Francois Teste

Francois Teste
IMASL-CONICET & Universidad Nacional de San Luis and The University of Western Australia

Doctor of Philosophy

About

65
Publications
33,678
Reads
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2,507
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2010 - February 2015
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Research Assistant
May 2008 - September 2010
University of Alberta
Position
  • Fellow

Publications

Publications (65)
Article
Full-text available
Many applied disciplines have recognized problems related to the practice of data analysis within their own communities. Some of them have even declared the existence of a statistical crisis that has raised doubts about findings that were once considered well established. In biological sciences, the recognition of misuse or poor reporting of statis...
Article
Full-text available
The Janzen‐Connell (JC) hypothesis predicts that conspecific negative density dependence contributes to the maintenance of plant diversity by lowering the recruitment of locally abundant plant species. The JC hypothesis is a widely evoked explanation for the high species diversity in tropical forests, but remains poorly tested in other species‐rich...
Article
1. Negative conspecific interactions have been shown to promote diversity in plant communities, as have some heterospecific interactions such as intransitive competition and facilitation. However, it is unclear whether combinations of conspecific and other heterospecific interactions can also promote diversity in plant communities. We therefore inv...
Article
Development of soil microbial communities is driven by local abiotic and biotic conditions, yet our current understanding of their ecology is limited to studies in modified or young and relatively fertile ecosystems. In nutrient-impoverished soils, microbial communities may be predominantly structured by availability of key elements such as phospho...
Preprint
Pines (Pinus spp.) rely on co-introduced ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi to invade native ecosystems in the Southern Hemisphere. Although co-invasive EM fungal communities are expected to be poor in species, long-term successional trajectories and the persistence of dispersal limitations are not well understood. We sampled the roots and surrounding soil...
Article
Full-text available
Pine tree invasions threaten many natural ecosystems of the Southern Hemisphere, modifying their structure and functioning through shifts in fire regimes, water balance, and biodiversity. The magnitude of such impacts depends on how much of the landscape has been invaded, thus a better understanding of the dispersal ability of pines and predictions...
Article
Full-text available
Plants that produce specialised cluster roots, which mobilise large quantities of poorly available nutrients such as phosphorus (P), can provide a benefit to neighbouring plants that produce roots in the cluster rhizosphere, as demonstrated previously in pot studies. To be effective, such roots must be present within the short time of peak cluster...
Article
In arid highland environments harsh conditions for vegetation establishment prevail. Plants in these environments develop different strategies to survive, including associations with fungal root endophytes. These associations may improve plant growth, helping plant resistance to adverse environments. The aim of this study was to determine the relat...
Article
Dual-mycorrhizal plants are capable of associating with fungi that form characteristic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (EM) structures. Here we address the following questions: i) how many dual-mycorrhizal plant species are there?; ii) what are the advantages for a plant to host two, rather than one, mycorrhizal types?; iii) which f...
Article
1.The vast majority of terrestrial plants form root symbioses with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi to enhance nutrient (particularly phosphorus, P) acquisition. However, some plant species also form dual symbioses involving ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, with a subset of those also forming triple symbioses also involving dinitrogen (N2)‐fixing bact...
Article
Full-text available
Long-term soil age gradients are useful model systems to study how changes in nutrient limitation shape communities of plant root mutualists because they represent strong natural gradients of nutrient availability, particularly of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Here, we investigated changes in the dinitrogen (N2)-fixing bacterial community compos...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims In Australia’s Mediterranean hyperdiverse vegetation, species that produce cluster roots to mobilise poorly-available nutrients (e.g. Banksia spp.) are an important functional and structural component. Cluster roots are only active during the wet season, indicating a strong dependence on suitable surface soil moisture conditions...
Article
Full-text available
Background Mycorrhizal strategies are very effective in enhancing plant acquisition of poorly-mobile nutrients, particularly phosphorus (P) from infertile soil. However, on very old and severely P-impoverished soils, a carboxylate-releasing and P-mobilising cluster-root strategy is more effective at acquiring this growth-limiting resource. Carboxyl...
Article
Changes in soil fertility during pedogenesis affect the quantity and quality of resources entering the belowground subsystem. Climate governs pedogenesis, yet how climate modulates responses of soil food webs to soil ageing remains unexplored because of the paucity of appropriate model systems. We characterised soil food webs along each of four ret...
Article
Soil biota influence plant performance through plant-soil feedback, but it is unclear whether the strength of such feedback depends on plant traits and whether plant-soil feedback drives local plant diversity. We grew 16 co-occurring plant species with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies from hyperdiverse Australian shrublands and exposed t...
Chapter
Ecological succession has been widely studied for more than a century, but the focus has mainly been on plant community dynamics over time. In the last 2 decades there has been a steady increase of research focused on mycorrhizal fungal succession, in part because of methodological advancements. In this chapter we first review mechanisms of mycorrh...
