Frank Takken

Frank Takken
University of Amsterdam | UVA · Department of Cardiovascular Pathology

PhD

About

170
Publications
39,306
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
7,519
Citations
Citations since 2017
44 Research Items
3628 Citations
20172018201920202021202220230200400600
20172018201920202021202220230200400600
20172018201920202021202220230200400600
20172018201920202021202220230200400600
Introduction
Frank Takken currently works at the Molecular Plant Pathology group of the University of Amsterdam. Frank does research in Plant Pathology, Microbiology, Biotechnology and Molecular Biology. His major research interest is to elucidate molecular mechanism underlying disease resistance in plants. He focusses on three mechanism conferring biotic stress resistance: resistance genes, susceptibility genes encoding host effector targets and biocontrol conferred by fungal endophytes.
Additional affiliations
October 2016 - July 2021
University of Amsterdam
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
April 2001 - October 2016
University of Amsterdam
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (170)
Preprint
Full-text available
Nucleotide-binding Leucine Rich repeat-type immune receptors (NLRs) are intracellular proteins that sense the presence of pathogen-derived elicitors and subsequently trigger an immune response. NLR proteins have to be strictly regulated as immune responses typically result in death of affected host cells. Regulation mechanisms of NLR activation are...
Article
Full-text available
Pathogens produce effector proteins to manipulate their hosts. While most effectors act autonomously, some fungal effectors act in pairs and rely on each other for function. During the colonization of the plant vasculature, the root-infecting fungus Fusarium oxysporum (Fo) produces 14 so-called Secreted in Xylem (SIX) effectors. Two of these effect...
Article
Full-text available
Plant pathogens employ secreted proteins, among which are effectors, to manipulate and colonize their hosts. A large fraction of effectors is translocated into host cells, where they can suppress defense signaling. Bacterial pathogens directly inject effectors into host cells via the type three secretion system, but it is little understood how euka...
Article
Full-text available
The fungus Fusarium oxysporum (Fo) is widely known for causing wilt disease in over 100 different plant species. Endophytic interactions of Fo with plants are much more common, and strains pathogenic on one plant species can even be beneficial endophytes on another species. However, endophytic and beneficial interactions have been much less investi...
Article
Full-text available
Many plant intracellular immune receptors mount a Hypersensitive Response (HR) upon pathogen perception. The concomitant localised cell death is proposed to trap pathogens, such as viruses, inside infected cells preventing their spread. Notably, extreme resistance (ER) conferred by the potato immune receptor Rx1 to potato virus X (PVX) does not inv...
Article
Fusarium spp. cause severe economic damage in many crops, exemplified by Panama Disease of banana or Fusarium head blight of wheat. Plants sense immunogenic patterns (termed elicitors) at the cell surface to initiate pattern‐triggered immunity (PTI). Knowledge of fungal elicitors and corresponding plant immune‐signaling is incomplete but could yiel...
Article
Full-text available
Fusarium oxysporum (Fo) is best known as a host‐specific vascular pathogen causing major crop losses. Most Fo strains, however, are root endophytes potentially conferring endophyte‐mediated resistance (EMR). EMR is a mechanistically poorly understood root‐specific induced resistance response induced by endophytic or nonhost pathogenic Fo strains. L...
Article
Full-text available
Plants in their natural environment are inevitably subject to diseases caused by pathogenic microbes and pests. To survive and combat these threats, plants have evolved a sophisticated immune system. The plant immune system comprises of two layers of defense (pathogen-associated molecular patterns -triggered immunity [PTI] and effector-triggered im...
Article
Full-text available
Endophytic microbes conferring biocontrol are an eco-friendly alternative to control diseases in crops. Unfortunately, the use of endophytes to control diseases is not yet widespread as their application in agricultural settings is challenging and the outcome variable. Translating strains that perform well under laboratory conditions to the field p...
Article
Full-text available
Although the vascular pathogen Fusarium oxysporum (Fo) is notorious for being the causal agent of Fusarium wilt disease, the vast majority of Fo strains are harmless soil and root colonisers. The latter Fo’s are often endophytes colonising roots intracellularly without negatively affecting plant fitness. Actually, most of them, like Fo47, are benef...
Article
Full-text available
Plant NLR proteins enable the immune system to recognise and respond to pathogen attack. An early consequence of immune activation is transcriptional reprogramming. Some NLRs have been shown to act in the nucleus and interact with transcription factors. The Rx1 NLR protein of potato binds and distorts double-stranded DNA. However, the components of...
