Frank Lechner

Frank Lechner
Emory University | EU · Department of Sociology

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79
Publications
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1,260
Citations

Publications

Publications (79)
Article
Using illustrative passages and comparisons with previous partial translations, this paper reports some problems of accuracy and tone in the complete English translation of Georg Simmel’s sociological magnum opus, Sociology: Inquiries into the Construction of Social Forms. Placing these problems in the context of broader discussions of translation...
Chapter
If anything has inspired faith in America’s exceptional qualities, it is the country’s extraordinary power. Its early leaders envisioned the nation’s growth to unrivaled strength. In the 1830s Tocqueville already thought that Russia and the United States seemed called, as if by a design of Providence, “to hold in [their] hands one day the destinies...
Chapter
There is no business like American show business. Since the 1800s, operating through a variety of media, Americans have pioneered ways of turning arts and entertainment into commercial mass culture. In magazines and moving pictures, in radio and recorded music, in television and on the Internet, they have crafted new cultural products to amuse audi...
Chapter
Americans are an exceptional “people of plenty” (Potter 1954). Since colonial times, North America has promised wealth and opportunity to new settlers. As an independent country, the United States became first a commercial and then an industrial power, overtaking Britain by the early 1900s. During the “American Century,” the U.S. led the way in cre...
Chapter
“Almost an island unto itself.” At least until recently, that metaphor plausibly captured something exceptional about American sports (Eriksen 2007). Americans have long preferred to watch and play sports they regard as distinctly theirs—football, baseball, and basketball most notably. Out of indifference to alien games or a sense of superiority ab...
Chapter
“America is exceptionally religious.” Americans have long believed it; foreigners have marveled at it; most scholars have confirmed it. One of the oldest claims about the American exception still enjoys widespread support. Even in the twenty-first century, after all, while Old Europe steadily loses faith, Americans seem so much more “into” religion...
Chapter
Once upon a time, America was reputed to have an exceptionally small state. In the 1830s, Tocqueville could barely see it. In the decades after his visit, American government lagged in seizing central control of the country. Later observers claimed that Americans were “anti-statist” (Lipset 1996). Their liberal tradition, rooted in the Constitution...
Chapter
What exactly makes the United States exceptional? In a lengthy stream of collective consciousness, Americans have had much to say about the question. A certain story about the country’s exceptional qualities runs through American commentary on American society. The commentary crystallized into a tradition of exceptionalism that shaped how Americans...
Chapter
“The U.S. is an exceptionally litigious society obsessed with law.” More than people in other countries, so runs an argument about the American legal exception, Americans go to court to resolve disputes, rely on law to address social problems, grant special powers to judges, and view many public issues through a distinctly legal lens. The U.S. has...
Book
This book examines what makes the United States an exceptional society, what impact it has had abroad, and why these issues have mattered to Americans. With historical and comparative evidence, Frank J. Lechner describes the distinctive path of American institutions and tracks changes in the country’s national identity in order to assess claims abo...
Book
This book examines what makes the United States an exceptional society, what impact it has had abroad, and why these issues have mattered to Americans. With historical and comparative evidence, Frank J. Lechner describes the distinctive path of American institutions and tracks changes in the country’s national identity in order to assess claims abo...
Chapter
This article explores the origins, development, structure, and impact of world culture in relation to globalization over the past two centuries. It discusses the complex and largely rationalized content of world culture and the rise and proliferation of organizations that generate, debate, and propagate world culture, particularly international non...
Article
The Netherlands is the first concise, authored introduction available on the topic. The Netherlands has been a key entrepot in the world capitalist system for centuries, but because of relatively recent demographic changes, it has become symbolic of the clash of European and Islamic cultures. Perhaps the most secular nation in the world, it now hou...
Chapter
Cultural Theory: Globalization as Reconceptualization and HybridityWorld-System and Related Theories: Globalization as the History of CapitalismWorld Polity Theory: Globalization as the Enactment of World CultureConclusion NotesBibliography
Article
This book explores the development, content, and impact of world culture. Combining several of the most fruitful theoretical perspectives on world culture, including the world polity approach and globalization theory, the book gives a historical treatment of the development of world culture and assesses the complex impact of world culture on people...
Chapter
The Olympic Games and World CultureCulture in World SocietyEnacting World CultureThinking about CultureThinking about CultureContested CultureThe Case for World CultureStructure of the Book
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Half TitleTitleCopyrightContentsList of TablesAcknowledgmentsList of Abbreviations
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Studying World CultureWorld Culture as Ideology of CapitalismWorld Culture as Ontology of World SocietyWorld Culture as Definition of the Global ConditionWorld Culture as the Organization of Diversity
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One WorldActors on the World StageA World of DifferenceImposing World CultureConclusions
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The Earth SummitWorld Meetings and the Construction of World CultureWorld Conferences as Global RitualHuman RightsEnvironmentPopulationWomenConclusions
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Cable Grips the GlobeHardware: Transportation and Communication InfrastructureHardware and World CultureSoftware: International Organizations Integrating, Innovating, and AdvocatingThe Primacy of INGOs in World-Cultural ActivityOrganizational ConnectionsINGO Expansion and Its ImplicationsConclusions
