Franck Guy

Franck Guy
French National Centre for Scientific Research | CNRS · PALEVOPRIM - Laboratoire Paleontology Evolution Paleoecosystems Paleoprimatology

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About

130
Publications
34,802
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3,127
Citations
Citations since 2017
48 Research Items
914 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
2017201820192020202120222023050100150
Additional affiliations
January 2006 - present
French National Centre for Scientific Research
Position
  • Managing Director
January 2005 - present
January 2003 - present
Harvard University

Publications

Publications (130)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A little more than 25 million years ago, tailless monkeys (apes) appeared in Africa. They were the first members of a primate clade leading to humankind, the Hominoidea. Unfortunatly, the evolutionary history of the earliest apes remains largely unknown because of the scarcity of fossil remains and their fragmentary nature (mainly isolated teeth)....
Article
Full-text available
The occurrence of the genus Prolagus Pomel, 1853, in North Africa provides some of the strongest evidence for the existence of faunal exchanges between Europe and Africa. The oldest African Prolagus remains have been reported from the Messinian locality of Afoud in the Aït Kandoula Basin (6.2 Ma), identified during previous studies as the species P...
Article
Full-text available
Discoveries in recent decades indicate that the large papionin monkeys Paradolipo-pithecus and Procynocephalus are key members of the Late Pliocene-Early Pleisto-cene mammalian faunas of Eurasia. However, their taxonomical status, phylogenetic relationships, and ecological profile remain unclear. Here we investigate the two latter aspects through t...
Article
Full-text available
Bipedal locomotion is one of the key adaptations that define the hominin clade. Evidence of bipedalism is known from postcranial remains of late Miocene hominins as early as 6 million years ago (Ma) in eastern Africa1–4. Bipedality of Sahelanthropus tchadensis was hitherto inferred about 7 Ma in central Africa (Chad) based on cranial evidence5–7. H...
Article
Mammalian molars play a central role during chewing, or food comminution, through cyclic dental occlusion. Mammals fragment food items with varying degrees of efficiency depending on their dental morphology, suggesting an adaptive link that is yet to be assessed. Here, we test the effect of molar morphology at maximum intercuspation (centric occlus...
Article
Currently, very little is known about the ecology of extinct Eurasian cercopithecids. Dietary information is crucial in understanding the ecological adaptations and diversity of extinct cercopithecids and the evolution of this family. For example, the colobine genus Dolichopithecus is represented by multiple large-bodied species that inhabited Eura...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Several scenarios for the dispersal of Miocene hominids from Africa to Eurasia still coexist. The reason why it remains impossible to decide between these scenarios, and why some fundamental questions about the biogeographic history of Miocene hominids are so difficult to address, lies in a fragmented fossil record and uncertain dating. In order to...
Article
Full-text available
Size and shape variation of molar crowns in primates plays an important role in understanding how species adapted to their environment. Gorillas are commonly considered to be folivorous primates because they possess sharp cusped molars which are adapted to process fibrous leafy foods. However, the proportion of fruit in their diet can vary signific...
Article
In order to understand mammalian evolution and compute a wide range of biodiversity indices, we commonly use the ‘bioregion’, a spatial division adapted to ecological and evolutionary constraints. While commonly conducted by neontologists, the establishment of bioregions in palaeontology is generally a secondary analysis, shaped on subjective time...
Article
During the mid-to-late Pliocene (ca. 4–3 Ma), several hominin species were present in central Sahel, eastern and southern Africa. The potential for the discovery of hominin remains from this interval is limited by the availability of exposed Pliocene deposits and the ability to investigate them. As a result, most discoveries have been made in the A...
Preprint
Full-text available
Size and shape variation of molar crowns in primates plays an important role in understanding how species adapted to their environment. Gorillas are commonly considered to be folivorous primates because they possess sharp cusped molars which are adapted to process fibrous leafy foods. However, the proportion of fruit in their diet can vary signific...
Article
Extant colobine monkeys are specialized leaf eaters. But during the late Miocene, western Eurasia was home to colobines which were less efficient at chewing leaves than they were at breaking seed shells. To understand the link between folivory and granivory in this lineage, the dietary niche of Mesopithecus delsoni and M. pentelicus was investigate...
