Francoise Lermite

Francoise Lermite
The University of Newcastle, Australia · School of Psychology

PhD (Behavioural ecology)

About

8
Publications
1,010
Reads
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165
Citations
Citations since 2016
6 Research Items
141 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022051015202530
Introduction
Francoise Lermite currently works at the School of Psychology, University of Newcastle. Francoise does research in Ethology, Invasive species, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Most recent publications are 'Tasting novel foods and selecting nutrient content in a highly successful ecological invader, the common myna' and 'Personality and problem-solving in common mynas (Acridotheres tristis)'.

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Theory suggests that overcrowding and increased competition in urban environments might be detrimental to individual condition in avian populations. Unfavourable conditions could be compounded by changes in dietary niche with additional consequences for individual quality of urban birds. We analysed the isotopic signatures, signal coloration, body...
Article
Full-text available
The extent to which native species utilize urban environments depends on species responses to multiple threatening processes. Here, we aimed to quantify changes in bird communities in response to changing habitat structure, invasive species and aggressive native species. We conducted surveys in two independently invaded regions with similar pattern...
Article
Full-text available
Australian cavity-nesting birds in urban habitats can encounter strong competition for nesting cavities. This results from the shortage of old large hollow-bearing trees in urban areas and because cities often host a suite of alien birds, including cavity-nesters. However, it is unclear whether some behavioural differences are involved with access...
Article
Full-text available
Invasion success is dependent on the ability of a species to discover and exploit novel food resources. Within this context, individuals must be willing to taste novel foods. They must also be capable of evaluating the nutritional content of new foods, and selecting their relative intake in order to fulfil their nutritional needs. Whereas the forme...
Chapter
How does behaviour affect biological invasions? Can it explain why some animals are such successful invaders? With contributions from experts in the field, and covering a broad range of animals, this book examines the role of behaviour in biological invasions from the point of view of both invaders and native species. The chapters cover theoretical...
Article
Full-text available
Behavioural innovations are increasingly thought to provide a rich source of phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary change. Innovation propensity shows substantial variation across avian taxa and provides an adaptive mechanism by which behaviour is flexibly adjusted to changing environmental conditions. Here, we tested for the first time the predic...
Article
Foraging innovations are increasingly recognized as an important source of phenotypic plasticity, evolutionary change and adaptation to environmental challenges. One line of research has successfully demonstrated that innovation can represent a stable individual trait, but by the same token has shown strong contextual effects on innovation. We exam...

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