Frank van Langevelde

Frank van Langevelde
Wageningen University & Research | WUR · Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Group

PhD

About

278
Publications
76,220
Reads
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Citations
Introduction
Frank van Langevelde is professor and chair of the Wildlife Ecology and Conservation group of Wageningen University, The Netherlands. His research focuses broadly on adaptations of animals to stress (e.g. diseases, poor food quality, predators, high temperatures, humans). Environmental stresses can constrain movement and searching for habitat and food, such as the presence of predators and exposure to extreme ambient temperatures or periods of drought.
Additional affiliations
January 2014 - September 2016
Wageningen University & Research
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
January 2002 - December 2013
Wageningen University & Research
Education
September 1987 - March 1992
Wageningen University & Research
Field of study
  • Land use planning

Publications

Publications (278)
Article
Anthropogenically elevated CO 2 (eCO 2 ) concentrations have been suggested to increase woody cover within tropical ecosystems through fertilization. The effect of eCO 2 is built into Earth system models, although testing the relationship over long periods remains challenging. Here, we explore the relative importance of six drivers of vegetation ch...
Poster
Full-text available
The transition between tropical forests and savannas is characterized by frequent disturbances due to fires, herbivores and drought. These disturbances are likely to increase with changes in land use and climate. Seedling performance and trait responses to these disturbances may differ between tree functional types, but such differences (which can...
Article
Full-text available
An increasing demand for pollination services highlights the need for research on alternative pollinators for greenhouse and open field food crops. We compared the foraging behaviour and effectiveness of seven endemic African Meliponinae (Meliponula bocandei, Dactylurina schmidti, Plebeina hildebrandti, Meliponula lendliana, Hypotrigona gribodoi, M...
Article
Full-text available
p>Artificial light at night (ALAN) is one of the suggested drivers of the global decline in insects, including moths. ALAN strongly affects moth physiology and behaviour, but it remains unknown whether ALAN is a selective pressure that drives adaptation and evolution in moths. We assess whether feeding and calling behaviours of Yponomeuta cagnagell...
Article
Full-text available
Inexpensive and accessible sensors are accelerating data acquisition in animal ecology. These technologies hold great potential for large-scale ecological understanding, but are limited by current processing approaches which inefficiently distill data into relevant information. We argue that animal ecologists can capitalize on large datasets genera...
Article
Full-text available
Carcass decomposition largely depends on vertebrate scavengers. However, how behavioral differences between vertebrate scavenger species, the dominance of certain species, and the diversity of the vertebrate scavenger community affect the speed of carcass decomposition is poorly understood. As scavenging is an overlooked trophic interaction, studyi...
Article
Full-text available
Mixed‐species groups are usually explained by foraging advantages and reduced predation risk for at least one of the participating species. Given that animals trade‐off foraging and vigilance, the optimal level of vigilance of individuals in mixed‐species groups depends partly on the vigilance levels of both conspecifics and heterospecifics. Howeve...
Article
br/> Intraguild interactions among mammalian carnivores are important in shaping carnivore guild composition. Competing species may inhabit different areas and/or being active during different times to reduce the risk of aggressive interactions, but the role of body size in intraguild interactions within carnivore guilds remains largely unknown. We...
Article
Full-text available
Predation risk is a major driver of the distribution of prey animals, which typically show strong responses to cues for predator presence. An unresolved question is whether naïve individuals respond to mimicked cues, and whether such cues can be used to deter prey. We investigated whether playback of wolf sounds induces fear responses in naïve ungu...
Article
Full-text available
1. We assessed the hypothesized negative correlation between the influence of multiple predators and body condition and fecundity of the European hare, from 13 areas in the Netherlands. 2. Year- round abundance of predators was estimated by hunters. We quantified predator influence as the sum of their field metabolic rates, as this sum reflects the...
Article
Full-text available
The current honey bee decline necessitates the use of alternative native pollinators to ensure global food security. Here, we compared the pollination behaviour and efficiency of the African honey bee (Apis mellifera) and six African endemic Meliponini (Meliponula bocandei, Dactylurina schmidti, Meliponula lendliana, Hypotrigona gribodoi, Meliponul...
Article
Full-text available
Climate warming in the Arctic has led to warmer and earlier springs, and as a result, many food resources for migratory animals become available earlier in the season, as well as become distributed further northwards. To optimally profit from these resources, migratory animals are expected to arrive earlier in the Arctic, as well as shift their own...
