Francesca Santostefano

Francesca Santostefano
Université du Québec à Montréal | UQAM · Department of Biological Sciences

PhD

About

15
Publications
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216
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Introduction
Francesca Santostefano currently works at the Department of Biological Sciences, Université du Québec à Montréal. Francesca does research in Behaviour, Ecology, and Evolutionary Biology. Their current project is 'Social Selection in the Wild'.

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
Predator–prey interactions are important drivers of community and ecosystem dynamics. With an online multiplayer videogame, we propose a novel system to explore within population variation in predator hunting mode, and how predator–prey behavioral interactions affect predator hunting success. We empirically examined how four predator foraging behav...
Article
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Phenotypic plasticity is widespread in animals. Still, how plastic responses to predator presence affect traits under sexual selection and influence mating preferences is not well understood. Here, we examined how simulated chronic predator presence during development and acute predator presence during mate choice affect the expression of male seco...
Article
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Additive genetic variance in a trait reflects its potential to respond to selection, which is key for adaptive evolution in the wild. Social interactions contribute to this genetic variation through indirect genetic effects —the effect of an individual's genotype on the expression of a trait in a conspecific. However, our understanding of the evolu...
Article
Full-text available
Through social interactions, phenotypes of conspecifics can affect an individual's fitness, resulting in social selection. Social selection is assumed to represent a strong and dynamic evolutionary force that can act with or in opposition to natural selection. Few studies, however, have estimated social selection and its contribution to total selec...
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Full-text available
Individuals of the same population differ consistently from each other in the average expression of behavioral and physiological traits. Often, such traits are integrated and thus correlated with each other. However, the underlying proximate mechanisms generating and maintaining this among-individual covariation are still poorly understood. The mel...
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The pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis predicts variation in behaviour and physiology among individuals to be associated with variation in life history. Thus, individuals on the “fast” end of POLS continuum grow faster, exhibit higher metabolism, are more risk prone, but die earlier than ones on the “slow” end. Empirical support is nevertheles...
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Polyandry is widespread among many animal taxa, yet the benefits for females are still debated. The two main hypotheses to explain its evolution are the direct benefits and the genetic benefits hypotheses, which are not mutually exclusive. We tested both in the wood tiger moth Arctia plantaginis (Arctiidae) by comparing fitness components in single...
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Behavioural ecology research increasingly focuses on why genetic behavioural variation can persist despite selection. Evolutionary theory predicts that directional selection leads to evolutionary change while depleting standing genetic variation. Nevertheless, evolutionary stasis may occur for traits involved in social interactions. This requires t...
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Full-text available
The pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis predicts associations between life history and 'risky' behaviours. Individuals with 'fast' lifestyles should develop faster, reproduce earlier, exhibit more risk-prone behaviours, and die sooner than those with 'slow' lifestyles. While support for POLS has been equivocal to date, studies have relied on in...
Article
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Recent empirical and conceptual papers have highlighted the potential for metabolism to act as a proximate mechanism for behavior that could explain animal personality (consistency over time). Under this hypothesis, individuals with consistently high levels of behavioral activity should also have high resting metabolic rate (RMR) as it can reflect...
Article
Same-sex sexual behaviour (SSB) represents an emergent trait of two interacting same-sex individuals. Although empirical studies have investigated how social environments can influence SSB, little is known about the effect of the interacting partner and its associated phenotype on SSB. In species where females are larger than males or males express...
Article
In animal contests, individuals respond plastically to the phenotypes of the opponents that they confront. These “opponent”—or “indirect”—effects are often repeatable, for example, certain opponents consistently elicit more or less aggressiveness in others. “Personality” (repeatable among-individual variation in behavior) has been proposed as an im...
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Full-text available
The field of animal personality is interested in decomposing behaviors into different levels of variation, with its present focus on the ecological and evolutionary causes and consequences of expressed variation. Recently the role of the social environment, i.e., social partners, has been suggested to affect behavioral variation and induce selectio...

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