Frederico Neves

Frederico Neves
Federal University of Minas Gerais | UFMG · Departamento de Genética Ecologia e Evolução (GEE)

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168
Publications
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Introduction
Frederico Neves currently works at the Departamento de Genética, Ecologia e Evolução in the Federal University of Minas Gerais. Frederico does research in Insect Ecology and Insect-Plant Interactions.

Publications

Publications (168)
Article
Full-text available
Understanding tropical forest succession is critical for the development of tropical forest conservation strategies worldwide, given that tropical secondary forests can be considered the forests of the future. Tropical dry forests (TDF) are among the most threatened tropical ecosystems, there are more secondary forests and forest restoration effort...
Article
Full-text available
We reviewed the evidence on the role of ants as plant biotic defenses, by conducting meta-analyses for the effects of experimental removal of ants on plant herbivory and fitness with data pooled from 81 studies. Effects reviewed were plant herbivory, herbivore abundance, hemipteran abundance, predator abundance, plant biomass and reproduction in st...
Article
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Parasitic plants are important sources of stress and can strongly impact their host plants through direct and indirect associations with other herbivores and their associated organisms. In the tropics, mistletoes are frequent parasitic plants, influencing different trophic levels involved with the host plant. Here, we investigated the direct and in...
Article
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Fluid-feeding herbivores directly affect host plants through sap consumption. Moreover, they establish mutualistic relationships with ants, which might generate additional reproductive costs related to pollinator repellence. Here we studied the drivers of variation in the outcomes of these interactions from the perspective of Psittacanthus robustus...
Article
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Ants, an ecologically successful and numerically dominant group of animals, play key ecological roles as soil engineers, predators, nutrient recyclers, and regulators of plant growth and reproduction in most terrestrial ecosystems. Further, ants are widely used as bioindicators of the ecological impact of land use. We gathered information of ant sp...
Article
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Trophic specialisation is known to vary across space, but the environmental factors explaining such variation remain elusive. Here we used a global dataset of flower-visitor networks to evaluate how trophic specialisation varies between latitudinal zones (tropical and temperate) and across elevation gradients, while considering the environmental va...
Article
Fluid-feeding herbivores directly affect host plants through sap consumption. Moreover, they establish mutualistic relationships with ants, which might generate additional reproductive costs related to pollinator repellence. Here we studied the drivers of variation in the outcomes of these interactions from the perspective of Psittacanthus robustus...
Article
Insects make up the bulk of terrestrial diversity and about half of insect species are herbivores that have direct relationships with their host plants and are the basis of the entire food chain, on which wildlife and humanity depend. Some herbivorous insect traits, such as their spatio-temporal distribution, are especially relevant in the current...
Article
en In tropical forest canopies, host tree characteristics shape epiphyte communities, and both host tree characteristics and epiphytes determine invertebrate communities, for example, ants. Tree height is among the factors most often mentioned as a strong predictor for both bromeliad and ant communities. However, many factors interact dynamically i...
Article
• Termite nests may offer shelter to a number of species, alleviating the effects of environmental harshness. Certain elevational gradients provide variation on edaphoclimatic features, possibly generating harsh environmental conditions and boosting the number of immigrants seeking shelter within termitaria. Therefore, it is expected that metrics d...
Article
Naturally fragmented landscapes are adequate systems for evaluating patterns and mechanisms that determine species distribution without confounding effects of anthropogenic fragmentation and habitat loss. We aimed to evaluate an ant metacommunity's spatiotemporal patterns in montane forest islands amid a grassland-dominated matrix. We assessed thes...
Article
en Tropical dry forests (TDFs) are one of the most threatened ecosystems worldwide. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of TDFs in South America: the Amazonian TDF hypothesis and the Pleistocene Arc hypothesis (PAH). There is a need to evaluate the distribution patterns of different organisms across the TDF distribution. We test...
Article
How much leaf area do insects eat? A data set of insect herbivory sampled globally with a standardized protocol. Ecology 102(4): Abstract. Herbivory is ubiquitous. Despite being a potential driver of plant distribution and performance, herbivory remains largely undocumented. Some early attempts have been made to review, globally, how much leaf area...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat conversion is one of the major threats for biodiversity conservation and viability of natural populations. Thus, habitat disturbance alters distinct ecological processes, such as plant reproductive success and diaspore fate. In this study, we determined the effects of seasonally tropical dry forests (STDFs) conversion by anthropogenic distu...