Article
Full-text available
Current farm systems rely on the use of Plant Protection Products (PPP) to secure high productivity and control threats to the quality of the crops. However, PPP use may have considerable impacts on human health and the environment. A study protocol is presented aiming to determine the occurrence and levels of PPP residues in plants (crops), animal...
Preprint
Full-text available
Data acquisition in animal ecology is rapidly accelerating due to inexpensive and accessible sensors such as smartphones, drones, satellites, audio recorders and bio-logging devices. These new technologies and the data they generate hold great potential for large-scale environmental monitoring and understanding, but are limited by current data proc...
Article
Full-text available
Honeybee colonies experience high losses, induced by several stressors that can result in the collapse of colonies. Experiments show what effects stressors, such as parasites, pathogens and pesticides, can have on individual honeybees as well as colonies. Although individuals may die, colonies do not always collapse from such disturbances. As a sup...
Article
Full-text available
We introduce the AusTraits database - a compilation of values of plant traits for taxa in the Australian flora (hereafter AusTraits). AusTraits synthesises data on 448 traits across 28,640 taxa from field campaigns, published literature, taxonomic monographs, and individual taxon descriptions. Traits vary in scope from physiological measures of per...
Article
Full-text available
For more than three decades, honeybee colonies (Apis mellifera) have experienced high losses during winter and these losses are still continuing. It is crucial that beekeepers monitor their colonies closely and anticipate losses early enough to apply mitigating actions. We tested whether colony size can be used as early predictor for potential colo...
Article
Full-text available
Migration of ungulates (hooved mammals) is a fundamental ecological process that promotes abundant herds, whose effects cascade up and down terrestrial food webs. Migratory ungulates provide the prey base that maintains large carnivore and scavenger populations and underpins terrestrial biodiversity (fig. S1). When ungulates move in large aggregati...
Article
Full-text available
Co-occurring tree functional types (TFTs) within forest-savanna transitions may differ in seedling responses to grass competition and fire in savannas. We performed a common garden experiment in the Guinea savanna of Ghana to test hypotheses related to competition effects on growth, allocation to root storage reserves, and subsequent survival respo...
Article
Full-text available
Background Tick-borne diseases (TBDs) are a serious threat to humans, wildlife and livestock, and cause severe economic losses in many tropical drylands. The effective control of TBDs has been constrained by limited understanding of what determines tick loads in animals. We tested interactive effects of several biological factors (sex, age and body...
Article
Full-text available
In their comment on Veenendaal et al, (2018) Laris and Jacobs question the appropriateness of fire experiments to simulate effects of fire on tropical vegetation cover as well as objecting to our use of the word “natural” to describe non‐anthropogenic fire regimes. They also challenge some of the conclusions we drew as regards the likelihood of fir...
Article
Full-text available
Wildlife crime is one of the most profitable illegal industries worldwide. Current actions to reduce it are far from effective and fail to prevent population declines of many endangered species, pressing the need for innovative anti-poaching solutions. Here, we propose and test a poacher early warning system that is based on the movement responses...
Article
Full-text available
p>Large carnivore populations are declining worldwide due to anthropogenic causes such as habitat loss and human expansion into wild areas. Competition between large carnivores can exacerbate this decline. While brown hyena Parahyaena brunnea and spotted hyena Crocuta crocuta belong to the same family, they are rarely found in the same area or co-o...
Preprint
Full-text available
We introduce the AusTraits database - a compilation of measurements of plant traits for taxa in the Australian flora (hereafter AusTraits). AusTraits synthesises data on 375 traits across 29230 taxa from field campaigns, published literature, taxonomic monographs, and individual taxa descriptions. Traits vary in scope from physiological measures of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Wildlife crime is one of the most profitable illegal industries worldwide. Current actions to reduce it are far from effective and fail to prevent population declines of many endangered species, pressing the need for innovative anti-poaching solutions. Here, we propose and test a real-time poacher early warning system that is based on the movement...
Article
Full-text available
High parasite load may increase honey bee mortality, which enhances stimuli for undertaker recruitment in colonies due to the presence of more corpses. However, it is unknown whether colonies exposed to the parasitic mite Varroa destructor (V+ colonies) remove corpses faster compared to colonies with reduced parasite levels (V− colonies). To test t...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Animals respond to environmental variation by changing their movement in a multifaceted way. Recent advancements in biologging increasingly allow for detailed measurements of the multifaceted nature of movement, from descriptors of animal movement trajectories (e.g., using GPS) to descriptors of body part movements (e.g., using tri-axia...
Article
Full-text available
en Plant available moisture and plant available nutrients in soils influence forage quality and availability and subsequently affect reproductive performance in herbivores. However, the relationship of soil moisture, soil nutrients and woody forage with reproductive performance indicators is not well understood in mega‐browsers yet these three are...