Preprint
Full-text available
Terrestrial bipedal locomotion is one of the key adaptations defining the hominin clade. Evidences of undisputed bipedalism are known from postcranial remains of late Miocene hominins as soon as 6 Ma in eastern Africa. Bipedality of Sahelanthropus tchadensis was hitherto documented at 7 Ma in central Africa (Chad) by cranial evidence. Here, we pres...
Article
Full-text available
Diet plays an incontrovertible role in primate evolution, affecting anatomy, growth and development, behavior, and social structure. It should come as no surprise that a myriad of methods for reconstructing diet have developed, mostly utilizing the element that is not only most common in the fossil record but also most pertinent to diet: teeth. Twe...
Data
This document presents the code, data and analysis used in the paper ‘From leaves to seeds: The dietary shift in late Miocene colobine monkeys of southeastern Europe’ co-authored by Ghislain THIERY, Corentin GIBERT, Franck GUY, Vincent LAZZARI, Nikolaï SPASSOV, Denis GERAADS and Gildas MERCERON. Its objective was to investigate the origins of the e...
Article
Objectives: Topographic estimates of dental relief are now commonly used to make dietary inferences from the teeth of extant and extinct primates. We thoroughly compared commonly used relief estimates in an effort to help researchers decide which variable best suits their objectives. Materials and methods: We combined a total of three datasets:...
Article
Central Africa is known as a major center of diversification for extant Old World Monkeys (OWM) and yet has a poorly documented fossil record of monkeys. Here we report a new colobine monkey (Cercopithecoides bruneti sp. nov.) from the Central African hominin-bearing fossiliferous area of Toros-Menalla, Chad at ca. 7 Ma. In addition to filling a ga...
Article
Enamel thickness is not uniform across the dental crown of primates. It has been suggested that enamel distribution could be used in taxonomy or for ecological inferences. For instance, the thickness of molar enamel in mammals consuming hard food is expected to be uneven, despite differing reports on extant and extinct apes. Overall estimations of...
Presentation
Dental topography is now commonly used to investigate tooth form and function in extinct species. As a growing number of dental topographic variables and applications are made available to paleontologists, choosing the right metric might become increasingly challenging. Furthermore, the risk of combining variables that could be correlated raises co...
Article
A new fossil cranium of a large papionin monkey from the Lower Pleistocene site of Dafnero-3 in Western Macedonia, Greece, is described by means of outer and inner morphological and metric traits using high-resolution micro-computed tomography. Comparisons with modern cercopithecids and contemporaneous Eurasian fossil taxa suggest that the new cran...
Presentation
Enamel thickness is highly susceptible to natural selection because thick enamel may prevent tooth failure when confronted to stress. Consequently, sclerocarpic foraging primates i.e., that devote a significant part of their feeding time to stress limited food such as seeds, are expected to have thick-enameled molars when compared to primates consu...
Article
Extant colobine monkeys have been historically described as specialized folivores. However, reports on both their behavior and dental metrics tend to ascribe a more varied diet to them. In particular, several species, such as Pygathrix nemaeus and Rhinopithecus roxellana, are dedicated seasonal seed eaters. They use the lophs on their postcanine te...
Poster
Full-text available
From a form-function perspective, the occlusal morphology of mammalian teeth results from a compromise between dental occlusion and the necessity to dealwith food. More precisely, general morphology guides lower teeth when they occlude with upper teeth, while fine morphology, akin to "dental tools", reduces and fragments the food.These dental tools...
Poster
Full-text available
Analysis of the external morphological features and the inner structures i.e. the maxillary sinuses of a recently discovered cercopithecine cranium from the lower Pleistocene locality of Dafnero 3 (DFN3), NorthWest Greece, ascribed to either Procynocephalus or Paradolichopithecus.
Article
Full-text available
Enamel thickness is highly susceptible to natural selection because thick enamel may prevent tooth failure. Consequently, it has been suggested that primates consuming stress-limited food on a regular basis would have thick-enameled molars in comparison to primates consuming soft food. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of enamel over a single t...
Article
The vascular network is a major target of ischemia-reperfusion, but has been poorly investigated in renal transplantation. The aim of this study was to characterize the remodeling of the renal vascular network that follows ischemia-reperfusion along with the most highly affected cortex section in a preclinical renal transplantation model. There wer...
