Frances Boreham

Frances Boreham
University of Bristol | UB · School of Earth Sciences

BEng Mechanical Engineering, MSc Thermal Power and Fluid Engineering

About

6
Publications
891
Reads
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9
Citations
Introduction
Frances Boreham is studying for a PhD at the School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, focusing on physical volcanology. She was originally an engineer, and worked in the aerospace industry for several years before deciding to move into geology. For her PhD, Frances is working on rootless eruptions: steam explosions caused by lava flows interacting with environmental water such as lakes, rivers and wetlands. She is bringing together field observations, satellite imagery and high resolution DEMs to look at variation in rootless cone morphology, how it relates to lava flow emplacement and available water, and what this tells us about the dynamics of lava-water interaction.
Additional affiliations
September 2015 - March 2020
University of Bristol
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Research investigating the mechanisms governing lava-water interactions and the resulting impacts and hazards
September 2015 - September 2018
University of Bristol
Position
  • Demonstrator
Description
  • Classroom and laboratory based teaching practical exercises for undergraduate modules: Physical Volcanology, Physics for Earth Sciences, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Basic MATLAB, Intermediate MATLAB, 1-to-1 mentoring for MSc Volcanology student
August 2013 - July 2015
Rolls-Royce
Position
  • Engineer
Description
  • Whole engine development engineer for Trent XWB-97 civil engine, focussing on product maturity, endurance testing and structured verification.
Education
September 2015 - April 2020
University of Bristol
Field of study
  • Volcanology
September 2010 - September 2011
The University of Manchester
Field of study
  • Thermal Power and Fluid Engineering
September 2007 - July 2010
The University of Manchester
Field of study
  • Mechanical Engineering

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Full-text available
It is well established that rootless cones and associated deposits are the result of explosive interactions between lava flows and environmental water, but there is substantial uncertainty about the dynamics of rootless eruptions, particularly the relative importance of lava supply, water availability and the conditions under which they meet. Here...
Presentation
Full-text available
Lava¬¬-water interactions (LWIs) are rarely considered in lava flow hazard assessments or emergency planning scenarios, though they can generate a range of secondary hazards, including tephra blasts, rootless eruptions, disruption to water supplies, and flooding. These hazards may endanger life, damage property, and hinder evacuation or rescue effo...
Article
Full-text available
Interactions between lava flows and surface water are not always considered in hazard assessments, despite abundant historical and geological evidence that they can create significant secondary hazards (e.g., floods and steam explosions). We combine contemporary accounts of the 1783−1784 Laki fissure eruption in southern Iceland with morphological...
Poster
Full-text available
This poster looks at the interaction between the 1783-84 Laki lava flow and the local rivers based on contemporary accounts, lava flow morphology and rootless cone deposits. It highlights the secondary hazards associated with lava-river interactions: lava flow diversion, flooding, rootless eruptions and contaminated water.
Poster
Full-text available
We use the distribution of rootless cones around Lake Myvatn in NE Iceland to infer the extent of the lake before it was inundated by the Younger Laxa Lava, extended the boundary of the lake beyond previous estimates. We also discuss likely syn-eruptive lake level changes with respect to the rootless cones. Our proposed lake extent also explains...
Poster
Full-text available
Rootless cones form by explosive interaction interaction between between a lava flow and environmental water, e.g.lakes lakes or rivers, and are abundant in Iceland and several other locations on Earth and Mars .They come in a variety of shapes and sizes sizes but are often often too small to be visible in available digital terrain models (DTMs). P...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The dynamics of lava-water interactions (LWI) and the type of deposits produced are affected by the lava flow properties, available water and the degree of mingling between the two. However, there is still substantial uncertainty around the role of each variable and how it affects the morphology, texture and spacing of rootless cones. Through field observations, satellite imagery and high resolution DEMs, I'm looking at how variation in rootless cones is affected by the emplacement style of the lava flow and the availability of water in the environment to try and understand how these factors affect the dynamics of lava-water interactions.