Frederic Maps

Frederic Maps
Laval University | ULAVAL · Department of Biology

Professor

About

52
Publications
11,555
Reads
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968
Citations
Citations since 2017
29 Research Items
528 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
Introduction
Numerical modelling of marine ecosystems. Arctic marine ecology. Zooplankton. In situ imagery. Machine learning.

Publications

Publications (52)
Article
Full-text available
The trophic relationships interconnecting marine organisms together into a dynamic trophic network drive the structure and the functioning of the entire ecosystem. Since the flow of carbon within trophic networks is controlled by a variety of functional traits related to food acquisition and individual survival, it is crucial to understand how func...
Article
Full-text available
Plankton imaging systems supported by automated classification and analysis have improved ecologists' ability to observe aquatic ecosystems. Today, we are on the cusp of reliably tracking plankton populations with a suite of lab‐based and in situ tools, collecting imaging data at unprecedentedly fine spatial and temporal scales. But these data have...
Article
Full-text available
Buoyant Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) eggs are found at the surface or at the ice-water interface in winter. While winter temperatures in saline waters fall below 0°C, the temperature in areas affected by under-ice river plumes is slightly higher. Under-ice river plumes may therefore provide thermal refuges favoring the survival of the vulnerable e...
Article
Full-text available
In environments with strong seasonality, many herbivorous zooplankton remain active only during the productive season and undergo a period of inactivity and suppressed development termed ‘diapause’ during the unproductive season. The ability to time the diapause entry and exit in response to the seasonality of the environment is thus essential for...
Article
Starting ~2010, declines in Calanus finmarchicus and Calanus hyperboreus, the biomass dominant copepods on the northwest Atlantic shelf, coincide with notable ocean warming and a northward shift in endangered North Atlantic right whale (Eubalena glacialis) foraging habitat from the Bay of Fundy/Western Scotian Shelf to the southern Gulf of St. Lawr...
Article
Full-text available
Imaging techniques are increasingly used in ecology studies, producing vast quantities of data. Inferring functional traits from individual images can provide original insights on ecosystem processes. Morphological traits are, as other functional traits, individual characteristics influencing an organism’s fitness. We measured them from in situ ima...
Article
Full-text available
The seasonal sea ice cover and the massive influx of river runoff into the Hudson Bay System (HBS) of the Canadian Arctic are critical factors influencing biological production and, ultimately, the dynamics and structure of benthic communities in the region. This study provides the most recent survey of epibenthic communities in Hudson Bay and Huds...
Article
Full-text available
Aquatic ecologists face challenges in identifying the general rules of the functioning of ecosystems. A common framework, including freshwater, marine, benthic, and pelagic ecologists, is needed to bridge communication gaps and foster knowledge sharing. This framework should transcend local specificities and taxonomy in order to provide a common gr...
Article
Full-text available
The relationships between infaunal diversity and ecosystem function of biogenic structures in the Eastern Canadian Arctic remain poorly documented. Our study investigated the influence of sponge gardens at the Frobisher Bay site (137 m) and bamboo corals at the Baffin Bay site (1007 m) on the infaunal community structure and benthic ecosystem funct...
Article
The two species Thysanoessa raschii and Meganyctiphanes norvegica dominate the krill biomass of the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence (EGSL) ecosystem. The EGSL is the southernmost limit of seasonal sea-ice cover in the North Atlantic and constitutes a dynamic frontier between Arctic and Atlantic water masses. In order to better understand the compl...
Article
Full-text available
Baffin Bay, located at the Arctic Ocean’s ‘doorstep’, is a heterogeneous environment where a warm and salty eastern current flows northwards in the opposite direction of a cold and relatively fresh Arctic current flowing along the west coast of the bay. This circulation affects the physical and biogeochemical environment on both sides of the bay. T...
Article
Numerical models of marine ecosystems tend to increase in complexity, incorporating a growing number of functions and parameters. Here, we reflect on the issue of “anchoring” inherent to model development, i.e. the tendency for modellers to take processes, functional forms and parameters from previous studies as granted. We focused on the particula...
Article
Two copepod species, Calanus finmarchicus and Calanus hyperboreus, constitute the main prey of endangered North Atlantic right whales in eastern Canadian shelf waters. Estimating the spatial distribution of Calanus spp. and understanding how it changes in response to environmental variability are crucial information requirements for mitigating risk...
Chapter
Full-text available
Arctic marine ecosystems provide numerous benefits and services of economic, societal and ecological value, including the provision of food resources, the conservation of biodiversity, carbon storage and nutrient recycling, among others. The Arc3Bio project combines the multidisciplinary skills of several experts to evaluate how climate variability...
Poster
Full-text available
Aquatic ecologists face a common challenge: identifying the general rules of the functioning of aquatic ecosystems and developing a more predictive ecological understanding. However, freshwater and marine ecologists traditionally form two distinct scientific communities that barely communicate with each other. A common language is needed to foster...
Article
The Nordic krill Meganyctiphanes norvegica and Arctic krill Thysanoessa raschii both dominate the krill community within the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence system where they are central forage species for its pelagic ecosystem. We developed a species‐specific physiological individual based model that implements the critical physiological processe...
Article
Dimethylsulfide (DMS), a dominant organic sulfur species in the surface ocean, may act as a signaling molecule and contribute to mutualistic interactions between bacteria and marine algae. These proposed functions depend on the DMS concentration in the vicinity of the microorganisms. Here we modeled the DMS enrichment at the surface of DMS‐releasin...
Article
The interplay between biological and chemical reactions in the freshwater phytoplankton phycosphere and the resulting modulations of contaminant speciation and uptake is poorly characterized. Here we modeled the effect of algal C and N uptake on carbonate cycling and speciation of selected contaminants in the phycosphere (external boundary layer) o...
Article
Full-text available
Copepod lipids fuel the Arctic marine ecosystem, but information on the fine-scale distribution of copepods and lipids is nonexistent. This study investigated the fine-scale (1 m) vertical distribution of the copepods Calanus hyperboreus, Calanus glacialis and Metridia longa during a Lagrangian drift in the North Water Polynya using the Lightframe...
Article
The extreme and variable environment shapes the functioning of Arctic ecosystems and the life cycles of its species. This delicate balance is now threatened by the unprecedented pace and magnitude of global climate change and anthropogenic pressure. Understanding the long-term consequences of these changes remains an elusive, yet pressing, goal. Ou...