Data
Supplemental data. Excel spreadsheets including results of biological parameters and data obtained from processing of high resolution micro-computed tomography acquisition images of renal cortex biopsies. (XLSX)
Article
Although conveying an indisputable morphological and behavioral signal, traditional dietary categories such as frugivorous or folivorous tend to group a wide range of food mechanical properties together. Because food/tooth interactions are mostly mechanical, it seems relevant to investigate the dental morphology of primates based on mechanical cate...
Poster
Full-text available
Objectives: Because thick enamel may prevent tooth failure, enamel production is highly susceptible to natural selection. Consequently, it has been suggested that primates consuming hard or abrasive food on a regular basis have thick-enameled molars in comparison to primates consuming soft food. Furthermore, variation in the spatial distribution of...
Poster
Full-text available
Teeth are usually depicted as tools adapted to specific challenging food. Still, classical dietary categories (folivore, frugivore etc.) may encompass very different dental challenges. Here, we test alternative categories based on the food hardness/toughness and on the actions performed to access/process it. We expect these categories to better des...
Poster
Full-text available
Colobine monkeys have been historically described as specialized folivores, to the point of being dubbed "leaf-eater monkeys". However, reports on both their behavior and dental metrics lead researchers to ascribe them a more contrasted diet. In particular, several species seem to be dedicated seasonal seed eaters. They use the lophs on their post-...
Article
Full-text available
The basicranium and face have been linked through genetic, developmental, and functional relationships throughout their evolution. As a result, basicranial morphology most likely plays a major role in the evolution of facial structures. We describe the relationships between basicranial flexion and the face in Homo, Pan, and Gorilla to determine the...
Article
Full-text available
The HRD1 hominin maxilla was discovered during fieldwork carried out in the Republic of Djibouti, eastern Africa, in the 1980s. The HRD1 specimen is attributed to the genus Homo and has been dated from the Early to the Middle Pleistocene. This paper presents a detailed morphological and quantitative description of the HRD1 maxilla. The morphology o...
Article
Full-text available
The form of two hard tissues of the mammalian tooth, dentine and enamel, is the result of a combination of the phylogenetic inheritance of dental traits and the adaptive selection of these traits during evolution. Recent decades have been significant in unveiling developmental processes controlling tooth morphogenesis, dental variation and the orig...
Chapter
Full-text available
The widespread use of mouse models in developmental, behavioural and genetic studies has sparked wider interest in rodent biology as a whole. This book brings together the latest research on rodents to better understand the evolution of both living and extinct members of this fascinating group. Topics analysed include the role of molecular techniqu...
Article
Full-text available
Extant Pongo diverges from other hominids by a series of craniofacial morphological features, such as a concave face, a reduced supraorbital torus, or an upwardly orientated palate. These traits are not independent because the skull is a complex integrated structure. The aim of this study is to describe the relationship between the face and mandibl...
Article
Full-text available
This contribution contains the 3D reconstruction of Canariomys bravoi, described and figured in the following publication: MMM JOURNAL VOL.1 (1)-e3 METHODS The present three-dimensional reconstruction of the skeleton of the Holocene giant rat of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain) was obtained by computerized microtomography reconstruction. Two distin...
Data
This contribution contains the 3D reconstruction of Canariomys bravoi, described and figured in the following publication: Michaux J., Hautier L., Hutterer R., Lebrun R., Guy F., García-Talavera F., 2012 : Body shape and life style of the extinct rodent Canariomys bravoi (Mammalia, Murinae) from Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain). Comptes Rendus Pale...
Article
Introduction: At the time of transplantation, solid phase-test tends to replace cell-based test. Flow Cytometry Crossmach (FCXM) may help to recognize pathogenic Donor Specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA). This approach is not universally used. Here we reported our experience with DSA+FCXM+ transplantations. Patients: We included 175 sensitized Kidne...
Article
Le réseau microvasculaire est une cible majeure de l’ischémie reperfusion. Le but de cette étude était de caractériser le remodelage vasculaire du cortex rénal après ischémie reperfusion et de déterminer la partie la plus affectée.
