Francesco Formaggio

Francesco Formaggio
University of Bologna | UNIBO · Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology FaBiT

Postdoc University of Bologna

About

24
Publications
2,135
Reads
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135
Citations
Introduction
Francesco Formaggio currently works at the Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology FaBiT, University of Bologna. where he is a postdoc researcher. Dr. Formaggio research is focused on Neuroscience, Cell Physiology, and neuropathies. His interests include astroglial physiology, cell volume homeostasis, and neuropathic pain. The most recent publication is "LRRC8A is essential for swelling-activated chloride current and for regulatory volume decrease in astrocytes".
Additional affiliations
January 2017 - present
University of Bologna
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2014 - December 2016
University of Bologna
Position
  • PhD Student
July 2013 - December 2016
Italian National Research Council
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Research assistant in the ISMN-CNR of Bologna to expound “Pathophysiological role of the D184E mutation in the Aquaporin-4 gene in the context of the project “FIRB future in ricerca”
Education
January 2014 - December 2016
University of Bologna
Field of study
  • Neurobiology
October 2006 - March 2013
University of Bologna
Field of study
  • Medical Chemistry

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
Consolidated evidence indicates that astroglial cells are critical in the homeostatic regulation of cellular volume by means of ion channels and aquaporin-4. Volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) is the chloride channel that is activated upon cell swelling and critically contributes to cell volume regulation in astrocytes. The molecular identity of...
Article
Full-text available
Potassium channels and aquaporins expressed by astrocytes are key players in the maintenance of cerebral homeostasis and in brain pathophysiologies. One major challenge in the study of astrocyte membrane channels in vitro, is that their expression pattern does not resemble the one observed in vivo. Nanostructured interfaces represent a significant...
Article
Glioblastoma is among the most aggressive brain tumors and has an exceedingly poor prognosis. Recently, the importance of the tumor microenvironment in glioblastoma cell growth and progression has been emphasized. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) recognizes bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and endogenous ligands originating from dying cells or the ext...
Article
Silk is a natural fibre obtained from the Bombyx mori silkworm cocoons that can be used in a wide range of fields thanks to its inherent multifunctionality. Post-production steps are necessary to impart colour to the fibres to employ the material for optics and photonic applications, such as in fluorescence-based optofluidic devices in lab-on-a-chi...
Article
The use of doped silk fibroin (SF) films and substrates from Bombyx mori cocoons for green nanotechnology and biomedical applications has been recently highlighted. Cocoons from coloured strains of B. mori, such as Golden-Yellow, contain high levels of pigments that could have a huge potential for the fabrication of SF based biomaterials targeted t...
Article
Full-text available
Fabry disease (FD) is a X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficient function of the alpha-galactosidase A (α-GalA) enzyme. α-GalA deficiency leads to multisystemic clinical manifestations caused by the preferential accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3). A hallmark symptom of FD patients is neuropathic pain that appears in the earl...
Article
Full-text available
The capacity of astrocytes to adapt their biochemical and functional features upon physiological and pathological stimuli is a fundamental property at the basis of their ability to regulate the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS). It is well known that in primary cultured astrocytes, the expression of plasma membrane ion channels and tr...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Cell-surface proteins have been widely used as diagnostic and prognostic markers in cancer research, and as targets for the development of anti-cancer agents. So far, very few attempts have been made to characterize the surfaceome of breast cancer patients, particularly in relation with the current molecular breast cancer (BRCA) classi...
Article
Full-text available
Background/aims: The ability of astrocytes to control extracellular volume homeostasis is critical for brain function and pathology. Uncovering the mechanisms of cell volume regulation by astrocytes will be important for identifying novel therapeutic targets for neurological conditions, such as those characterized by imbalances to hydro saline cha...
Article
Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked inherited disorder characterized by glycosphingolipid accumulation due to deficiency of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) enzyme. Chronic pain and mood disorders frequently coexist in FD clinical setting, however underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are still unclear. Here we investigated the mechanical and thermal sen...
Article
