Francois Burgay

Francois Burgay
Università Ca' Foscari Venezia | UNIVE · Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics

Master of Science

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11
Publications
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59
Citations

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Polar regions are fragile ecosystems threatened by both long-range pollution and local human contamination. In this context, the environmental distribution of the Personal Care Products (PCPs) represent a major knowledge gap. Following preliminary Antarctic studies, Fragrance Materials (FMs) were analyzed in the seawater and snow collected in the a...
Article
Volcanic eruptions are widely used in ice core science to date or synchronize ice cores. Volcanoes emit large amounts of SO2 that is subsequently converted in the atmosphere into sulfuric acid/ sulphate. Its discrete and continuous quantification is currently used to determine the ice layers impacted by volcanic emissions, but available high-resolu...
Article
The chemical fractionation of ten metals (Al, Ti, Cr, Fe, Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, Zn and Ni) is reported for a marine sediment collected in the Joides Basin, Ross Sea, Antarctica. To evaluate their mobility and availability, the BCR sequential extraction procedure was applied on 11 sections of the sediment. The analyses, performed both by ICP-OES and GF-AA...
Article
Full-text available
Iron (Fe) is a key element in the Earth climate system, as it can enhance marine primary productivity in the high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions where, despite a high concentration of major nutrients, chlorophyll production is low due to iron limitation. Eolian mineral dust represents one of the main Fe sources to the oceans; thus, quantif...
Article
Full-text available
Polar stratospheric ozone has decreased since the 1970s due to anthropogenic emissions of chlorofluorocarbons and halons, resulting in the formation of an ozone hole over Antarctica. The effects of the ozone hole and the associated increase in incoming UV radiation on terrestrial and marine ecosystems are well established; however, the impact on ge...
Article
Full-text available
Ice core dating is the first step for a correct interpretation of climatic and environmental changes. In this work, we release the dating of the uppermost 197 m of the 250 m deep GV7(B) ice core (drill site, 70∘41′ S, 158∘52′ E; 1950 m a.s.l. in Oates Land, East Antarctica) with a sub-annual resolution. Chemical records of NO3-, MSA (methanesulfoni...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ice core dating is the first step for a correct interpretation of climatic and environmental changes. In this work, we release a stratigraphic dating of the uppermost 197 m of the 250 m deep GV7(B) ice core (drilling site, 70°41’S, 158°52’E, 1950 m a.s.l.) with a sub-annual resolution. Chemical stratigraphies of NO3−, MSA (methanesulfonic acid), no...
Article
Fe(II) is more soluble and bioavailable than Fe(III) species, therefore the investigation of their relativeabundance and redox processes is relevant to better assess the supply of bioavailable iron to the oceanand its impact on marine productivity. In this context, we present a discrete chemiluminescence-basedmethod for the determination of Fe(II)...
Article
Organic acids in aerosols Earth's atmosphere are ubiquitous and they have been extensively studied across urban, rural and polar environments. However, little is known about their properties, transport, source and seasonal variations in the Svalbard Archipelago. Here, we present the annual trend of organic acids in the aerosol collected at Ny-Ålesu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Iron is a key element in the Earth climate system as it can enhance the marine primary productivity in the High-Nutrient Low-Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions where, despite a high concentration of major nutrients, the chlorophyll production is low due to iron limitation. One of the main Fe sources to the ocean is Aeolian dust. For this reason, ice cores...

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