Frankie Fong

Frankie Fong
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology | EVA · Department of Comparative Cultural Psychology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

10
Publications
648
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14
Citations
Introduction

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Cross-cultural research provides invaluable information about the origins of and explanations for cognitive and behavioral diversity. Interest in cross-cultural research is growing, but the field continues to be dominated by WEIRD (Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic) researchers conducting WEIRD science with WEIRD participants,...
Article
Full-text available
Self-regulation is a widely studied construct, generally assumed to be cognitively supported by executive functions (EFs). There is a lack of clarity and consensus over the roles of specific components of EFs in self-regulation. The current study examines the relations between performance on a) a self-regulation task (Heads, Toes, Knees Shoulders T...
Article
Robots are an increasingly prevalent presence in children’s lives. However, little is known about the ways in which children learn from robots and whether they do so in the same way as they learn from humans. To investigate this, we adapted a previously established imitation paradigm centered on inefficient tool use. Children (3- to 6-year-olds; N...
Article
Full-text available
We report on a study in which 4- to 6-year-olds were presented with a sticker-retrieval task and asked to choose between one of two tools they could use to complete it. One of the tools was efficient but verbally identified to be the one that “nobody” uses; the other option was less efficient, but children were told it was the tool that “everybody”...
Article
Full-text available
Human behaviors are greatly influenced by social norms, with children developing a propensity for high-fidelity imitation from a young age. We evaluated the extent to which, in a tool-using task, children conform to a sub-optimal approach when a more efficient alternative is available. Participants were sampled from an urban city in Australia, and...
Article
Full-text available
Children recognise the social value of imitation but do not opt for tools that are ‘normative’ if they are also dysfunctional. We investigated whether children would replicate a normative method in a tool‐learning task if it was instrumentally functional but less efficient than an alternative. Four‐ to six‐year‐old children were presented with a st...
Chapter
Since the proliferation of television sets into households began over half a century ago there has been widespread interest in the impact that viewing has on young children's development. Such interest has grown with the increasing availability of smart phones and tablets. In this review we examine the literature documenting human social learning a...
Article
Children selectively imitate in‐group over outgroup individuals under certain experimental conditions. We investigated whether this bias applies to gender in‐groups in China. Three‐ and five‐year‐olds were shown how to operate novel objects by same‐gender and opposite‐gender models. Results indicate that the combination of verbally highlighting the...
Article
This study tested potential mediating effects of household screen media experience (HSME) on the relationship between SES and six aspects of preschooler’s sociality: social cognition, independence, aggression, social adaptivity, peer relationship and emotional control. A total of 471 parents of 3- to 6-year-old children completed an online question...

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