Forrest Joseph Bowlick

Forrest Joseph Bowlick
University of Massachusetts Amherst | UMass Amherst · Department of Geosciences and Department of Environmental Conservation

PhD

About

22
Publications
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94
Citations
Introduction

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Full-text available
Exploring the 260 AVAs in the United States is an exciting journey in geographic variation. An under-explored area of interest is the Nutmeg State – Connecticut. Despite ranking in the bottom quarter of wine producing states, Connecticut’s wine geography is varied and nuanced. With three distinct AVAs, 79 bonded wineries, and hundreds of millions o...
Article
Full-text available
Small area estimation is a powerful modeling technique in which ancillary data can be utilized to “borrow” additional information, effectively increasing sample sizes in small spatial, temporal, or categorical domains. Though more commonly applied to biophysical variables within the study of forest inventory analyses, small area estimation can also...
Article
Geographic Information Science (GIS) is fully embedded as a foundational information technology across domains and areas of practice. With this significance, the nature of the knowledge, skills, and practices in GIS requires regular reflection to quantify how GIS learning is structured, and to understand what the next generation of GIS professional...
Article
We report the findings from two global panel "conversations" that, stimulated by the exceptional coronavirus pandemic of 2020/21, explored the concept of resilience in geographic science teaching and learning. Characteristics of resilient teaching, both in general and with reference to GISc, are listed and shown to be essentially what might in the...
Article
Since 1950, tornadoes have accounted for nearly one third of disaster-related fatalities in the United States, the third high- est after floods and lightning. The largest share of fatalities occurred in the state of Texas, which also accounts for about 7 percent of the overall property damage from tornadoes. An increasing proportion of tornadoes oc...
Article
Students in geographic information systems and science (GIS) require significant experience outside of spatial analysis, cartography, and other traditional geographic topics. Computer science knowledge, skills, and practices exist as essential components of GIS practice, but coursework in this area is not universally offered in geography or GIS deg...
Article
Understanding of fundamentals of computer science and abilities in programming are becoming more important components of the GIS practitioner's skillset. As the frontiers of GIS expand into areas of inquiry and modes of operation which require such domain capabilities, teaching and instruction in GIS must begin that shift as well. And while the kno...
Article
The unprecedented availability of geospatial data and technologies is driving innovation and discovery but not without the risk of losing focus on the geographic foundations of space and place in this vast “cyber sea” of data and technology. There is a pressing need to educate a new generation of scientists and citizens who understand how space and...
Article
Full-text available
Salt marsh ecology classification is difficult using traditional coarse resolution remote sensing techniques. Salt marshes exhibit a spatial pattern of vegetation zonation that are visually identifiable using imagery that has an improved 0.04 meter per pixel resolution. This project applies high resolution unmanned aerial system (UAS) imagery to ai...
Article
Full-text available
The debate regarding geographic information systems (GIS) as tool, toolbox, or science still lingers in geography departments and among geographers. Analysis of geographic information is a vital component of decision making among business, governments, researchers, and academics. GIS users, geographers and nongeographers alike, use and benefit from...
Article
Geographic information systems (GIS) are fundamental information technologies. The capabilities and applications of GIS continue to rapidly expand, requiring practitioners to have new skills and competencies, especially in computer science. There is little research, however, about how best to prepare the next generation of GIScientists with adequat...
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes an experience implementing a new lab manual for 25 sections of an introductory physical geography laboratory course at Texas A&M University, for the purpose of providing recommendations for educators looking to develop and incorporate new course materials. Transparency, communication, and feedback were key components in the suc...
Article
Full-text available
Introductory courses in Geographic Information Science (GIS) expose students to the concepts and practices necessary for future academic and professional use of GIS tools. Traditional GIS courses balance lectures in the theories of GIS with pre-built and pre-packaged lab activities to learn the practices of GIS. This article presents a case study o...
Article
Full-text available
The Palouse is a unique region of loessal hills and astoundingly productive agriculture. Located generally in the inland Pacific Northwest, the Palouse lacks a rigid definition, and varying fields define the Palouse with widely different limits and boundaries. We provide a method using overlap analysis in a geographic information system (GIS) analy...
Article
This case study surveyed students in geography courses at the University of Idaho, investigating perceptions of geography's role in their daily lives, relevance to careers or academics, and parts of their geographic skill. Primarily, white, younger than 20, gender-balanced students in Introduction to Physical Geography and Human Geography courses c...
Article
Full-text available
Helium is an Earth scarce element primarily recognized for its properties as a lifting gas and cooling agent. Industries compete for helium supply as supply declines on Earth. An analysis of production history and industrial needs reveals that helium's dwindling supply will affect its future use. While advanced helium fusion could provide immense s...

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