Francis B. Musonda

Francis B. Musonda
University of Zambia | UNZA · Department of History

PhD

About

13
Publications
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Full-text available
For more than ninety years, between 1921 and 2012, our knowledge of the Broken Hill Man phase of human evolution has been provided by scholars who have been able to access the skull in England, where it was taken in 1921. This paper presents findings of the circumstances under which the skull was discovered in Northern Rhodesia and taken to England...
Article
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The Chakeluka Heritage site in Lusaka, Zambia, has been controversial since its excavation in the late 1960s. It has been a source of tension between ethnic groups living around the site and the National Heritage Conservation Commission, the body mandated by government to protect and manage heritage resources in Zambia. This paper discusses the his...
Article
Full-text available
The development of archaeology in Zambia under J. Desmond Clark, Brian M. Pagan, David W. Phillipson, Joseph O. Vogel and many others has gone through paradigmatic shifts from Stone Age to Iron Age studies and recently to emphasis on heritage conservation and protection of archaeological sites. Issues that were central to these researchers are disc...
Article
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The future of African archaeology has recently been a major focus of attention by African archaeologists. This article looks at anticipated major advances, and at the expectations and desires of young African archaeologists in the advancement of the discipline. The major constraints to research are identified and solutions to these problems are sug...
Article
Archaeological investigations in the Lunsemfwa Drainage Basin of Zambia have yielded evidence that necessitates modification of current views about the nature of culture contact between hunter-gatherers and agriculturalists. Hypotheses of barter, theft or some kind of exchange network between the two communities are not supported. It is suggested t...
Article
Full-text available
The sand deposits in the Victoria Falls Region are diagnostic of eolian and fluvial environments but the majority of the sand grains are angular in form suggesting that the Kalahari is not their origin and that water is a secondary modification agent. It is suggested that water and wind have played a secondary role in the modification process and t...
Article
This paper discusses soil and wildlife conservation practices in a traditional perspective in Zambia and how these can be integrated in modern methods of conservation practices for sustainable development. -from Author
Article
A detailed analysis of the faunal remains from Mufulwe rock shelter, Zambia, shows that both large and small bovids were hunted, but with a greater emphasis on the latter. Body part frequencies indicate that the degree of meat processing at the site largely depended on the size of the animal and the distance at which the kill was made. It is argued...
Article
Full-text available
Results of excavations at four rock shelter sites in the Lunsemfwa Drainage Basin of Zambia are described. The lithic assemblages are analysed in terms of three successive culture-stratigraphic phases based on changes in tool-type frequencies. The phases are in many respects similar to the Nachikufan sequence. Group I which represents the earliest...

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