Article
Ancient tropical mountains are megadiverse, yet little is known about the distribution of their species. We aimed to disentangle the effects of latitudinal and elevational gradients on the distribution of species of Aculeata and to understand the effects of climatic variables across different spatial scales of diversity (α‐, γ‐, and β‐diversity). C...
Article
Herbivory is ubiquitous. Despite being a potential driver of plant distribution and performance, herbivory remains largely undocumented. Some early attempts have been made to review, globally, how much leaf area is removed through insect feeding. Kozlov et al. (2015), in one of the most comprehensive reviews regarding global patterns of herbivory,...
Article
en Ants are diverse and ecologically important organisms in tropical forests, where their spatiotemporal distribution can be highly complex. This complexity arises mainly from marked differences in microclimatic conditions and resource availability through space and time that is even more evident in highly seasonal environments, such as tropical dr...
Article
Both decreases in compositional similarity with increasing geographic distances between sites (i.e. distance–decay relationship) and vertical stratification of species composition are key issues in ecology. However, the intersection between these two trends has scarcely been investigated. Here we use identical sampling methods in the canopy and at...
Article
Full-text available
The general pattern of herbivory throughout succession has been drawn chiefly from temperate forest studies and mainly at the understorey. This is one of the very few studies to document canopy herbivory in relation to successional stages of tropical seasonally dry forests. Diversity of free-feeding herbivores (chewing and sap-sucking) and leaf dam...
Article
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Global sustainability rests on a myriad of benefits provided by natural ecosystems that support human livelihoods and well-being, from biodiversity persistence to climate regulation. The undeniable importance of conserving tropical forests has drawn most of the conservation spotlight towards it. However, open ecosystems such as the Brazilian Campo...
Article
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Ecological communities vary considerably in space and time and understanding such changes has fundamental relevance for ecology and conservation sciences. Mountains provide an excellent scenario for studies addressing spatial and temporal variation, as they vary in conditions and resources in a small geographic region. Here, we aimed to understand...
Article
en Mountains are among the most powerful natural gradients for testing ecological and evolutionary responses of biota to environmental influences because differences in climate and plant structure occur over short spatial scales. We describe the spatiotemporal distribution patterns and drives of fruit‐feeding butterfly diversity in the mountainous...
Article
Nestedness is widely observed in natural metacommunities, but its underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. The distribution of habitats in the landscape and differences in dispersal rates of distinct insect taxa can determine the nestedness of the metacommunity. Here, we evaluated how species habitat specialization contributes to metacomm...
Article
Nestedness is widely observed in natural metacommunities, but its underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. The distribution of habitats in the landscape and differences in dispersal rates of distinct insect taxa can determine the nestedness of the metacommunity. Here, we evaluated how species habitat specialization contributes to metacomm...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the factors that influence the composition and structure of bee communities in natural habitats is critical for conservation and restoration efforts, mainly in disturbed ecosystems that are widely used for agricultural crop production, such as tropical dry forests (TDF). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tree specie...
Article
1. Traditionally, most studies have described the organization of host-parasite interaction networks by considering only few host groups at limited geographical extents. However, host-parasite relationships are merged within different taxonomic groups and factors shaping these interactions likely differ between host and parasite groups, making grou...
Article
• We investigated the patterns of taxonomic (TD) and functional (FD) α and β‐diversities of ants in a mountainous landscape along three dimensions, namely one temporal (seasonal) and two spatial dimensions: between habitats – grassland and forest habitats (horizontal), and among elevation bands (vertical). In addition, we tested the effects of envi...
Article
Full-text available
Naturally fragmented landscapes provide a suitable opportunity for investigating species dynamics under the sole influence of habitat fragmentation. Various approaches have used landscape attributes (e.g., patch size and connectivity) to explain patterns of species diversity and composition. We evaluated the influence that patch and landscape attri...
Article
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Myrmecochory (seed dispersal by ants) is a unique seed dispersal syndrome among invertebrates. It comprises three main phases: seed removal, seed manipulation, and seed deposition. However, the contribution of each phase to seed and seedling fate remains unclear. Here, we experimentally quantified the effects of each phase of myrmecochory on seed g...