Poster
Full-text available
The benthic environments can be subjected to different biotic and abiotic factors that enable the establishment of micro-habitats for organisms living on the bottom. This diversity of habitats can lead to differences in community structure with larger abundances and diversities defining our hotspot perception. Hudson Bay is an inland sea subject to...
Technical Report
Full-text available
We use a three-dimensional numerical circulation model and river runoff from a hydrological model to assess the large-scale impacts of harnessing Quebec’s large rivers on the dynamics of the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Scotian Shelf. We first look at the impact of harnessing a single river (St. Lawrence River, Romaine River) or a subgroup of rivers (S...
Article
Full-text available
Permafrost thawing and erosion results in the enrichment of northern lakes by soil organic matter. These allochthonous inputs favour bacterial decomposition and may cause the draw-down of dissolved oxygen to anoxic conditions that promote methanogenesis. Our objective in the present study was to determine the seasonal variations in dissolved oxygen...
Article
Full-text available
Communities of large copepods form an essential hub of matter and energy fluxes in Arctic marine food webs. Intraguild predation on eggs and early larval stages occurs among the different species of those communities and it has been hypothesized to impact its structure and function. In order to better understand the interactions between dominant co...
Article
For many years, operational frameworks to guide ecosystem-based science in support of integrated marine management have been sought to address causes of marine ecosystem degradation resulting from human activities such as fisheries, industrial development, aquaculture, etc. In 2007, the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans developed several...
Article
Full-text available
The Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL) is a feeding ground for several baleen whale species from the North Atlantic, providing them with an abundant supply of krill during their seasonal presence. Krill aggregations are found along the abrupt topography formed by the deep channels, but the dynamics of krill aggregations have not yet been characterized at t...
Article
Full-text available
The planktonic copepod, Calanus finmarchicus, resides at the southern edge of its subarctic range in the Gulf of Maine (GoM). Here we investigate the population response of C. finmarchicus to record warming in the GoM in 2012. Demographic data from two time series stations and a plankton survey conducted in early autumn 2012 show that C. finmarchic...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In Canada, interest in a potential new krill source focusses on the evaluation of biochemical composition of northern and arctic krill for nutraceutical, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Our prime objective is to examine the ecological resilience of the krill stocks in the St. Lawrence system prior to human exploitation. Krill stocks must co...
Article
Full-text available
Record, N. R., Pershing, A. J. and Maps, F. 2014. Plankton post-paradox: reply to comment on “The paradox of the ‘paradox of the plankton’” by Record et al. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 71: 296–298. Classical theoretical ecology has largely focused on the coexistence of populations at the species level, particularly since the coining of the “p...
Article
Full-text available
Dormancy (diapause) is a key life-history strategy of pelagic copepods that allows them to thrive in highly seasonal environments. Successful dormancy of copepodid stages requires the ability to store energy efficiently (for example as lipids) and to slow down the rate of mobilization of this capital during the dormant period. The physiology of lip...
Article
Full-text available
Dormancy (diapause) is a key life history strategy of pelagic copepods that allows them to thrive in highly seasonal environments. Successful dormancy of copepodid stages requires the ability to store energy efficiently (for example as lipids) and to slow down the rate of mobilization of this capital during the dormant period. The physiology of lip...
Article
Full-text available
Plourde, S., McQuinn, I. H., Maps, F., St-Pierre, J-F., Lavoie, D., and Joly, P. 2014. Daytime depth and thermal habitat of two sympatric krill species in response to surface salinity variability in the Gulf of St Lawrence, eastern Canada. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 71: 272–281. We describe the response of acoustically determined weighted me...
Article
Full-text available
Maps, F., Plourde, S., Lavoie, D., McQuinn, I., and Chassé, J. 2014. Modelling the influence of daytime distribution on the transport of two sympatric krill species (Thysanoessa raschii and Meganyctiphanes norvegica) in the Gulf of St Lawrence, eastern Canada. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 71: 282–292. The Gulf of St Lawrence (GSL) provides sev...
Article
Full-text available
Record, N. R., Pershing, A. J., and Maps, F. 2014. The paradox of the “paradox of the plankton”. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 71: 236–240. One of the central orienting questions in biodiversity theory and ecology is the “paradox of the plankton”, which asks how it is possible for many species to coexist on limited resources given the tendency...
Article
Full-text available
Maps, F., Pershing, A. J., and Record, N. R. 2012. A generalized approach for simulating growth and development in diverse marine copepod species. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 69: 370–379. Predicting ecological changes under climate change requires mechanistic descriptions of the impact of environmental conditions on the physiology, life histo...
Article
Full-text available
A major goal of modern ecology is to understand macroecological patterns based on their mechanistic underpinnings. The metabolic theory of ecology predicts a monotonic increase of biodiversity with temperature based on the principles of metabolism. For marine copepods, observations have shown that while biodiversity does increase with temperature,...
Article
Full-text available
Calanus finmarchicus relies on dormancy to thrive in the seasonal environment of the boreal Atlantic. The lipid accumulation window (LAW) hypothesis proposes that a seasonal window of environmental conditions allows developing individuals to store enough lipids for dormancy to be safely initiated. Successful dormancy requires a sufficient amount of...
Article
The Gulf of St.-Lawrence (GSL) is a dynamic region supporting a productive pelagic ecosystem. This environment presents unique opportunities to study the interactions between the population dynamics of planktonic species and the variability of physical processes. The copepod Calanus finmarchicus is a dominant component of zooplankton biomass and ab...
Article
Full-text available
The life cycle of Calanus finmarchicus includes a prolonged dormancy phase that allows it to avoid the unfavourable environmental conditions typical of the upper ocean from late summer to early spring in the subarctic North Atlantic. Recent demographic, physiological and genetic evidence supports the hypothesis of a crucial role for lipid accumulat...
Article
Full-text available
Egg production rate (EPR) and subsequent egg-hatching success of Temora longicornis from the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence were measured in the laboratory and at sea during 2 cruises in late June and early July of 2000 and 2001. A quantitative, functional Ivlev relationship between EPR, food concentration (µg C l-1) and temperature was fit to the l...