Article
Full-text available
Specificity in the plant immune system is mediated by Resistance (R) proteins. Most R genes encode intracellular NLR-type immune receptors and these pathogen sensors require helper NLRs to activate immune signaling upon pathogen perception. Resistance conferred by many R genes is temperature sensitive and compromised above 28 • C. Many Solanaceae R...
Article
Full-text available
Plant pathogens use effector proteins to promote host colonization. The mode of action of effectors from root invading pathogens, such as Fusarium oxysporum (Fo), is poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether Fo effectors suppress pattern‐triggered immunity (PTI), and whether they enter host cells during infection. ‐ Eight candidate effectors...
Article
Full-text available
Root colonization by Fusarium oxysporum (Fo) endophytes reduces wilt disease symptoms caused by pathogenic Fo strains. The endophytic strain Fo47, isolated from wilt suppressive soils, reduces Fusarium wilt in various crop species such as tomato, flax, and asparagus. How endophyte-mediated resistance (EMR) against Fusarium wilt is achieved is uncle...
Article
Full-text available
Interactions between plants and the root-colonizing fungus Fusarium oxysporum (Fo) can be neutral, beneficial, or detrimental for the host. Fo is infamous for its ability to cause wilt, root-, and foot-rot in many plant species, including many agronomically important crops. However, Fo also has another face; as a root endophyte, it can reduce disea...
Article
Full-text available
This article is a Commentary on Sarkar et al., 224: 886–901.
Poster
Full-text available
Intracellular NLR (nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat)-type immune receptors are a fundamental part of the plants’ immune system. We introduced a robust experimental system in Nicotiana benthamiana to investigate downstream responses triggered by these receptor proteins called CESSNA (Controlled Expression of effectors for Synchronized and Syst...
Article
Full-text available
Root endophytes can confer resistance against plant pathogens by direct antagonism or via the host by triggering induced resistance. The latter response typically relies on jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET)-depended signaling pathways, but can also be triggered via salicylic acid (SA)-dependent signaling pathways. Here, we set out to determine if en...
Article
Cell-to-cell movement of proteins through plasmodesmata is a widely-established mechanism for intercellular signaling in plants. Current techniques to study intercellular protein translocation rely on single-cell transformation using particle bombardment or transgenic lines expressing photo-inducible fluorophores. The method presented here allows v...
Article
Full-text available
The ability to induce a defense response after pathogen attack is a critical feature of the immune system of any organism. Nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat receptors (NLRs) are key players in this process and perceive the occurrence of nonself-activities or foreign molecules. In plants, coevolution with a variety of pests and pathogens has re...
Article
Full-text available
Resistance (R) genes and endophytic organisms can both protect plants against pathogens. Although the outcome of both processes is the same, little is known about the commonalities and differences between both immune responses. Here we set out to phenotypically characterize both responses in the tomato-Fusarium pathosystem, and to identify markers...
Data
EMR and RMR reduce susceptibility to Fusarium wilt (Fol007). (A) Ten-days-old seedlings of Fol007-susceptible KG52201 and Fol007-resistant KG324 were root dip-inoculated with water (mock), Fol007 or a mixture of Fo47:Fol007 (25 replicates for Fo47:Fol007 co-inoculated KG52201 and Fol007-inoculated KG324 seedlings, 10 replicates for the control trea...
Data
Fo47 inoculation affects accumulation of specific proteins. (A) Proteins that were detected in at least three out of four replicates where labeled as present. Treatments embraced mock-inoculated, Fo47-inoculated, Fo47:Fol007-coinoculated and Fol007-inoculated C32 susceptible tomato plants. The black circle marks proteins that were specifically pres...
Data
List of PR-5 proteins found in xylem sap of both bioassays. Uniprot IDs, names of the proteins, average of LFQ intensities for every treatment of the two bioassays, predicted location, GO category, disulphide bonds and length of the proteins are depicted in the table. LFQ values are represented in Log10 scale.
Data
EMR and RMR reduce susceptibility to Fusarium wilt (Fol007). (A) Ten-days-old seedlings of Fol007-susceptible KG52201 and Fol007-resistant KG324 were root dip-inoculated with water (mock), Fol007 or a mixture of Fo47:Fol007 (25 replicates for Fo47:Fol007 co-inoculated KG52201 and Fol007-inoculated KG324 seedlings, 10 replicates for the control trea...
Data
List of xylem sap proteins whose relative abundance changes upon co-inoculation of tomato with Fo47:Fol007 comparing to Fo47-inoculated.
