Fred D. Davis

Fred D. Davis
University of Arkansas | U of A · Department of Information Systems

PhD Massachusetts Institute of Technology

About

90
Publications
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Introduction

Publications

Publications (90)
Article
Purpose In the past decade, smartphone adoption has reached almost 100% in industrialized countries, which is predominantly due to advancements in capabilities. Given the increasing number of people who are addicted to the smartphone and the significant growth of people who consume music via the smartphone, the purpose of the study is to explore th...
Book
This book presents the proceedings of the NeuroIS Retreat 2021, June 1-3, virtual conference, reporting on topics at the intersection of information systems (IS) research, neurophysiology and the brain sciences. Readers will discover the latest findings from top scholars in the field of NeuroIS, which offer detailed insights on the neurobiology und...
Book
This book presents the proceedings of the virtual conference NeuroIS Retreat 2020, June 2–4, hosted in Austria, reporting on topics at the intersection of information systems (IS) research, neurophysiology and the brain sciences. Readers will discover the latest findings from top scholars in the field of NeuroIS, which offer detailed insights on th...
Article
Full-text available
NeuroIS is a field in Information Systems (IS) that makes use of neuroscience and neurophysiological tools and knowledge to better understand the development, adoption, and impact of information and communication technologies. The fact that NeuroIS now exists for more than a decade motivated us to comprehensively review the academic literature. Inv...
Book
Full-text available
Science is a fundamental endeavor in human society, shaping our understanding of the world and the technological progress. As a former academic I fully appreciate and respect researchers who significantly contribute to the development of knowledge and its use and applicability in society. Neuro-Information-Systems (NeuroIS) with its focus on the ne...
Chapter
Full-text available
NeuroIS has emerged as a research field in the Information Systems (IS) discipline over the past decade. Since the inaugural NeuroIS Retreat in 2009, 166 individuals participated at this annual academic conference to discuss research and development projects at the nexus of IS and neuroscience research. Motivated by the fact that the NeuroIS Retrea...
Chapter
Full-text available
The objective of this laboratory experiment was to explore how product decision characteristics interact to influence the decision-maker’s cognitive load. A between-subject experiment with 23 participants was performed to test how four decision characteristics (Decision set size, Attribute value format, Display format, and Information sorting) inte...
Book
This book presents the proceedings of the NeuroIS Retreat 2018, June 19-21, Vienna, Austria, reporting on topics at the intersection of Information Systems (IS) research, neurophysiology and the brain sciences. Readers will discover the latest findings from top scholars in the field of NeuroIS, which offer detailed insights on the neurobiology unde...
Book
This book presents the proceedings of the Gmunden Retreat on NeuroIS 2017, reporting on topics at the intersection of Information Systems (IS) research, neurophysiology and the brain sciences. Readers will discover the latest findings from top scholars in the field of NeuroIS, which offer detailed insights on the neurobiology underlying IS behavior...
Chapter
Throughout the history of cognitive neuroscience, there has been an ongoing debate as to whether a mental process (e.g., trust) is localized in a discrete brain region or whether it is represented by a distributed network of brain regions.
Chapter
In the following, we present major statements in the NeuroIS literature on the importance of becoming familiar with the neuroscience literature in a given study context and the application of neuroscience knowledge in IS research without necessarily using neuroscience tools.
Chapter
To identify empirical NeuroIS papers published in peer-reviewed journals, we searched for articles via WEB OF KNOWLEDGESM (June 30, 2015). Specifically, we searched for “NeuroIS” based on the constraint .
Chapter
First, two studies (Sidorova et al. 2008; Steininger et al. 2009) identified trust as one of the major topics in both North American and European IS research. Sidorova et al. (2008), investigating the intellectual core of the IS discipline, analyzed 1615 abstracts of articles published in three North American IS journals from 1985 to 2006, and foun...
Chapter
The main question addressed in this book is how IS scholars can apply neuroscience knowledge to advance IS research without necessarily using neuroscience tools.
Chapter
The field of NeuroIS has made advancements during the recent past.
Chapter
Application of our approach implies identification, processing, and use of neuroscience knowledge. In particular, the IS researcher must acquire knowledge on the neural correlates of the constructs of his or her study.
Chapter
While all domains in neuroscience might be relevant for NeuroIS research to some degree, the field of cognitive neuroscience has been identified as the major reference discipline (e.g., Dimoka et al. 2011).
