Franz Gatzweiler

Franz Gatzweiler
University of Bonn | Uni Bonn · ZEF B - Department of Economic and Technological Change

Dr.

About

38
Publications
13,966
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553
Citations

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Full-text available
The form of human settlements impacts on planetary health, population health and health equity. Yet goals for urban and territorial planning are only tangentially linked to public health outcomes. The WHO and UN-Habitat support actions to bring health to the fore in planning and design of human settlements, recently publishing ‘Integrating Health i...
Book
Full-text available
In this little book we explain in which health condition cities and people living in cities are in today, why health is a systemic concept and what we can gain from applying systems thinking to cities, what a systems approach to urban health means in general and specifically applied to urban health equity and we provide some examples of initiatives...
Article
Full-text available
Human health and wellbeing and the health of the biosphere are inextricably linked. The state of Earth’s life-support systems, including freshwater, oceans, land, biodiversity, atmosphere, and climate, affect human health. At the same time, human activities are adversely affecting natural systems. This review paper is the outcome of an interdiscipl...
Article
Statement by the scientific committee* of the International Science Council’s Programme on Urban Health and Wellbeing, on critical elements of urban health action in response to the epidemic.
Article
We aim to investigate the governance challenges of many Chinese urban governments to co-deliver migrant integration and urban green space provision. In specific, we examine the existing institutional arrangements applied in the Haizhu Wetland Park Project in Guangzhou and the consequential marginality. Why is it challenging for many urban governmen...
Article
Full-text available
On 11 March 2020, COVID-19 was officially characterized as a pandemic. By this time, the SARS-CoV-2 virus had already spread across continents, causing significant morbidity and mortality, and affecting social and economic systems. The complexities of the impact of COVID-19 call for multidisciplinary to trans-disciplinary research that goes beyond...
Chapter
Integrating health indicators into all policies and implementing integrated systems governance could effectively address multiple change challenges by creating health co-benefits. The guiding principles of the urban planning system need to be inclusive of health.
Chapter
Complex problems of urban health and wellbeing cause millions of premature deaths annually and are beyond the reach of individual problem-solving capabilities. Collective and artificial intelligence (CI + AI) working together can address the complex challenges of urban health.
Chapter
Full-text available
Cities are experiencing multiple impacts from global environmental change, and the degree to which they will need to cope with and adapt to these challenges will continue to increase. We argue that a ‘complex systems and resilience management’ view may significantly help guide future urban development through innovative integration of, for example,...
Article
Full-text available
CITY KNOW-HOW Human health and planetary health are both influenced by city lifestyles, city leadership, and city development. For both, worrying trends are leading to increasing concern. It is imperative that both become core foci in urban policy. Changing the trajectory will require concerted action. The journal Cities & Health journal is dedicat...
Article
From a complexity science perspective, urban health and well-being challenges emerge due to the complexity of urban systems. Adverse urban health outcomes emerge from failing to respond to that complexity by taking a systems approach in knowledge and action which would open opportunity spaces for human agents to create benefits which in turn would...
Chapter
The marginality concept calls for the integration of poverty concepts with those of social exclusion, geography, and ecology. The difficulties in reaching people at the margins of systems are explained by a set of distances, (i.e., physical distances such as being located in remote or harsh environments), social distances (being excluded, discrimin...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter presents an interdisciplinary framework for the investigation of marginality which is inclusive of the diversity of existing poverty research approaches. Marginality is presented as a systemic and evolutionary concept with particular reference to the role of institutions that constrain or motivate actions as measured against a performa...
Chapter
Full-text available
The authors analyze the concept of marginality from an ecological perspective and provide examples of some mechanisms of marginalization. Marginalization cannot solely be described as an ecological phenomenon, but rather occurs via the interplay of ecological and social aspects of complex arrangements. Hence the use of socio-ecological systems as a...
Chapter
In the relationship between biodiversity and cultural ecosystem services, biodiversity enables the provision of "cultural ecosystem services" which are beneficial for human use and culture and its institutions provide a social lens through which ecosystem services are perceived and valued.The article explores the linkages between biodiversity and c...
Working Paper
Full-text available
The need to address extreme poverty from the perspective of marginality arises from the frustration that the number of the poorest and hungry remains unacceptably high. This triggered the call for an innovative approach from the side of science and action. The conceptual and analytical framework developed here views marginality as a root cause of...
Article