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Projects

Projects (6)
Project
The Arctic Ocean (AO) is a key component of Earth’s climate, acting as a coolant by contributing ~10% to the global oceanic carbon pump. Its capacity to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere comes from its cold waters that favour CO2 dissolution and its highly productive continental shelves that help sequester this carbon. Yet, the AO is warming at an unprecedented rate and the local and global consequences of its rapid evolution remain uncertain. The Last Ice Area (LIA), north of Canada and Greenland, is the last sanctuary of multiyear sea ice in the AO. The LIA includes the Lincoln Sea, which hosts unique endemic sea ice-dependent ecosystems. However, the physical, chemical, and biological properties of the Lincoln Sea remain nearly undocumented. RED-AO aims at improving understanding of how global change influences ecosystem functioning and biogeochemical cycling in northern Baffin Bay and the Lincoln Sea – an emblematic refuge of climate change. This project proposes a pioneer oceanographic expedition during which, 4 for the first time, sea ice, hydrography, biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and contaminants, and marine ecosystems will be observed simultaneously. It will provide a comprehensive baseline for conservation efforts and allow us to study key processes related to past, present, and future climate-induced changes. This project will strengthen both the conservation and sustainable resource harvesting of this fragile region by helping to i) create and manage permanent marine protected areas supported by indigenous governments, and ii) support ecosystem-based management of commercial fisheries led by indigenous groups in the eastern Canadian Arctic.