Article
Full-text available
This project presents the osteological connections of the petrosal bone of the extant Hippopotamidae Hippopotamus amphibius and Choeropsis liberiensis by a virtual osteological dissection of the ear region. The petrosal, the bulla, the sinuses and the major morphological features surrounding the petrosal bone are labelled, both in situ and in explo...
Article
This paper presents a new aspect in studies of dental morphology based exclusively on 3D topographical analysis. Our method was applied to a set of 20 unworn upper second molars belonging to seven extant catarrhine genera. From a geometrical analysis of the polygonal grid representing the shape of each tooth, we propose a 3D dataset that provides a...
Conference Paper
The face is a complex organization of bones, the morphology of which is partly influenced by the rest of the cranium (e.g., the cranial base and the neurocranium). The characterization of facial morphological variation and craniofacial covariation patterns in extant hominids is fundamental for the understanding of their evolutionary history. While...
Article
Full-text available
The occlusal morphology of the teeth is mostly determined by the enamel-dentine junction morphology; the enamel-dentine junction plays the role of a primer and conditions the formation of the occlusal enamel reliefs. However, the accretion of the enamel cap yields thickness variations that alter the morphology and the topography of the enamel-denti...
Data
Surface alteration between original and decimated OES in two representative molars of Homo (A) and Pan (B). The figure presents the alteration of the decimated surface as the distribution of the minimum distances from original to decimated polygon mesh. Maximum values (in millimeter) are +0.09 and −0.10 in Homo 5 (average +0.0036/−0.0039), and +0.0...
Data
Relative contribution of the partial number of patches at each orientation interval to the total complexity. The complete orientation range is divided in eight orientation intervals of 45° each, each color representing one particular orientation interval. Each ring corresponds to one specimen. The white dot indicates the highest computed (partial)...
Data
Inclination profiles of anthropoid molars. The profile corresponds, for each taxon (average data), to the OES relative proportion of area of expression of inclination intervals (increment is 15°). Note how enamel deposit modifies the inclination profiles of EDJ (Figure 8). (TIF)
Data
Relative area of expression (mm2) of orientation intervals (increment is 45°) for enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) and enamel occlusal surfaces (OES). A, Lagothrix; B, Cercocebus; C, Cercopithecus; D, Papio; E, Hylobates; F, Gorilla; G, Pan; H, Homo. (TIF)
Data
Relationships between number of patches (complexity, ψc) and 3D occlusal area. A, OES, the star and the associated illustrated molar correspond to one chimpanzee specimen (P#2) showing a particularly high number of patch; B, OES, the specimen P#2 has been removed from the analysis; the star and the associated illustrated molar correspond to the sec...
Data
Standardized mean curvature value of enamel-dentine junction surface. The position of each taxon on the graph corresponds to the area proportion of enamel occlusal non-curved surface (left axe, horizontal line is for within taxon average value). The bars illustrate the associate proportion of area of expression of convex (light green)/concave (ligh...
Data
Occlusal relief index in anthropoids. A, relationship between OES and EDJ occlusal relief index (Γ). B, comparison between occlusal relief index for OES (ΓOES) and relief index (RI, sensu Dennis et al., 2004; M'Kirera and Ungar, 2003, Ungar and Williamson 2000). Note the flattening of the RI profile compared to ΓOES. Dennis JC, Ungar, PS, Teaford M...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies showed that in modern humans the basicranium is formed of two modules: the midline cranial base and the lateral basicranium which are integrated with the face in very different ways. The study of the relationship between these structures is of prime interest in the context of hominids craniofacial evolutionary history. In this stud...
Article
Full-text available
The organization of the bony face is complex, its morphology being influenced in part by the rest of the cranium. Characterizing the facial morphological variation and craniofacial covariation patterns in extant hominids is fundamental to the understanding of their evolutionary history. Numerous studies on hominid facial shape have proposed hypothe...
Data
PLS of block 1 (facial block orientation) and 2 (facial shape) after removing allometry in Pan. For legend see figure 4. (TIF)
Data
PLS of block 1 (facial block orientation) and 2 (facial shape) after removing allometry in Homo. For legend see figure 4. (TIF)
Data
PLS of block 1 (facial block orientation) and 2 (facial shape) after removing allometry in Gorilla. For legend see figure 4. (TIF)