Data
Overview of the peptides matching NP24 and PR-5x proteins.
Data
Fo47 colonizes tomato stems (A) To monitor stem colonization by Fo47 3-weeks-post-inoculation, stem sections at the crown and cotyledon-level were placed on PDA plates (10 replicates). Plates were scanned after 4 days of incubation. (B) Fungal outgrowth of the stem sections plotted as a percentage of infected sections. The experiment was repeated t...
Data
Fol007 proteins identified and label-free quantified in Bioassay 1. LFQ values are in Log10 scale and 3,9 represent the LFQ cutoff.
Data
Tomato proteins identified and label-free quantified in Bioassay 2. Samples labeled as ‘Mock’ for the water control, and ‘Patho’ for Fol007-inoculated KG324 resistant tomato plants. DAPs are marked with +. LFQ values are represented in Log10 scale. Sequence coverage (%), molecular weight (KDa), GO description and SecretomeP and ApoplastP outputs ar...
Data
Overview of the protein groups detected peptides overlapping with NP24 and PR-5x. Filled in green the LFQ intensities obtained by only using unique peptides for the protein quantification. LFQ intensities are represented in Log10 scale.
Data
Tomato proteins identified and label-free quantified in Bioassay 1. Samples labeled as ‘Mock’ for the water control, and ‘Endo,’ ‘Coinoc’ and ‘Patho’ for Fo47-inoculated, Fo47:Fol007-coinoculated and Fol007-inoculated C32 susceptible tomato plants. DAPs are marked with +. LFQ values are represented in Log10 scale. Sequence coverage (%), molecular w...
Article
Full-text available
Intracellular NLR (nucleotide‐binding leucine‐rich repeat)‐type immune receptors are a fundamental aspect of plant immune systems. As infection occurs at foci, activation of immune responses is typically non‐uniform and non‐synchronized, hampering the systematic dissection of their cellular effects and determining their phasing. We investigated the...
Article
Full-text available
The plant immune system employs resistance (R) genes to detect the presence of pathogenic microbes by the avirulence (Avr) factors they produce. Whereas some R-genes confer extreme resistance, completely blocking pathogen proliferation, others act later during infection and allow initial microbial multiplication in the host. We hypothesized that tr...
Article
Pathogens use effector proteins to manipulate their hosts. During infection of tomato the fungus Fusarium oxysporum secretes the effectors Avr2 and Six5. Whereas Avr2 suffices to trigger I-2-mediated cell death in heterologous systems, both effectors are required for I-2-mediated disease resistance in tomato. How Six5 participates in triggering res...
Article
Full-text available
Plant NLR proteins enable the immune system to recognise and respond to pathogen attack. An early consequence of immune activation is transcriptional reprogramming and some NLRs have been shown to act in the nucleus and interact with transcription factors. The Rx1 NLR protein of potato is further able to bind and distort double-stranded DNA. Howeve...
Data
Fig. S1 ΔspAvr2 R45H complements the virulence defect of a FolΔAvr2 strain. Fig. S2 Side‐by‐side representations of the structures of Avr2 and its structural homologs: human Speckle‐type POZ protein, human TRAF6 and human SIAH1. Fig. S3 Overlays of the structure of Avr2 with structural homologs; Ptr‐ToxA, human Speckle‐type POZ protein, human TRA...
Article
Plant pathogens employ effector proteins to manipulate their hosts. Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), the causal agent of tomato wilt disease, produces effector protein Avr2. Besides being a virulence factor, Avr2 triggers immunity in I‐2 carrying tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Fol strains that evade I‐2 recognition carry point mutations...
Article
Full-text available
Arabidopsis thaliana mlo2 mlo6 mlo12 triple mutant plants exhibit complete immunity against infection by otherwise virulent obligate biotrophic powdery mildew fungi such as Golovinomyces orontii. While this phenotype is well documented, the interaction profile of the triple mutant with other microbes is underexplored and incomplete. Here, we thorou...
Article
A recent study finds that the Arabidopsis DM1 and DM2d proteins physically interact and trigger autoimmunity in plants. The DM1–DM2d interaction pattern differs from that of known immune receptor pairs, portraying the versatility in NLR functioning.
Article
Full-text available
Phytohormones such as salicylic acid (SA), ethylene (ET) and jasmonic acid (JA) play key roles in plant defense following pathogen attack. Involvement of these hormones in susceptibility following Fusarium oxysporum (Fo) infection has mostly been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana. Fo, however, causes vascular wilt disease in a broad range of crops, i...
