Frank Gerits

Frank Gerits
University of Amsterdam | UVA · Department of History, Archaeology and Area Studies

Doctor of History

About

20
Publications
3,259
Reads
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35
Citations
Introduction
As a Belgian researcher who is now working in South Africa I believe in the importance, but also understand the challenges, of international and global research. I am currently working on my book project: "The Ideological Scramble in Africa: How the Dream of African Development shaped a Continental Cold War (1945-1966)". My postdoctoral project: Competing Continental Agendas: European Integration and African Union through African Eyes (1945-1966)
Additional affiliations
October 2016 - present
University of Amsterdam
Position
  • Lecturer
January 2016 - December 2018
University of the Free State
Position
  • Research Associate
January 2015 - July 2015
University of the Free State
Position
  • Agnese N. Haury postdoctoral scholar, Center for the United States and the Cold War, Tamiment Library, New York University, NYU

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Dwight Eisenhower did not ignore the call for African independence because of the Soviet threat. Instead cultural assistance—education and information—were employed to foster self-government. This commitment to cultural assistance explains why aid to African countries in real numbers remained low: economic assistance had to include educational sche...
Article
How important international actors such as France, Britain and the United States, viewed the Bandung Conference of 1955 is heavily debated. Furthermore, it remains unclear how the Gold Coast, an emerging power in Africa, perceived the Afro-Asian meeting. This article seeks to illuminate those positions on Bandung through a multi-centric analysis an...
Research
Full-text available
op ed on Brusselsattack. Radical empathy as the only solution to radical islam
Article
Between 1945 and 1966, Belgian public diplomacy operatives turned Africa into their principal target area. Scholars have alternately seen Belgian foreign policy as driven by the quest to safeguard economic interests while also emphasizing the skill with which Belgian foreign ministers increased the influence of Belgium within the Transatlantic part...
Article
Full-text available
What is there new to say on the Low Countries and transatlantic relations during the Cold War? How do recent trends in Cold War research open up uncharted areas to explore these relations from new angles and perspectives? With attention shifting to cultural, global, transnational and multi-centric approaches to the international history of the twen...
Article
Full-text available
This introductory article critically assesses the main themes and issues that have dominated the historiography of the Low Countries and Eastern Europe during the Cold War. It reflects on the ways in which new archival sources and trends in international historical research can make the picture of East-West relations more diversified and complex in...
Article
Full-text available
From independence onwards, Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana pursued a position of positive neutrality and non-alignment. Historians claim that the Congo crisis and the Sharpeville massacre of 1960 led Nkrumah to question the viability of strict non-alignment. Newly declassified Ghanaian sources and an analysis of the components that make up the pan-African i...
Article
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
On 15 January 1958, Ambram E. Manell, the Public Affairs Officer (PAO) at the United States Information Service in Brussels (USIS Brussels), received a telephone call from the cultural attaché of the Soviet Embassy, Mr. Charov. Through the crackling phone line Charov invited his American colleague for lunch in La Directoire, a restaurant in Brussel...
Article
Full-text available
In the 1950s, the Cold War became a battle for hearts and minds in which public diplomacy became the most important weapon. Public diplomacy can be broadly defined as an international actors' attempt to conduct its foreign policy by engaging with foreign publics. The United States Information Service Brussels (USIS) focused on spreading propaganda...

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