Book
This book shows how information systems (IS) scholars can effectively apply neuroscience expertise in ways that do not require neuroscience tools. However, the approach described here is intended to complement neuroscience tools, not to supplant them. Written by leading scholars in the field, it presents a review of the empirical literature on Neur...
Chapter
Although information systems (IS) scholars have been applying neurophysiological tools for decades, a renewed call for drawing on the brain sciences as a reference discipline for the IS field took place in December 2007, at the International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS) and at two pre-ICIS meetings (see Riedl and Léger 2016, p. 73, for...
Book
Full-text available
This book presents the proceedings of the Gmunden Retreat on NeuroIS 2016, reporting on topics at the intersection of Information Systems (IS) research, neurophysiology and the brain sciences. Readers will discover the latest findings from top scholars in the field of NeuroIS, which offer detailed insights on the neurobiology underlying IS behavior...
Book
Full-text available
This book shows how information systems (IS) scholars can effectively apply neuroscience expertise in ways that do not require neuroscience tools. However, the approach described here is intended to complement neuroscience tools, not to supplant them. Written by leading scholars in the field, it presents a review of the empirical literature on Neur...
Article
Full-text available
Information technology use is typically assumed to have positive effects for users, yet information technology use may also lead to negative consequences with various degrees of gravity. In the current work, we build on dual-systems theories to investigate negative consequences associated with mobile phones use (MPU), defined as the extent to which...
Article
The genesis of the Neuro-Information Systems (NeuroIS) field took place in 2007. Since then, a considerable number of IS scholars and academics from related disciplines have started to use theories, methods, and tools from neuroscience and psychophysiology to better understand human cognition, emotion, and behavior in IS contexts, and to develop ne...
Article
Various aspects of intrinsic motivation have long been theorized as key determinants of learning achievement. The present research seeks deeper insights into these intrinsically motivating mechanisms by investigating neurophysiological correlates of cognitive absorption in the context of enactive learning, specifically simulation-based training on...
Article
Full-text available
Avatars, as virtual humans possessing realistic faces, are increasingly used for social and economic interaction on the Internet. Research has already determined that avatar-based communication may increase perceived interpersonal trust in anonymous online environments. Despite this trust-inducing potential of avatars, however, we hypothesize that...
Conference Paper
Research geared toward technology use to promote health-related behaviors has been rapidly expanding, yet evidence regarding the effectiveness of the proposed interventions is inconclusive. The proposed study builds on self-regulation theory, persuasive system design model, and task-technology fit model to propose design guidelines essential for tr...
Article
Full-text available
This article discusses the role of commonly used neurophysiological tools such as psychophysiological tools (e.g., EKG, eye tracking) and neuroimaging tools (e.g., fMRI, EEG) in Information Systems research. There is heated interest now in the social sciences in capturing presumably objective data directly from the human body, and this interest in...
Book
Full-text available
NeuroIS is an emerging field in Information Systems (IS) that makes use of neuroscience and neurophysiological tools and theories to better understand the development, adoption, and impact of information technologies (IT). The Gmunden Retreat on NeuroIS is an annual academic conference taking place in June, with the objective to promote the success...
Conference Paper
This research investigates the use of knowledge structures (aka mental models) and Pathfinder network graph analysis techniques to assess the acquisition of enterprise resource planning (ERP) system business process knowledge. Two different ERP learning models are compared: the more traditional ERP learning model executed in a static business envir...
Conference Paper
Over the past decade, information technology has dramatically changed the context in which economic transactions take place. Increasingly, transactions are computer-mediated, so that, relative to human¬human interactions, human-computer interactions are gaining in relevance. Computer-mediated transactions, and in particular those related to the Int...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cognitive absorption (CA) corresponds to a state of deep involvement with a software program. CA has widely been studied over the last decade in the IT literature using psychometric instruments. Measuring ongoing CA with psychometric tools requires interrupting a subject’s ongoing usage behavior to self-evaluate their level of absorption. Such inte...
Article
Full-text available
The six authors comment on various facets of NeuroIS that appear relevant and important for BISE in four contributions. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12599-010-0130-8/fulltext.html
Article
Full-text available
This article aims to discuss the use of common neurophysiological tools, such as psychophysiological tools (e.g., EKG, eye tracking) and neuroimaging tools (e.g., fMRI, EEG) in Information Systems (IS) research. There is much interest in the social sciences in capturing objective data directly from the human body, and this interest has also been ga...