Article
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Tackling complex environmental issues requires transdisciplinary solutions that cannot be achieved, unless we integrate scientific disciplines and communicate science directly with civil society actors, decision-makers, and stakeholders. Alexander von Humboldt offered an approach to integrate knowledge across disciplines aiming to broadly understan...
Article
Full-text available
Tackling complex environmental issues requires transdisciplinary solutions that cannot be achieved, unless we integrate scientific disciplines and communicate science directly with civil society actors, decision-makers, and stakeholders. Alexander von Humboldt offered an approach to integrate knowledge across disciplines aiming to broadly understan...
Article
Insect–plant interactions occur in several ways and have considerable environmental and ecological importance. Many feeding strategies have evolved among herbivorous insects, with host–herbivore systems likely being influenced by trophobionts with ants. We investigated how these interactions vary across elevation gradients by evaluating the structu...
Article
Full-text available
When aiming to assess the effects of elevation on animal diversity, many studies have been carried out in different vegetation types occurring across elevational gradients. Thus, it remains unclear if any changes observed in species richness are caused by factors directly associated with elevation or are caused by vegetation change across the gradi...
Article
Full-text available
From 2013 to 2016, a study using Malaise traps (primarily designed for hymenopteran communities) was carried out through the Espinhaço Mountain Range, among the Brazilian states of Minas Gerais and Bahia. A total of 1,000 butterflies belonging to six families, Pieridae (n = 353), Nymphalidae (n = 274), Hesperiidae (n = 205), Lycaenidae (n = 139), R...
Article
1. Disturbance is a strong driver of community assembly and fire has long been recognised as one of the main disturbances of terrestrial ecosystems. This study tested the resilience of dung beetles to fire events in campos rupestres, which is a tropical savanna ecosystem that evolved under a frequent fire regime, by assessing the resistance and rec...
Article
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Tropical dry forests are characterized by a pronounced dry season, when most trees shed their leaves, and a rainy season characterized by the production of new leaves. This study aimed to determine the effect of the first rains at the beginning of the rainy season on the insect herbivore fauna. We sampled 90 trees at the end of the dry season and 6...
Article
Ground-dwelling ants are active foragers that may extend their foraging area into the vegetation, although the factors affecting their diversity in the suspended litter of understorey plants remain overlooked. To evaluate the influence of the distance between strata, litter biomass and plant size on the ant fauna, the litter ant assemblage of the s...
Article
Full-text available
Canopy ecology is a fast-growing field, but still a scientific frontier in many ecological aspects. For instance, the hypothesis that tree traits shape patterns in ant-plant interactions lacks data, notably for tropical canopies in different successional stages. In this study, we investigated canopy traits, such as tree height, the presence of extr...
Article
Abstract Tropical dry forests are among the most threatened tropical ecosystems. Human-modifications to landscapes create forest patches that vary in size and shape, which in turn affects regional insect diversity. We evaluated β-diversity of insect herbivores and the effects that forest cover has on guild richness and abundance at five landscape s...
Article
Campo rupestre is a megadiverse vegetation mosaic dominating one of the world’s geologically oldest tropical mountains. The campo rupestre hosts nearly 15% of Brazil’s flora, with 40% of endemism in an area smaller than 1% of the national territory. Here, we summarize and explain the rationale underlying the long-term ecological research at Serra d...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Tradução do artigo original "Ecology and evolution of plant diversity in the endangered campo 26 rupestre: a neglected conservation priority. Plant and Soil 403: 192-152" que pode ser acessado aqui (https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11104-015-2637-8). Em caso de citação, deve-se mencionar o artigo original. A permissão para a tradução foi...
Article
Full-text available
Highly seasonal conditions of tropical dry forests determine the temporal patterns of insect abundance. However, density-independent factors such as natural disturbances can abruptly change environmental conditions, affecting insect populations. We address the effects of the Hurricane Patricia (category 5) on species density and abundance of three...
Article
Animal-plant interactions have a major influence on ecosystem structure and functioning. Understanding to what extent the temporal dynamics of interactions is determined by climate and disturbances is thus relevant to predict ecological and evolutionary outcomes in a changing world. Here, we assessed whether the temporal dynamics of ant-plant inter...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity loss and anthropogenic environmental changes are known to impact ecosystem functions and services. However, there are still some uncertainties such as confounding environmental factors other than community attributes that affect ecosystem functioning. Our goal was to understand what factors influence the performance of Scarabaeinae dun...