Article
Full-text available
Pathogens secrete effector proteins to manipulate the host for their own proliferation. Currently it is unclear whether the uptake of effector proteins from extracellular spaces is a host autonomous process. We study this process using the Avr2 effector protein from Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol). Avr2 is an important virulence factor...
Data
Presence of Avr2 and I-2 gene in ΔspAvr2/I-2 and Avr2/I-2 tomato plants. (A) Ethidium bromide stained agarose gel showing the PCR products obtained with either Avr2 or I-2 specific primers using DNA extracted from the indicated plants. The GeneRuler 1 kb DNA Ladder (Fermentas) is shown on the left. (B) Western blot analysis shows accumulation of Av...
Article
Full-text available
Somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases (SERKs) are transmembrane receptors involved in plant immunity. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum; Sl) carries three SERK members. One of these, SlSERK1, is required for Mi-1.2-mediated resistance to potato aphids (Macrosiphum euphorbiae). Mi-1.2, encodes a coiled-coil nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein...
Article
Full-text available
Plants interact with a huge variety of soil microbes, ranging from pathogenic to mutualistic. The Fusarium oxysporum (Fo) species complex consists of ubiquitous soil inhabiting fungi that can infect and cause disease in over 120 different plant species including tomato, banana, cotton and Arabidopsis. However, in many cases Fo colonization remains...
Article
Full-text available
Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognise and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are...
Article
Full-text available
Plant pathogens secrete small proteins, of which some are effectors that promote infection. During colonization of the tomato xylem vessels the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (Fol) secretes small proteins that are referred to as SIX (Secreted In Xylem) proteins. Of these, Six1 (Avr3), Six3 (Avr2), Six5, and Six6 are required for full v...
Article
Full-text available
Plant NLR proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus, however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously we noted a structural homology between the NB domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC domain of the...
Article
Plant-invading microbes betray their presence to a plant by exposure of antigenic molecules such as small, secreted proteins called ‘effectors’. In Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) we identified a pair of effector gene candidates, AVR2-SIX5, whose expression is controlled by a shared promoter. The pathogenicity of AVR2 and SIX5 Fol knock...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
There are 22 additional places for researchers to attend the meeting (registration 350 €, accommodation ~ 350 €). Please send title and abstract (250 words) to Simone Gieraths (gieraths@mpipz.mpg.de) by Feb. 20th 2015 for selection by Feb. 27th 2015. Advanced PhD and postdoctoral scientists are especially encouraged to apply.
Article
To confer resistance against pathogens and pests in plants, typically dominant resistance genes are deployed. However, because resistance is based on recognition of a single pathogen-derived molecular pattern these narrowspectrum genes are usually readily overcome. Disease arises from a compatible interaction between plant and pathogen. Hence, alte...
Article
Plant pathogens secrete effectors to manipulate their host and facilitate colonization. Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (Fol) is the causal agent of Fusarium wilt disease in tomato. Upon infection Fol secretes numerous small proteins into the xylem sap (Six proteins). Most Six proteins are unique to F. oxysporum, but Six6 is an exception; a ho...
Article
Full-text available
Receptor(-like) kinases with Lysin Motif (LysM) domains in their extracellular region play crucial roles during plant interactions with microorganisms; e.g. Arabidopsis thaliana CERK1 activates innate immunity upon perception of fungal chitin/chitooligosaccharides, whereas Medicago truncatula NFP and LYK3 mediate signalling upon perception of bacte...
Data
Effect of the Thr 480 Ala substitution on MtLYK3 autophosphorylation activity in vitro. The purified intracellular regions of WT MtLYK3, MtLYK3[G334E], and MtLYK3[T480A], fused to the C terminus of GST, were analyzed for their autophosphorylation activity in vitro using radiolabeled ATP (γ-32P ATP) and phosphorimaging (PI). The coomassie blue stain...
Data
Various (putative) phosphorylation sites are differentially required for MtLYK3 biological activity in Nicotiana. MtLYK3-sYFP2 mutated variants were co-produced with MtNFP-mCherry fusion in Nicotiana leaves: MtLYK3[T285A S286A T300A]+MtNFP (1); MtLYK3[T433A]+MtNFP (2); MtLYK3[T512A]+MtNFP (3); MtLYK3[T480A]+MtNFP (4). Macroscopic observation (left...
