Frank W Stahnisch

Frank W Stahnisch
The University of Calgary | HBI · Department of Community Health Sciences

Dr.

About

288
Publications
98,874
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628
Citations
Introduction
Dr. Frank W. Stahnisch is a historian of medicine and neuroscience and has received his doctorate from the Free University of Berlin (Germany) in 2001. He holds the "Alberta Medical Foundation/Hannah Professorship in the History of Medicine and Health Care" at the University of Calgary (Canada) and is an Editor-in-Chief of the international "Journal of the History of the Neurosciences" (Taylor & Francis - Routledge Group).
Additional affiliations
July 2016 - present
The University of Calgary
Position
  • Professor (Full)
Description
  • Alberta Medical Foundation/Hannah Professorship in the History of Medicine and Health Care
June 2008 - June 2016
The University of Calgary
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • AMF/Hannah Professorship in the History of Medicine and Health Care
August 2006 - May 2008
McGill University
Position
  • Visiting Assistant Professor

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (7)
Project
outlines and development of entangled fields of behavioral, cognitive and neurosciences in the 2nd half of the 20th century in the Max Planck Society as well as in a global perspective
Project
Research regarding this project focuses on the philosophical, epistemological, and contextual dimensions of the history of experimental physiology and the modern neurosciences. It aims at uncovering some of the cultural and social constellations that have influenced the wider development of experimental physiology, laboratory medicine, and brain research since the late 18th century (particularly France and Germany), the historical relationship between neurology/the neurosciences, and the philosophy of the mind (focus on the German-speaking countries and North America). Furthermore, the relationship between clinical neuroscience (particularly Canada and the United States), the historical epistemology of the life sciences (18th to 21st centuries), and the longer history of visualization practices in biomedicine are explored.