Foodengine Team

Foodengine Team
A Marie Curie Innovative training network (ITN-ETN). This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement N° 765415​.

Food science and technology

About

Introduction
Hi! We are the FOODENGINE Team. We are composed of highly motivated young professionals in the field of food science and technology and we would like share our passion by reaching out to you! Yay! We'll be happy to answer your questions related to our field, to share some discussions, and be updated on the latest news and discoveries! You can know more about the project by visiting our website: https://foodengine.eu/
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - December 2021
University of Copenhagen
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2018 - December 2021
KU Leuven
Position
  • PhD stduents
September 2018 - December 2021

Questions

Question (1)
Question
We, FOODENGINE, are generally looking for insights on different extraction procedures for saponins in edible legumes without the application of any thermal treatment throughout the process.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Projects

Projects (13)
Project
This project aims to give valuable insights about the barriers and drivers of pulse consumption resulting in strategies to support the inclusion of pulses in a diet.
Project
1. To study the effect of different heat treatments on the physico-chemical parameters of a tomato soup across its shelf-life period 2. To study the effects of heat treatments and storage conditions on the sensory attributes and consumer acceptance of a tomato soup
Project
The study aims to create a link between instrumental and sensory measurements of the flavour of vegetable- and legume-based food systems with the focus on predicting changes over storage. The first study will focus on a tomato soup model system, in order to detect aroma changes and off-flavour development across the shelf-life. The aim is first to understand the chemistry behind the aroma changes, and second to establish a model which allows the prediction of sensory changes at different temperatures during storage and how these changes influence the shelf-life. The second study will be a comparative study of three selected pulses to explore the differences of their aroma profiles and sensory properties and how these are affected by the storage age of the raw material and sterilization temperature during processing. The three selected pulses are Red Kidney bean, Pinto bean and Great Northern bean. Finally, the flavour of Great Northern beans will be investigated in-depth across the shelf-life period to create a similar predictive model as for the tomato soup model system. Throughout these studies the evolution of aroma of vegetable- and legume-based food systems will be observed to determine the influence of their volatile composition and sensory quality on the shelf-life. The combination of various instrumental and sensory measurements will allow for a deeper understanding of the aroma release and perception, so that a science-based approach can be developed to predict and control food quality and changes in regard to aroma over shelf-life.