Frances L. Doyle

Frances L. Doyle
Western Sydney University · School of Psychology

PhD, M Clin Psych, B Arts - Psych (Hons), BBA

About

23
Publications
5,380
Reads
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163
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2021 - present
Western Sydney University
Position
  • Lecturer
December 2016 - December 2021
University of Sydney
Position
  • Project Manager
Education
February 2012 - February 2016
Macquarie University
Field of study
  • Clinical Psychology
February 2012 - February 2016
Macquarie University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Objective Given the increasing research and practice interest in father engagement, this article aimed to develop a clinical narrative integrating the extant research literature to distil key practice recommendations for enhancing father engagement in parenting interventions for child wellbeing. Method A narrative review of research on father enga...
Article
Half of all lifetime mental health disorders emerge in childhood, so intervening in the childhood years is critical to prevent chronic trajectories of mental health disorders. The prevalence of child mental health disorders is not decreasing despite the increased availability of evidence-based interventions. One key reason for the high prevalence a...
Article
Full-text available
Background: From birth, the human propensity to selectively attend and respond to critical super-stimuli forms the basis of future socio-emotional development and health. In particular, the first super-stimuli to preferentially engage and elicit responses in the healthy newborn are the physical touch, voice and face/eyes of caregivers. From this gr...
Article
Full-text available
The disruption of normal life due to the COVID-19 pandemic is expected to exacerbate extant risk factors for mental health problems. This may be particularly true for women who give birth during the crisis, especially those at risk for postnatal depression. Maternal postnatal depression has been identified as a public health issue with profound imp...
Article
Full-text available
Objective Children with a behaviorally inhibited temperament during early childhood have been shown to have an increased risk for developing anxiety disorders. This study evaluated the efficacy of an anxiety prevention program aimed at reducing the risk of anxiety in behaviorally inhibited preschool children. Method Participants were 86 children a...
Article
Full-text available
Maternal-infant bonding is important for children’s positive development. Poor maternal-infant bonding is a risk factor for negative mother and infant outcomes. Although researchers have examined individual predictors of maternal-infant bonding, studies typically do not examine several concurrent and longitudinal predictors within the same model. T...
Article
Full-text available
Cognitive behavioural therapy is the first line of treatment for social anxiety disorder; however, children with social anxiety disorder do not respond as well to generic cognitive behavioural therapy programs, compared to children with other anxiety disorders. The aim of the study was to provide a preliminary examination of the efficacy and applic...
Article
There is tentative evidence that infants can learn preferences through evaluative conditioning to socioemotional stimuli. However, the early development of evaluative conditioning and the factors that may explain infants’ capacity to learn through evaluative conditioning are not well understood. Infants (N = 319; 50.2% boys) participated in a longi...
Article
Objectives: Parenting is central to children's optimal development and accounts for a substantial proportion of the variance in child outcomes, including up to 40% of child mental health. Parenting is also one of the most modifiable, proximal, and direct factors for preventing and treating a range of children's problems and enhancing wellbeing. To...
Article
Full-text available
Parents can be essential change-agents in their children’s lives. To support parents in their parenting role, a range of programs have been developed and evaluated. In this paper, we provide an overview of the evidence for the effectiveness of parenting interventions for parents and children across a range of outcomes, including child and adolescen...
Article
Contemporary theories of early development and emerging child psychopathology all posit a major, if not central role for physiological responsiveness. To understand infants’ potential risk for emergent psychopathology, consideration is needed to both autonomic reactivity and environmental contexts (e.g., parent–child interactions). The current stud...
Article
An attentional bias toward threat has been theorized to be a normative aspect of infants' threat and safety learning, and an indicator of risk for internalizing psychopathology in older populations. To date, only four studies have examined this bias using the dot-probe task in infancy and the findings are mixed. We extended the literature by examin...
Article
Full-text available
Research investigating social anxiety and the impacts on romantic relationships remains scarce. An online questionnaire examining romantic relationship status, social anxiety and depression symptomology, relationship satisfaction, and several relationship processes was completed by 444 adults. Individuals with higher social anxiety were less likely...
Preprint
Full-text available
The ability to learn and apply rules lies at the heart of cognition. In a seminal study, Marcus, Vijayan, Rao, and Vishton (1999) reported that seven-month-old infants learned abstract rules over syllable sequences and were able to generalize those rules to novel syllable sequences. Dozens of studies have since extended on that research using diffe...
Preprint
Parents can be essential change-agents in their children’s lives. To support parents in their parenting role, a range of programs have been developed and evaluated. In this paper, we provide an overview of the evidence for the effectiveness of parenting interventions for parents and children across a range of outcomes, including child and adolescen...
Article
Full-text available
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been associated with a range of physical and mental health problems, and it is now understood that the developmental timing of ACEs may be critically important. Despite this, there is a distinct lack of methods for the efficient assessment of such timing in research and clinical settings. We report on the d...
Article
Full-text available
Fathers are underrepresented in interventions focussing on child well-being, yet research suggests their involvement may be critical to enhancing intervention effectiveness. This study aimed to provide the first Australian benchmark of rates of father attendance across several child mental health services. Retrospective casefile reviews were conduc...
Article
This study investigated the relationship between children’s proneness to endorse moral disengagement mechanisms and their anticipated antisocial lie telling. Participants were 107 predominantly white Australian children in Grade 1 (27 boys, 27 girls; Mage = 6.69 years) and Grade 4 (24 boys, 29 girls; Mage = 9.69 years). Children completed a lie-tel...
Article
Full-text available
Using a multi-method approach, this study examined differences in parental meta-emotional philosophy (including, parental emotional awareness and emotion coaching) for families with anxiety disordered (AD; n = 74) and non-AD (n = 35) children (aged 7 to 15). Further, it was investigated whether children's emotion regulation (ER) varied across the A...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, a new measure of moral disengagement tailored to physical punishment was developed. Moral disengagement is the selective disengagement of moral standards so that in certain situations unacceptable behavior can be performed without anticipatory self-censure for engaging in such conduct. In order to comprehensively examine the social c...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The ‘Watch Me Grow For REAL’ project is a longitudinal, prospective birth-cohort study based in South-Western Sydney, Australia. The key focus of this project is to map the emergence of individual differences and disturbances in the system of social-Responsiveness, Emotional Attention, and Learning (REAL) through the first three years of life to predict the specific emergence of the major childhood mental health problems, as well as social adjustment and impairment more generally. A further aim, is to examine how the REAL variables interact with the quality of environment/caregiver interactions. This study will be the first to test a clear developmental map of both the unique and specific causes of childhood psychopathology, and will identify more precise early intervention targets for children with complex comorbid conditions.