Article
Full-text available
Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal communities co-vary with host plant communities along soil fertility gradients, yet it is unclear whether this reflects changes in host composition, fungal edaphic specialisation, or priority effects during fungal community establishment. We grew two co-occurring ECM plant species (to control for host identity) in soils...
Data
Table S1. Comparison of mycorrhizal root colonization between fresh and rehydrated roots. Values shown as mean ± SE based on paired t‐test
Data
Table S3. Data file used in this study with plant biomass, N and P concentration, AM and ECM root colonization, and nodule biomass.
Data
Table S2. Summary of statistical outputs. Values shown are degrees of freedom (DF), F‐test and p‐value of individual mixed‐effect models of two factors (Stage and Species), and their interaction for each variable.
Article
Full-text available
Changes in soil nutrient availability during long-term ecosystem development influence the relative abundances of plant species with different nutrient-acquisition strategies. These changes in strategies are observed at the community level, but whether they also occur within individual species remains unknown. Plant species forming multiple root sy...
Article
Ecological restoration of species-rich grasslands remains a priority for conservation of biodiversity. Torrez et al. (Applied Vegetation Science, this issue) determined if plant species recolonization of degraded nutrient-poor grasslands could be increased by adding a local source of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) inoculum at different distanc...
Article
Full-text available
Nitrogen (N) transfer between plants has been found where at least one plant can fix N2. In nutrient-poor soils, where plants with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies (without N2 fixation) co-occur, it is unclear if N transfer exists and what promotes it. A novel multi-species microcosm pot experiment was conducted to quantify N transfer be...
Article
Ecosystem retrogression following long-term pedogenesis is attributed to phosphorus (P) limitation of primary productivity. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) enhance P acquisition for most terrestrial plants, but it has been suggested that this strategy becomes less effective in strongly-weathered soils with extremely-low P availability. Using nex...
Chapter
Summary 1. Carbon (C), nutrients and water (H2O) have been known for five decades to flow between plants through ectomycorrhizal (EM) networks. This flux has the potential to affect plant and fungal performance and resource distribution within communities. 2. We asked two questions: 1) What are the pathways and mechanisms for C, nutrient and H2O fl...
Article
Feedbacks between plants and soil communities may be elusive, yet they have far-reaching consequences for plant physiology, competition and community structure. Plant–soil feedbacks (PSFs) are plant-mediated changes to soil properties that ultimately influence the performance of the same or other plants (Van der Putten et al., 2013). These PSFs may...
Chapter
Full-text available
Conducting research on what drives the structure of plant communities is of great interest in order to restore and conserve biodiversity. There are numerous interacting forces that appear to shape plant communities yet there remains important gaps in our understanding of the role of the belowground, the ‘hidden-half’ (Eshel & Beeckman 2013), in thi...
Chapter
Full-text available
Plant life in the kwongan has evolved on some of the world’s most nutrient-impoverished sandy soils. The availability of phosphorus (P) is particularly low on these sandy soils, but soil nitrogen (N), potassium (K) and micronutrients are also notoriously scarce (McArthur, 1991). The extreme infertility of most kwongan soils is primarily due to the...
Data
Figure 3 in Chapter 4 of "Plant Life on the Sandplains in Southwest Australia, a Global Biodiversity Hotspot". Lambers, H. (ed.). University of Western Australia Publishing, Crawley, in press. Available in August 2014. Variation in cluster-root morphology of different woody species of Proteaceae. (a) ‘Simple’ proteoid roots, typical of, e.g., Hakea...
Article
Nitrogen (N) transfer between plants has been found where at least one plant can fix N2. In nutrient-poor soils, where plants with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies (without N2 fixation) co-occur, it is unclear if N transfer exists and what promotes it. A novel multi-species microcosm pot experiment was conducted to quantify N transfer be...
Article
Full-text available
Proteaceae species in south-western Australia occur on phosphorus- (P) impoverished soils. Their leaves contain very low P levels, but have relatively high rates of photosynthesis. We measured ribosomal RNA (rRNA) abundance, soluble protein, activities of several enzymes, and glucose 6-phosphate (Glc6P) levels in expanding and mature leaves of six...
Article
Full-text available
Greater understanding of positive interspecific interactions in nutrient-poor soils is a priority, particularly in phosphorus- (P) limited ecosystems where plants with contrasting nutrient-acquiring strategies co-occur. It is also relevant to agro-ecosystems, since global P stocks are being depleted. In this study, we assess positive interactions b...
Data
Rates of expansion of Arabidopsis thaliana rosette leaves; plants were grown in short days (8 h/16 h light/dark). Table S1. Recovery of enzyme activities. Powdered samples were prepared from a standard greenhouse-grown Arabidopsis (‘Arabidopsis’) and from a mix in equal parts of Banksia attenuata, B. menziesii and B. candolleana (‘Banksia-mix’). Th...
Article
This article comments on: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi reduce growth and infect roots of the non‐host plant Arabidopsis thaliana
Article
Full-text available
Some of the most species-rich plant communities occur on ancient, strongly weathered soils, whereas those on recently developed soils tend to be less diverse. Mechanisms underlying this well-known pattern, however, remain unresolved. Here, we present a conceptual model describing alternative mechanisms by which pedogenesis (the process of soil form...
Article
Full-text available
