus offer valuable contrasts to speciation studies in natural systems where past spatial isolations may have been brief or intermittent. Investigations of anthropogenic hybridization are rare for marine animals, w...
Article
A strongly divergent lineage, putatively a new cryptic species, of colonial ascidian was first detected as an anomalous sample in a population genomics study of the well-known worldwide invasive species Didemnum vexillum Kott, 2002. This putative new taxon, found in a marina in Roscoff, France, is indistinguishable from Didemnum vexillum in the ext...
Article
Full-text available
The genus Ciona is an interesting 'taxonomic case' because its evolutionary history and taxonomy have not yet been resolved completely. In this study, we present new findings, describing specimens of an unidentified Ciona species collected along the northeastern coasts of Sardinia (Tyrrhenian Sea, Mediterranean Sea). Applying an integrative taxonom...
Article
The genus Ciona is an interesting ‘taxonomic case’ because its evolutionary history and taxonomy have not yet been resolved completely. In this study, we present new findings, describing specimens of an unidentified Ciona species collected along the north-eastern coasts of Sardinia (Tyrrhenian Sea, Mediterranean Sea). Applying an integrative taxono...
Article
Full-text available
Twenty‐years of genetic studies of marine invaders have shown that successful invaders are often characterized by native and introduced populations displaying similar levels of genetic diversity. This pattern is presumably due to high propagule pressure and repeated introductions. The opposite pattern is reported in this study of the brown seaweed,...
Article
Full-text available
Human‐mediated transport creates secondary contacts between genetically differentiated lineages, bringing new opportunities for gene exchange. When similar introductions occur in different places, they provide informally replicated experiments for studying hybridisation. We here examined 4279 Mytilus mussels, sampled in Europe and genotyped with 77...
Article
Full-text available
Of the suite of species interactions involved in biotic resistance to species invasions, predation can have complex outcomes according to the theoretical and empirical framework of community ecology. In this study, we aimed to determine the likelihood of consumptive biotic resistance within fouling communities in four ports of central Chile. Notabl...
Preprint
Full-text available
Human-mediated transport creates secondary contacts between genetically differentiated lineages, bringing new opportunities for gene exchange. When similar introductions occur in different places, they provide informally replicated experiments for studying hybridisation. We here examined 4279 Mytilus mussels, sampled in Europe and genotyped with 77...
Preprint
Full-text available
Biological invasions have reached an unprecedented level and the number of introduced species is still increasing worldwide. Despite major advances in invasion science, the determinants of success of introduced species, the magnitude and dimensions of their impact, and the mechanisms sustaining successful invasions are still debated. Empirical stud...
Article
Biological invasions have reached an unprecedented level and the number of introduced species is still increasing worldwide. Despite major advances in invasion science, the determinants of success of introduced species, the magnitude and dimensions of their impact, and the mechanisms sustaining successful invasions are still debated. Empirical stud...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Working Group on the Introductions and Transfers of Marine Organisms (WGITMO) has contributed several major achievements to the ICES vision, including the first ICES Viewpoint on Biofouling and its source document, two Cooperative Research Reports, and numerous pub-lications related to ToRs, and the continued population of the AquaNIS database....
Article
Full-text available
Aim Phenology of a wide diversity of organisms has a dependency on climate, usually with reproductive periods beginning earlier in the year and lasting longer at lower latitudes. Temperature and day length are known environmental drivers of the reproductive timing of many species. Hence, reproductive phenology is sensitive to warming and is importa...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Ce rapport présente la version actualisée de la partie « Atlantique » du référentiel national des habitats marins benthiques en expliquant les modifications opérées. La mise à jour de la partie marine du référentiel européen EUNIS ainsi que les échanges avec les benthologues ont conduit à revoir les principes généraux de la typologie. La structure...
Chapter
Full-text available
Visconti, P., Elias, V., Sousa Pinto, I., Fischer, M., Ali-Zade, V., Báldi, A., Brucet, S., Bukvareva, E., Byrne, K., Caplat, P., Feest, A., Guerra, C., Gozlan, R., Jelić, D., Kikvidze, Z., Lavrillier, A., Le Roux, X., Lipka, O., Petrík, P., Schatz, B., Smelansky, I. and Viard, F. (2018): Chapter 3: Status, trends and future dynamics of biodiversit...
Article
Full-text available
Seaweed-associated microbiota experience spatial and temporal shifts in response to changing environmental conditions and seaweed physiology. These shifts may result in structural, functional and behavioral changes in the host with potential consequences for its fitness. They, thus, may help the host to adapt to changing environmental conditions. T...
Data
Table A. PERMANOVA results: Structure of bacterial communities associated with S. muticum, seawater and sediments (ti) at two locations (lo) and three months (mo). Table B. PERMANOVA Pair-wise tests between locations by month and seaweed structure of the interaction term ‘location x month x tissue’ of bacterial community structure associated with S...
Article
Growing coastal urbanization together with the intensification of maritime traffic are major processes explaining the increasing rate of biological introductions in marine environments. To investigate the link between international maritime traffic and the establishment of non-indigenous species (NIS) in coastal areas, biofouling communities in thr...
Article
Full-text available
Ports and farms are well‐known primary introduction hotspots for marine non‐indigenous species (NIS). The extent to which these anthropogenic habitats are sustainable sources of propagules and influence the evolution of NIS in natural habitats was examined in the edible seaweed Undaria pinnatifida, native to Asia and introduced to Europe in the 197...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean acidification significantly affects marine organisms in several ways, with complex interactions. Seaweeds might benefit from rising CO 2 through increased photosynthesis and carbon acquisition, with subsequent higher growth rates. However, changes in seaweed chemistry due to increased CO 2 may change the nutritional quality of tissue for graz...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The completion of the first evaluation cycle of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive has led to an update of the national non-indigenous species lists. Since 2016, 19 new in-troductions and six range expansions have been reported along the French coasts. MSFD monitoring and surveillance programmes are being defined and will prioritise hot-spots...
Article
Full-text available
Molecular studies sometimes reveal evolutionary divergence within accepted species. Such findings can initiate taxonomic revision, as exemplified in the formerly recognized species Ciona intestinalis. While an increasing number of studies have examined the ecology, reproductive barriers and genetics of C. intestinalis and C. robusta, there are stil...
Article
Full-text available
This study described the occurrence of abnormalities in bivalve larvae from the Puck Bay. Analyses of plankton samples collected in 2012–2013 showed that larval Mytilus trossulus, Mya arenaria, and Cerastoderma glaucum exhibited abnormalities that could indicate adverse environmental impacts. The deformities were mainly in shells, but missing soft...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal human-made structures, such as marinas and harbors, are expanding worldwide. Species assemblages described from these artificial habitats are novel relative to natural reefs, particularly in terms of the abundance of nonindigenous species (NIS). Although these fouling assemblages are clearly distinctive, the ecosystem functioning and specie...
Article
Human-mediated transports of species, i.e. biological introductions, promote secondary contacts between previously spatially isolated species. When the species are not reproductively isolated, hybridization is an important possible outcome of these secondary contacts, influencing the fate of both the native and non-native species. Such a situation...