In article number 1900264, Annalisa Convertino, Valentina Benfenati, and co‐workers show that a forest of randomly oriented gold coated‐silicon nanowires (Au/SiNWs) induces the differentiation of astrocytes showing complex structural and functional properties in vivo. Tight junctions between the Au/SiNWs‐device and astrocytes processes enables extr...
Article
Astrocytes are non‐neuronal cells that govern the homeostatic regulation of the brain through ions and water transport, and Ca2+‐mediated signaling. As they are tightly integrated into neural networks, label‐free tools that can modulate cell function are needed to evaluate the role of astrocytes in brain physiology and dysfunction. Using live‐cell...
Article
The correct human brain function is dependent on the activity of non‐neuronal cells called astrocytes. The bioelectrical properties of astrocytes in vitro do not closely resemble those displayed in vivo and the former are incapable of generating action potential; thus, reliable approaches in vitro for noninvasive electrophysiological recording of a...
Article
Organic bioelectronics have a huge potential to generate interfaces and devices for the study of brain functions and for the therapy of brain pathologies. In this context, increasing efforts are needed to develop technologies for monitoring and stimulation of nonexcitable brain cells, called astrocytes. Astroglial calcium signaling plays, indeed, a...
Presentation
Full-text available
Neuropathic pain is a hallmark symptom in Fabry disease (FD), a hereditary X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a reduced activity of α-galactosidase A (α-GalA). The α-GalA deficiency results in the progressive accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and globotriaosylsphingosine (lyso-Gb3) in the body fluids and lysosomes of various ce...
Poster
Astrocytes are the most abundant cells in the central nervous system (CNS), where they are involved in homeostasis maintenance, including volume regulation. Recently the molecular identity of the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) has been identified, formed by heteromers of leucine rich repeats protein containing protein 8 (LRRC8), where the me...
Thesis
Full-text available
Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is a highly conserved protein in mammals, since point mutation usually lead to a reduce water permeability. A recent study investigated the effect of a mutation in AQP4 gene in AQP4 membrane protein expression and water permeability. Chloride channels are also involved in the maintenance of homeostasis in the brain and in partic...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
In the laboratory we are facing some issues regarding the mixed genetic background of an old mice transgenic colony (KO for the GAL gene). Since we purchased a new cry-ricovery service, I would like to know which is the best strategy to maintain the colony and set up correct experiments.
These are the devolpment information: "The α-Gal A- targeting vector was designed to replace exon 3 and intron 3 of the galactosidase, alpha (Gla) gene with a neomycin resistance (neo) cassette. The construct was electroporated into 129S4/SvJae-derived J1 embryonic stem (ES) cells. Correctly targeted ES cells were injected into blastocysts and the resulting chimeric males were bred to C57BL/6 females. These mice were maintained on a mixed genetic background prior to sending males to the Repository. Upon arrival, sperm was cryopreserved. To generate our live colony, an aliquot of the frozen sperm was used to fertilize oocytes from B6129SF1/J mice "
Here is the question: since we also perform behavioural studies, which are the best options to minimize the variability from the B6/129 mixed genetic backround? The gene is located on the X chromose and we are mostly interested in hemyzigous KO male mice.
- clean the genetic background vs B6 for 20 generations?
- obtain and maintain heterozigous female mutants and hemyzigous KO males and selectively obtain homozigous mutants for every experiment?
- obtain the F2 homozogous mutants (WT and KO) and separetely breed them.
- use F2 hybrids purchased from the company: " F2 hybrids may be used as physiological controls for targeted mutants (knockouts) with a mixed C57BL/6 x 129 genetic background. However, because of allelic segregation in gametes of the F1 hybrid parents, the genetic backgrounds of individual C57BL/6J x 129 F2 mice vary, and they are only an approximate genetic match to the B6;129 background".
Thank you! Any help will be appreciated.
Francesco
Question
Dear reserch gate community,
I am facing some problems in stimulating DRG neurons in current-clamp to get action potentials. The system is working properly but I do not understand what is the amount of current I am injecting. So far I thought the maximum possible was 100pA in EPC-7, but this current is not enough to stimulate all type of neurons, in my culture system. I have seen other papers where using the EPC-7, they are able to inject 200-300 pA. The problem might be on the hardware or software since I am not very familiar with these instruments. Basically I am not sure how much current I am injecting and what is the max amount i can inject with my system. I used STIM at 0,1 and the configuration shown in the attached images.
Thank you for any help!
Francesco Formaggio

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