South-western Australia harbours a global biodiversity hotspot on the world's most phosphorus (P)-impoverished soils. The greatest biodiversity occurs on the most severely nutrient-impoverished soils, where non-mycorrhizal species are a prominent component of the flora. Mycorrhizal species dominate where soils contain slightly more phosphorus. In a...
Article
Background and Aims Carbon and nutrient cycling are influenced by ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi in forests. Factors altering carbon allocation in trees are likely to alter EM fungal community composition. We aimed to determine the effects of high fertilization, thinning, and their interaction on EM fungal communities and fine roots. Methods Roots and...
Article
Proteaceae species in south-western Australia occur on severely phosphorus (P)-impoverished soils. They have very low leaf P concentrations, but relatively fast rates of photosynthesis, thus exhibiting extremely high photosynthetic phosphorus-use-efficiency (PPUE). Although the mechanisms underpinning their high PPUE remain unknown, one possibility...
Article
Full-text available
Mycorrhizal networks, defined as a common mycorrhizal mycelium linking the roots of at least two plants, occur in all major terrestrial ecosystems. This review discusses the recent progress and challenges in our understanding of the characteristics, functions, ecology and models of mycorrhizal networks, with the goal of encouraging future research...
Article
Several heavy wet snowfalls occurred during 2007–2009 across a broad-scale thinning and fertilization experiment to bring overstocked juvenile lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) in the foothills of Alberta, Canada into an intensive management regime. We examined the bending and breakage of trees in relation to thinning and fertilization...
Article
Full-text available
Seed banks are important for the natural regeneration of many forest species. Most of the seed bank of serotinous lodgepole pine is found in the canopy, but after an outbreak of mountain pine beetle (MPB), a considerable forest-floor seed bank develops through the falling of canopy cones. After large-scale mortality of pine stands from MPB, however...
Article
There are concerns that large-scale stand mortality due to mountain pine beetle (MPB) could greatly reduce natural regeneration of serotinous Rocky Mountain (RM) lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) because the closed cones are held in place without the fire cue for cone opening. We selected 20 stands (five stands each of live [control],...
Article
1. Mycorrhizal pathways are comprised of fungal hyphae that facilitate carbon transfer between plants. We determined whether net carbon transfer occurred between conspecific conifer seedlings in the field, and whether soil disturbance or access to mycorrhizal pathways affected transfer. 2. We established two soil disturbances and planted pairs of d...
Article
Mycorrhizal networks (MNs) are fungal hyphae that connect roots of at least two plants. It has been suggested that these networks are ecologically relevant because they may facilitate interplant resource transfer and improve regeneration dynamics. This study investigated the effects of MNs on seedling survival, growth and physiological responses, i...
Article
The importance of mycorrhizal network (MN)-mediated colonization under field conditions between trees and seedlings was investigated. We also determined the combined influences of inoculum source and distance from trees on the ectomycorrhizal (EM) community of seedlings. On six sites, we established trenched plots around 24 residual Pseudotsuga men...
Article
Full-text available
The distribution of dry Douglas-fir forests in western North America is expected to shift northward with climate change and disappear from the grassland interface in the southern interior of British Columbia. This shift may be accentuated by clearcutting, a common harvesting practice that aims to reduce the competitive effects of residual mature tr...
Article
Mycorrhizal networks (MNs) are fungal hyphae that connect the roots of at least two plants, potentially providing a conduit for interplant resource transfer. Interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco) is an obligate ectomycorrhizal (EM) tree species that has high potential to form MNs with neighboring trees because of...
Article
Full-text available
Hydraulic redistribution (HR) is a process by which water moves through plant roots from moist to dry soils. An experiment was conducted to quantify the influence of common mycorrhizal networks (CMNs) and proximity to mature HR-source trees on the water relations of surrounding seedlings. Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var glauca (Mirb.) Franco...
Article
We conducted greenhouse experiments using Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) seedlings where chemical methods (fungicides) were used to prevent ectomycorrhizal colonization of single seedlings or physical methods (mesh barriers) were used to prevent formation of mycorrhizal connections between neighboring seedlings. These methods were...
Article
Full-text available
We studied the effects of commercially,available (Laccaria laccata (Scop.:Fr.) Berk. & Br. and Rhizopogon parksii Smith (Oregon source)) and native (R. parksii (British Columbia source)) ectomycorrhizal,(EM) inoculants on the survival and growth,of commercially,grown,interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga,menziesii var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco) seedling...
Article
The widespread use of heavy machinery during harvesting and site preparation in timber plantations in British Columbia (BC) has led to concerns that compaction causes a reduction in long-term soil productivity. Impacts of properties such as total C, water content, and texture on compactability of forest soils in BC were assessed. Two compactability...
Article
Serotinous lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia) usually regenerates after fire or harvesting provided conditions that are warm enough to open the cones. There are concerns that large-scale stand mortality due to mountain pine beetle (MPB) outbreak could greatly reduce natural regeneration of lodgepole pine because the closed cones are hel...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Invasion ecology and maintenance of biodiversity.