Article
Full-text available
The interplay between decision-making and decision-support tools has proven puzzling for many years. One of the most popular decision-support tools, what-if analysis, is no exception. Decades of empirical studies have found positive, negative, and null effects. In this paper, we contrast the marginal-analysis decision-making strategy enabled by wha...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This panel discusses the opportunities and challenges of applying cognitive neuroscience theories, methods, and tools to inform IS theories, methods, and data (termed "NeuroIS"). Given the ability of cognitive neuroscience to localize the functionality of brain areas that underlie higher-order human processes using functional neuroimaging tools, ma...
Article
This article reflects on the discussions of the fifteen participants (co authors) of a retreat on the "Foundations of NeuroIS" that took place in Gmunden (Austria) in September 2009. In particular, this article offers initial answers to a set of research questions which are important for the foundations of NeuroIS, an emerging subfield within the I...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Toward materializing the recently identified potential of cognitive neuroscience for IS research (Dimoka, Pavlou and Davis 2007), this paper demonstrates how functional neuroimaging tools can enhance our understanding of IS theories. Specifically, this study aims to uncover the neural mechanisms that underlie technology adoption by identifying the...
Article
The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) has been widely used to predict user acceptance and use based on perceived ease of use and usefulness. However, in order to design effective training interventions to improve user acceptance, it is necessary to better understand the antecedents and determinants of key acceptance constructs. In this research, we...
Article
Managers and analysts increasingly need to master the hands-on use of computer-based decision technologies including spreadsheet models. Effective training can prevent the lack of skill from impeding potential effectiveness gains from decision technologies. Among the wide variety of software training approaches in use today, recent research indicat...
Article
Full-text available
Research on individual-level technology adoption is one of the most mature streams of information systems (IS) research. In this paper, we compare the progress in the area of technology adoption with two widely-researched streams in psychology and organizational behavior: theory of planned behavior and job satisfaction. In addition to gauging the p...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper introduces the idea of drawing upon the cognitive neuroscience literature to inform IS research (herein termed "NeuroIS"). Recent advances in cognitive neuroscience are uncovering the neural bases of cognitive, emotional, and social processes, and they offer new insights into the complex interplay between IT and information processing, d...
Article
Previous research indicates that perceived usefulness is a major determinant and predictor of intentions to use computers in the workplace. In contrast, the impact of enjoyment on usage intentions has not been examined. Two studies are reported concerning the relative effects of usefulness and enjoyment on intentions to use, and usage of, computers...
Article
Full-text available
Decision makers facing a multiple prospect, which is a bundle of single prospects, are influenced by whether outcome information is framed narrowly (segregated) or broadly (aggregated). The present research hypothesizes perceived riskiness and perceived ambiguity as two distinct mediators of the effect of broad versus narrow prospect framing on dec...
Article
Previous research indicates that decision makers are often reluctant to use potentially beneficial multi-criteria decision support systems (MCDSS). Prior research has not examined the specific impact of preference elicitation techniques on user acceptance of MCDSS. The present research begins to fill this gap by examining the effect on users’ MCDSS...
Article
Full-text available
Effective computer skill training is vital to organizational productivity. Two experiments (N = 288) demonstrated that the behavior modeling approach to computer skill training could be substantially improved by incorporating symbolic mental rehearsal (SMR). SMR is a specific form of mental rehearsal that establishes a cognitive link between visual...
Article
Full-text available
Errors in requirements specifications have been identified as a major contributor to costly software project failures. It would be highly beneficial if information systems developers could verify requirements by predicting workplace acceptance of a new system based on user evaluations of its specifications measured during the earliest stages of the...
Article
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Information technology (IT) acceptance research has yielded many competing models, each with different sets of acceptance determinants. In this paper, we (1) review user acceptance literature and discuss eight prominent models, (2) empiri- cally compare the eight models and their exten- sions, (3) formulate a unified model that integrates elements...
Article
Full-text available
Computer skills are key to organizational performance, and past research indicates that behavior modeling is a highly effective form of computer skill training.The present research develops and tests a new theoretical model of the underlying observational learning processes by which modeling-based training interventions influence computer task perf...