Article
Weather conditions can impact infectious disease transmission, causing mortalities in humans, wild and domestic animals. Although rainfall in dry tropical regions is highly variable over the year, rainfall is thought to play an important role in the transmission of tick-borne diseases. Whether variation in rainfall affects disease-induced mortaliti...
Article
Full-text available
The parasitic mite Varroa destructor is an important contributor to the high losses of western honeybees. Forager bees from Varroa -infested colonies show reduced homing and flight capacity; it is not known whether flight manoeuvrability and related learning capability are also affected. Here, we test how honeybees from Varroa -infested and control...
Article
Full-text available
We analysed thirty-five 400-m ² plots encompassing forest, savanna and intermediate vegetation types in an ecotonal area in Ghana, West Africa. Across all plots, fire frequency was over a period of 15 years relatively uniform (once in 2–4 years). Although woodlands were dominated by species typically associated with savanna-type formations, and wit...
Preprint
Full-text available
For more than three decades, honeybee colonies ( Apis mellifera ) experience high losses during winter, and these losses are still continuing. It is crucial that beekeepers monitor their colonies closely and anticipate losses early enough to apply mitigating actions. We tested whether colony size can be used as early predictor for potential colony...
Article
Full-text available
Wild vertebrate populations all over the globe are in decline, with poaching being the second-most-important cause. The high poaching rate of rhinoceros may drive these species into extinction within the coming decades. Some stakeholders argue to lift the ban on international rhino horn trade to potentially benefit rhino conservation, as current in...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Animals respond to environmental variation by changing their movement in a multifaceted way. Recent advancements in biologging increasingly allow for detailed measurements of the multifaceted nature of movement, from descriptors of animal movement trajectories (e.g., using GPS) to descriptors of body part movements (e.g., using tri-axia...
Article
Full-text available
Red–blue emitting LEDs have recently been introduced in greenhouses to optimise plant growth. However, this spectrum may negatively affect the performance of bumblebees used for pollination, because the visual system of bumblebees is more sensitive to green light than to red–blue light. We used high-speed stereoscopic videography to three-dimension...
Article
• Nearly 90% of the world's large herbivore diversity occurs in Africa, yet there is a striking dearth of information on the movement ecology of these organisms compared to herbivores living in higher latitude ecosystems. • The environmental context for movements of large herbivores in African savanna ecosystems has several distinguishing features....
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Animals respond to environmental variation by changing their movement in a multifaceted way. Recent advancements in biologging increasingly allow for detailed measurements of the multifaceted nature of movement, from descriptors of animal movement trajectories (e.g., using GPS) to descriptors of body part movements (e.g., using tri-axia...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Animals respond to environmental variation by changing their movement in a multifaceted way. Recent advancements in biologging increasingly allow for detailed measurements of the multifaceted nature of movement, from descriptors of animal movement trajectories (e.g., using GPS) to descriptors of body part movements (e.g., using tri-axia...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Animals respond to environmental variation by changing their movement in a multifaceted way. Recent advancements in biologging increasingly allow for detailed measurements of the multifaceted nature of movement, from descriptors of animal movement trajectories (e.g., using GPS) to descriptors of body part movements (e.g., using tri-axia...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Animals respond to environmental variation by changing their movement in a multifaceted way. Recent advancements in biologging increasingly allow for detailed measurements of the multifaceted nature of movement, from descriptors of animal movement trajectories (e.g., using GPS) to descriptors of body part movements (e.g., using tri-axia...
Article
Full-text available
Plant biomass allocation may be optimized to acquire and conserve resources. How trade‐offs in allocation of tropical tree seedlings depend on different stressors is still poorly understood. Here we test whether above and below‐ground traits of tropical tree seedlings could explain observed occurrence along gradients of resources (light, water) and...
Chapter
In this Chapter we review studies that model the dynamics of tropical savannas and the effects of grazing and browsing on the vegetation. Many empirical studies illustrate the large impact that grazers and browsers can have on savanna vegetation, both directly and indirectly. We summarize this understanding in a simple model to capture the dynamics...
Article
Full-text available
Theory on the density-body mass (DBM) relationship predicts that the density of animal species decreases by the power of −0.75 per unit increase in their body mass, or by the power of −1 when taxa across trophic levels are studied. This relationship is, however, largely debated as the slope often deviates from the theoretical predictions. Here, we...