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The Islamist OppositionThe “Clash of Civilizations”World Culture vs. the Clash of CivilizationsFundamentalism and World Culture
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world culture;antiglobalization;international criminal court;cultural development;scientific research
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In Defense of DifferenceDifferences about DifferenceThe Difference Nations MakeConclusions
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World Culture and the ICCAmerica vs. World Culture?The ICC and the Future of World Culture
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Pentecostalism as World CultureAs the Spirit MovesExpanding World Culture
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“Opposed to Neoliberalism”“Another World”A “Great Alliance”Transforming World CultureConclusions
Article
This article uses evidence drawn from Dutch policy arenas to challenge claims about the erosion of national identity due to globalization. More specifically, it complements and revises neoinstitutionalist arguments about the enactment of world culture within nation-states by showing how the redefinition of national identity takes the form of reflex...
Article
Abstract Using the recent history of Dutch soccer as an illustrative case, this article supports a line of argument in globalization studies that generally focuses on the variable reverberations of globalization and more specifically suggests that globalization entails the embattled redefinition of national identities. I show how the involvement of...
Chapter
Religious responses to globalization seem to contribute little to the overall globalization critique put forth in venues such as the World Social Forum. This essay suggests that in the struggle about globalization, religious actors are more important and religious voices more articulate than many have realized. Empirically, this analysis yields a m...
Article
Draft prepared for presentation at the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion meeting, Houston, October 2000. This paper draws on material presented at previous SSSR (1997) and ASR (1998) meetings. Please do not quote without permission.
Article
In Parsons's analysis of citizenship, his general theory, liberal views, and assessment of American society intersect. Drawing from these distinctive sources, Parsons addresses questions still central to the study of citizenship. While Parsons presents a strong case for inclusion by means of liberal citizenship as an integrative force in modern soc...
Article
1.The Institutional Structure of Society. 2.Economy. 3.Economy in Institutional Context. 4.Kinship. 5.Kinship in Institutional Context. 6.Religion. 7.Religion in Institutional Context. 8.Polity. 9.Polity in Institutional Context. 10.Law. 11.Law in Institutional Context. 12.Education. 13.Education in Institutional Context. 14.Fundamental Interchange...
Article
This paper refutes Stark and Iannaccone's recent argument about secularization in Europe as applied to the Netherlands. Relevant Dutch evidence shows that both organized religion and subjective religiosity have declined in the Netherlands since the 1950s. Any deregulation and increases in pluralism that occurred in that period did not have the theo...
Chapter
Fundamentalists are not in search of fundamentals. They have found the Truth. All they seek is a society solidly based on that Truth. Modern society, after all, has veered away from the true path and undermined the sacred tradition. It has offered false gods. It has called into question the very value of fundamentals. Modernity is thus in need of a...
Book
Modernity dissolves absolute certainties; late modernity dissolves them absolutely. In the modern world system there appears to be no firm, unchallenged ground on which to construct a meaningful canopy. But around the world, many individuals and groups long for a kind of cultural coherence that they believe once existed. They search for fundamental...
Article
This article examines the main charges against secularization theory and finds them wanting. Contrary to the recent arguments of various critics, there is a reasonably solid body of secularization theory with valid historical content; secularization cannot be explained away as either institutionalization or transformation; it is neither a selflimit...
Article
What does it mean to be a sociologist? Does it still make sense to “commit a social science”? This essay reflects on the former question and answers the latter affirmatively. It accepts much of Weber’s argument in “Science as a Vocation,” but it goes beyond Weber by suggesting that the practice of sociology is meaningful in ways he did not fully re...
Chapter
Simmel’s work has long been recognized as a major contribution to sociological theory and it has received increasing attention in recent years; yet by comparison with other classical contributions the significance of his work continues to be underestimated. For example, in several recent reinterpretations of classical theory Simmel is barely mentio...
Article
Professor Richard Munch sets out to reformulate the theory of action, a notion central to sociology and one to which all schools of thought within sociology have contributed. He includes an account of Parson's voluntaristic theory of action.
Article
This paper evaluates John Coleman's application of a particular version of secularization theory to Catholicism in the Netherlands. Recent research findings show that many changes in Dutch Catholicism in the last 15 years do not fit Coleman's model. The emerging pattern of radical secularization is linked to aspects of the preceding "pillarized" so...
Article
Applying action-theoretical concepts to historical studies of revitalization movements and Awakenings, this paper proposes an analytical conception of fundamentalism. It is argued that various revitalization episodes in American religious history had fundamentalist aspects but also entailed unintended modernizing consequences. Outlining some of the...
Article
A “romantic syndrome” is defined as that type of anti-modern revitalisation movement which is oriented to resolving the discontents produced by universalistic inclusion in modern societies, by means of reintegration in terms of presumed historical community. The theme, thrust, and internal tensions of ethnic movements are analyzed along lines sugge...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Pittsburgh, 1985. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 187-212).

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