Article
Seeking to improve software development, many organizations attempt to deploy formalized methodologies. This typically entails substantial behavioral change by software developers away from previous informal practices toward conformance with the methodology. Developers' resistance to such change often results in failure to fully deploy and realize...
Article
Full-text available
Many organizations attempt to deploy methodologies intended to improve software development processes. However, resistance by individual software developers against using such methodologies often obstructs their successful deployment. To better explain why individual developers accept or resist methodologies, five theoretical models of individual i...
Article
Full-text available
The present research develops and tests a theoretical extension of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) that explains perceived usefulness and usage intentions in terms of social influence and cognitive instrumental processes. The extended model, referred to as TAM2, was tested using longitudinal data collected regarding four different systems at...
Article
The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) is widely used by researchers and practitioners to predict and explain user acceptance of information technologies. TAM models system usage intentions and behavior as a function of perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. The original scales for measuring the TAM constructs have been confirmed to be reli...
Article
A wide array of decision rules capable of significantly enhancing decision-making performance across a range of tasks has been available for many years. Unfortunately, decision makers have stubbornly resisted using them. The present research investigates factors that might encourage decision rule use. In a simulated production planning task, 157 su...
Conference Paper
The measurement scales for the perceived usefulness and perceived ease of we constructs introduced by Davis (12/ have become widely used for forecasting user acceptance of emerging information technologies. An experiment was conducted to examine whether grouping of items caused artifactual inflation of reliability and validity measures. We found su...
Article
Decision makers have expanding access to business information via computerized news retrieval systems. A greater understanding is needed about how this news retrieval information influences their performance and confidence. MBA students from an advanced finance course forecasted stock earnings using a computerized information system designed to sim...
Article
Recent empirical evidence indicates that computer-assisted what-if analysis does not predictably improve decision making. Why then is what-if analysis so widely used by decision makers? We argue that what-if analysis creates an "illusion of control" which leads decision makers to overestimate its effectiveness. A between-subjects experiment was con...
Article
Decision support systems continue to be very popular in business, despite mixed research evidence as to their effectiveness. We hypothesize that what-if analysis, a prominent feature of most decision support systems, creates an “illusion of control” causing users to overestimate its effectiveness. Two experiments involving a production planning tas...
Article
Lack of user acceptance has long been an impediment to the success of new information systems. The present research addresses why users accept or reject information systems and how user acceptance is affected by system design features. The technology acceptance model (TAM) specifies the causal relationships between system design features, perceived...
Article
Full-text available
The present study presents evidence that standard 7-point behavioral intention (61) scales, including those recommended by Fishbein and Ajzen (e.g., Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980), actually measure behavioral expectation (BE) much of the time. Three experiments, in which a total of 203 American students were used as subjects, spanned two distinct methodol...
Article
Full-text available
Beliefs, attitudes, and intentions are important factors in the adoption of computer technologies. While contemporary representations have focused on explaining the act of using computers, the role of learning to use the computer needs to be better understood within the overall adoption process. Inadequate learning can curtail the adoption and use...
Article
Researchers have widely accepted the argument that the Fishbein model generally predicts better if the intention measure corresponds to the predicted behavior with respect to target, action, context, and time frame. Although the model is routinely applied in situations involving choice among multiple alternatives, researchers frequently overlook th...
Article
Despite the development of increasingly sophisticated and refined multicriteria decision-making (MCDM) methods, an examination of the experimental evidence indicates that users most often prefer relatively unsophisticated methods. In this paper, we synthesize theories and empirical findings from the psychology of judgment and choice to provide a ne...
Conference Paper
The research presented hypothesizes that what-if analysis creates an `illusion of control' which causes people to overestimate its effectiveness. The study reported found that what-if analysis improved performance for about half of the subjects and degraded performance for the rest in a simulated production scheduling task. However, all subjects bu...
Article
Full-text available
Valid measurement scales for predicting user acceptance of computers are in short supply. Most subjective measures used in practice are unvalidated, and their relationship to system usage is unknown. The present research develops and validates new scales for two specific variables, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, which are hypothesi...
Article
Full-text available
A study developed and validated new scales for perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, which were hypothesized to be fundamental determinants of user acceptance. The definitions of the 2 variables were used to develop scale items that were pretested for content validity. The items were then tested for reliability and construct validity in 2...