Article
Full-text available
1. Animal population sizes are often estimated using aerial sample counts by human observers, both for wildlife and livestock. The associated methods of counting remained more or less the same since the 1970s, but suffer from low precision and low accuracy of population estimates. 2. Aerial counts using cost‐efficient Unmanned Aerial Vehicles or mi...
Article
Studies on the highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 suggest that wild bird migration may facilitate its long‐distance spread, yet the role of wild bird community composition in its transmission risk remains poorly understood. Furthermore, most studies on the diversity–disease relationship focused on host species diversity without consideri...
Preprint
Full-text available
Thermoregulation in honey bee colonies during winter is thought to be self-organised. We added mortality of individual honey bees to an existing model of thermoregulation to account for elevated losses of bees that are reported worldwide. The aim of analysis is to obtain a better fundamental understanding of the consequences of individual mortality...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial variation in habitat riskiness has a major influence on the predator–prey space race. However, the outcome of this race can be modulated if prey shares enemies with fellow prey (i.e., another prey species). Sharing of natural enemies may result in apparent competition, and its implications for prey space use remain poorly studied. Our objec...
Article
Differential tree seedling recruitment across forest-savanna ecotones is poorly understood, but hypothesized to be influenced by vegetation cover and associated factors. In a 3-y-long field transplant experiment in the forest-savanna ecotone of Ghana, we assessed performance and root allocation of 864 seedlings for two forest ( Khaya ivorensis and...
Article
Full-text available
Pimpernelblauwtjes, knoopmieren en springstaarten zijn onlosmakelijk met elkaar verbonden. De rupsen van de blauwtjes leven in de nesten van knoopmieren en springstaarten vormen een belangrijke voedselbron van knoopmieren. Om meer inzicht te krijgen in deze relaties is de verspreiding van springstaarten in een recentelijk afgegraven natuurontwikkel...
Article
Background: Forest and savanna vegetation in the zone of transition (ZOT) contain distinct woody species due to fire, drought and herbivory barriers that constrain forest species from invading adjacent savannas and vice-versa. Little is known if these barriers cause divergence in species composition between the overstorey and understorey strata in...
Article
1.Changes in savanna tree species composition, both within landscapes and across climatic gradients, suggest that species differ in their ability to utilise resources and cope with grass competition. Linking trait variation among species to their relative performance under resource limitation and competition treatments could provide mechanistic und...
Article
Full-text available
Water is a scarce resource in semi-arid savannas where over half of the African elephants (Loxodonta africana) populations occur and may therefore influence their movement pattern. A random search is expected for an animal with no information on the location of the target resource, else, a direction-oriented walk is expected. We hypothesized that e...
Article
Full-text available
Variation in the home-range size of nesting animals is thought to be driven by nutritional requirements, food availability, and predation risk of the animals during foraging. Only few studies have considered that the risk of nest predation may also affect home-range size because nests become more difficult to defend as animals move further away. We...
Article
Ticks and tick-borne diseases (TTBDs) constitute a lethal and widespread problem in many tropical areas, with major ramifications for livestock production, wildlife management, and human health and livelihoods. Despite various control strategies applied, TTBDs remain a complex problem, and integrated approaches must be developed to control them eff...
Article
Full-text available
During times of high activity by predators and competitors, herbivores may be forced to forage in patches of low‐quality food. However, the relative importance in determining where and what herbivores forage still remains unclear, especially for small‐ and intermediate‐sized herbivores. Our objective was to test the relative importance of predator...
Article
Light sources attract nocturnal flying insects, but some lamps attract more insects than others. The relation between the properties of a light source and the number of attracted insects is, however, poorly understood. We developed a model to quantify the attractiveness of light sources based on the spectral output. This model is fitted using data...
Poster
Full-text available
Sustainable conservation of the single Dutch population of Maculinea (Phengaris) teleius is impossible without enlarging its fen meadow habitat over former agricultural land. Within the LIFE+ restoration project Blues in the Marshes, in the South of The Netherlands, almost 250 ha have been excavated, clippings from fen meadow vegetation have been a...
Poster
Full-text available
In 2001, the myrmecophilous butterfly Maculinea nausithous, spontaneously recolonized some road verges in the agricultural landscape in the south of The Netherlands. Several massive restoration actions were taken to enlarge the habitat of this population: a new meandering stream was created, the old drainage channels were filled, the enriched topso...
Article
Full-text available
The decline of open habitats in Europe, such as semi-natural grasslands and heathlands, has caused a general decline in biodiversity, which has been well documented for butterflies. Current conservation practices often involve grazing by domestic livestock to maintain suitable butterfly habitats. The extent to which wild ungulates may play a simila...