Data
Subcellular localization of various protein fusions in Nicotiana leaf epidermal cells. The plasma membrane marker, mCherry-HVR, was co-produced with the designated fusions in Nicotiana leaf epidermal cells, and the fluorescence (viewed from abaxial side) was imaged 24 hai using confocal laser scanning microscopy. From left to right: green fluoresce...
Article
Full-text available
Plant pathogens secrete effector proteins to promote host colonization. During infection of tomato xylem vessels, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) secretes the Avr2 effector protein. Besides being a virulence factor, Avr2 is recognized intracellularly by the tomato I-2 resistance protein, resulting in the induction of host defenses. Here...
Article
Full-text available
Background The plant-pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f.sp.lycopersici (Fol) has accessory, lineage-specific (LS) chromosomes that can be transferred horizontally between strains. A single LS chromosome in the Fol4287 reference strain harbors all known Fol effector genes. Transfer of this pathogenicity chromosome confers virulence to a previous...
Data
A putative secondary metabolite gene cluster of Fol is expressed during tomato infection. Roots of ten days old susceptible (without resistance genes) tomato seedlings were inoculated with conidiospores of Fol004. Roots were harvested 8 dpi (days post inoculation). From the collected roots RNA was extracted and (RT-) PCR was performed to detect tra...
Data
Detailed annotation of the Fol4287 pathogenicity chromosome.
Data
Significance of the association between the TCGGCA element and upstream regions of effector genes.
Data
Complex repeat structure in SIX8, SIX8b and SIX14 upstream regions. The most upstream sequence shared between the SIX8 and SIX8b loci (dark grey, blue and green highlighted) is more similar between SIX8 and SIX8b loci than the coding sequences and the immediate upstream sequences (light grey). The SIX8b upstream region is the most complex. Compared...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing numbers of infectious crop diseases that are caused by fungi and oomycetes urge the need to develop alternative strategies for resistance breeding. As an alternative for the use of resistance (R) genes, the application of mutant susceptibility (S) genes has been proposed as a potentially more durable type of resistance. Identification of...
Chapter
Full-text available
Introduction Building Blocks of NB-LRRs; Classification and Structural Features of Subdomains Putting the Parts Together: Combining the Domains to Build a Signaling Competent NB-LRR Protein Stabilization and Accumulation of NB-LRR Proteins: Their Maturation and Stabilization When the Pathogen Attacks: Perception and Signaling by NB-LRR Proteins Con...
Data
Full-text available
Analysis of cell death inducing activity of epitope-tagged MLA10 fragments. (A) Analysis of cell death inducing activity of MLA10 CC with various epitope tags. MLA10 CC alone or fused with different C-terminal tag (-3×HA, -3×Myc, -mYFP or -TAP) were expressed by agro-infiltration in N. benthamiana leaves, and cell-death triggered by each fusion was...
Data
Full-text available
Analyses of subcellular localization and cell death activity of MLA10-YFP-GR without Dex treatment. MLA10-YFP-GR was expressed in N. benthamiana leaves by Agro-infiltration. Confocal images were taken at ∼24 hpi (left panel). Trypan blue staining was done at ∼48 hpi post Agro-infiltration to reveal cell-death phenotype (right panel). GR: Steroid bi...
Data
Analysis of cell death inducing activity of MLA10 mutant variants in barley cells through transient gene expression assay. (DOC)
Data
Full-text available
Subcellular localization of YFP fusions of MLA10 CC and FL mutant variants. Indicated YFP fusions of MLA10 CC mutant variants were expressed respectively in N. benthamiana leaves by Agro-infiltration, and confocal images were taken at ∼24 hpi post infiltration (upper panel). Indicated YFP fusions of MLA10 FL variants were delivered into barley epid...
Data
Full-text available
Analysis of cell death Inducing activity of MLA10 fusions and mutant variants in barley. The Plasmids of WT MLA10, a MHD motif mutant (D502V), a P-loop mutant (K207R) and two MLA10 fusions (MLA10-NLS and MLA10-NES) were co-expressed respectively with a GFP maker plasmid in barley epidermal cells using biolistic delivery. The histogram bars represen...
Data
Full-text available
Analysis of cell death activity of AVRA10-YFP alone or coexpressing with MLA10-NLS. AVRA10 and MLA10-NLS fusion were expressed alone or coexpressed in N. benthamiana leaf by Agro-infiltration. Confocal image of N. benthamiana cells expressing AVRA10-YFP fusion was taken at ∼36 hrs post infiltration (left panel). Trypan blue staining for cell death...
Data
Full-text available