Full-text available
Coffea arabica originates from montane forests in South and Southwest Ethiopia, part of the Eastern Afromontane biodiversity hotspot region. Wild coffee refers to coffee that grows and regenerates spontaneously in these forests and that is genetically different from commercial cultivars. Wild coffee is collected as a non-timber forest product both...
Article
This paper aims at explaining the importance of the democracy stance as compared to the efficiency stance in order to deal with complexity in biodiversity conservation. While the efficiency stance refers to the realm of relatively simple systems, individual rationality, and instrumental values, the complexity stance transcends these boundaries into...
Article
Ethiopian montane rainforests are economically valuable repositories of biodiversity, especially of wild Coffea arabica populations, and they are vanishing at accelerating rates. Our research results confirm theory which explains biodiversity loss by diverging private and social net benefits from land conversion. Poor farmers basically live from ha...
Article
Whereas the economic value of genetic diversity is widely recognized there are, to date, relatively few experiences with the actual valuation of genetic resources. This paper presents an analysis of the economic value of Coffea arabica genetic resources contained in Ethiopian highland forests. The valuation is based on an assessment of the potentia...
Article
The core question this paper attempts to address is how social organization needs to respond to biodiversity features and functions in order to achieve its sustainable use. Scholars have suggested that the governance of complex systems should be dispersed across multiple centers of authority and that any regulative system needs as much variety in t...
Article
"This paper aims to explain why it is important to move from economic efficiency to complexity-led approaches for the purpose of biodiversity conservation. Economic values of biodiversity are not a sufficient reason for deciding to conserve biodiversity. Achieving economic efficiency requires the internalization of values of biodiversity which are...
Article
Building institutions of sustainability which are able to govern the many resource problems in Central and Eastern European agriculture and environment requires time and coordination. Time is needed to respond to the complexity and diversity of agri-environmental resource problems and coordination is required to make the institutions work across di...
Article
The predominant notion on institutionalising biodiversity conservation is that as a result of the features and functions of biodiversity as well as the attributes of the actors, institutional diversity and multi-level governance are required. Institutional diversity per se, however, is not a panacea for successful biodiversity conservation and even...
Article
"The predominant notion on institutionalising biodiversity conservation is that as a result of the features and functions of biodiversity as well as the attributes of the actors, institutional diversity and multi-level governance are required. Institutional diversity per se, however, is not a panacea for successful biodiversity conservation and eve...
Article
"In this paper, the author discusses two different beliefs of how institutional change towards sustainability in agriculture and environment works: the institutional view and the evolutionary view. Both perspectives are studied in the context of restructuring the agricultural sectors and rural environments in Central and Eastern European Countries...
Article
This paper aims at explaining the role and importance of the evolution of institutions for sustainable agri-environmental resources during the transition process by referring to examples of agri-environmental problem areas in Central and Eastern European Countries (CEECs). It is often stated that the mere replacement of institutional structures in...
Article
Full-text available
"The aim of this paper is to develop a comprehensive conceptual framework for the analysis of institutions, policies and farming systems for agri-environmental sustainability in Central and Eastern European countries in transition. The basic unit of analysis is the 'agri-environmental action scenario'. The action scenario consists of a set of compo...
Article
The exploitation and conversion of forest ecosystems is often explained by economists as being the result of an undervaluation of the goods and services provided by the forest. The line of argumentation continues and says that in order to sustain forest environments the goods and services they provide should be valued. However, in their quest to va...
Article
"This paper aims at explaining the role and importance of the evolution of institutions for sustainable agrienvironments during the transition process by referring to examples of agri-environmental problems faced in Central and Eastern European countries. It is often stated that the replacement of institutional structures in post socialist countrie...
Article
"Sustaining biodiversity requires economizing at multiple levels of social analysis. The multiplicity refers to social and ecological system attributes and needs to be reflected by a diversity of institutions at multiple scales. This paper identifies key attributes of social and ecological systems which need to be taken into account in order to des...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Scholars argue that because cities are heterotrophs, they are not. What about solar energy generation? Can that be considered an autotroph process? How can anything be autotroph if the 2nd law applies to all? The second law of thermodynamics according to which ALL systems eventually dissipate, also natural ecosystems. Why are humans not just another species on earth and the cities they are building "urban ecosystems"?