Article
Naturally fragmented landscapes provide suitable scenarios through which to investigate patch and landscape effects on biodiversity patterns in areas that are isolated from the disturbances usually associated with human-made fragments. We aimed to investigate the patch and landscape effects on the diversity of forest-dependent and matrix-tolerant d...
Data
Experimental setup for assessment of diaspore removal in the field. A, B—Sampling blocks comprising two tracking stations close to each other, one with diaspore piles accessible to ants and vertebrates (open) and the other accessible exclusively to ants (caged); Wire exclosure cages with seed (C) and fruit piles (D); E—Wire cage structure without m...
Data
Overview of the study site and plant species. A, B—Study site encompassing campo rupestre vegetation; C—Miconia irwinii treelet; D—Ripe fruits; E, F—Fruits with fleshy pulp partially eaten by birds. (PDF)
Data
Data from “Handling by avian frugivores affects diaspore secondary removal”. (XLSX)
Data
Birds acting as primary seed dispersers of Miconia irwinii at Serra do Cipó, Brazil. The Cinnamon Tanager (Schistochlamys ruficapillus) (A) and the Black-throated Saltator (Saltatricula atricollis) (B) feeding on M. irwinii fruits, pulp-free seeds stuck to the birds’ bills in detail; the Rufous-collared Sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis) (C), the Plain...
Data
Ground-dwelling fauna recorded during diaspore removal experiments. A—The Brazilian Guinea Pig (Cavia aperea), its feces and footprints found on a tracking station with missing pulp-free seeds (B); The lizards Tropidurus montanus (C), Eurolophosaurus nanuzae (D) and Ameivula cipoensis (E) were frequently recorded near tracking stations; F—The ant C...
Data
The ant Camponotus rufipes as a secondary seed disperser of Miconia irwinii. Edited by AJA. (MP4)
Data
Traps installed to intercept diaspores falling beneath the crown of Miconia irwinii. A, B, C—Fruiting individuals of M. irwinii with diaspore traps; D—Detail of a diaspore trap made with filter paper attached to wire circles; E—A twine coated with sticky barrier in detail; F—The Chalk-browed Mockingbird (Mimus saturninus) feeding on M. irwinii frui...
Data
S2 Fig. Traps installed to intercept diaspores falling beneath the crown of Miconia irwinii. A, B, C - Fruiting individuals of M. irwinii with diaspore traps; D - Detail of a diaspore trap made with filter paper attached to wire circles; E - A twine coated with sticky barrier in detail; F - The Chalk-browed Mockingbird (Mimus saturninus) feeding on...
Data
S1 Fig. Overview of the study site and plant species. A, B - Study site encompassing campo rupestre vegetation; C - Miconia irwinii treelet; D - Ripe fruits; E, F - Fruits with fleshy pulp partially eaten by birds.
Data
S4 Fig. Birds acting as primary seed dispersers of Miconia irwinii at Serra do Cipó, Brazil. The Cinnamon Tanager (Schistochlamys ruficapillus) (A) and the Black-throated Saltator (Saltatricula atricollis) (B) feeding on M. irwinii fruits, pulp-free seeds stuck to the birds’ bills in detail; the Rufous-collared Sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis) (C), t...
Data
S1 Film. The ant Camponotus rufipes as a secondary seed disperser of Miconia irwinii. Edited by André Jardin Arruda.
Data
S3 Fig. Experimental setup for assessment of diaspore removal in the field. A, B - Sampling blocks comprising two tracking stations close to each other, one with diaspore piles accessible to ants and vertebrates (open) and the other accessible exclusively to ants (caged); Wire exclosure cages with seed (C) and fruit piles (D); E - Wire cage structu...
Data
S5 Fig. Ground-dwelling fauna recorded during diaspore removal experiments. A - The Brazilian Guinea Pig (Cavia aperea), its feces and footprints found on a tracking station with missing pulp-free seeds (B); The lizards Tropidurus montanus (C), Eurolophosaurus nanuzae (D) and Ameivula cipoensis (E) were frequently recorded near tracking stations; F...