Floris M van Beest

Floris M van Beest
Aarhus University | AU · Department of Ecoscience

PhD

About

108
Publications
35,183
Reads
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3,227
Citations
Citations since 2017
57 Research Items
2648 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500600
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500600
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500600
Additional affiliations
March 2016 - present
Aarhus University
Position
  • Senior Researcher
September 2013 - February 2016
Aarhus University
Position
  • Researcher
October 2011 - August 2013
University of Saskatchewan
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
June 2007 - November 2010
Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), Department of Biology, University of Oslo
Field of study
  • Movement ecology

Publications

Publications (108)
Article
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Background: In highly seasonal environments, animals face critical decisions regarding time allocation, diet optimisation, and habitat use. In the Arctic, the short summers are crucial for replenishing body reserves, while low food availability and increased energetic demands characterise the long winters (9-10 months). Under such extreme seasonal...
Article
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The existence and persistence of rhythmicity in animal activity during phases of environmental change is of interest in ecology, evolution and chronobiology. A wide diversity of biological rhythms in response to exogenous conditions and internal stimuli have been uncovered, especially for polar vertebrates. However, empirical data supporting circad...
Article
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Species conservation in a rapidly changing world requires an improved understanding of how individuals and populations respond to changes in their environment across temporal scales. Increased warming in the Arctic puts this region at particular risk for rapid environmental change, with potentially devastating impacts on resident populations. Here,...
Article
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Aim The Arctic is one of the planet's most rapidly warming regions, with trends expected to intensify in the future. Projections of shifts in species distributional ranges under future climate change are thus far lacking for most vertebrate species using the Arctic tundra. Our aim was to assess possible climate‐induced changes in distributional ran...
Article
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Extreme weather events are increasing in frequency and intensity across the Arctic, one of the planet's most rapidly warming regions. Studies from southern latitudes have revealed that the ecological impacts of extreme events on living organisms can be severe and long-lasting, yet data and evidence from within the terrestrial Arctic biome appear un...
Article
Human activities at sea are intensifying and diversifying. This is leading to more complex interactions of anthropogenic impacts requiring adaptable management interventions to mitigate their cumulative effects on biodiversity conservation and restoration objectives. Bycatch remains the dominant conservation threat for coastal cetaceans. Additional...
Article
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Understanding how environmental and climate change can alter habitat overlap of marine predators has great value for the management and conservation of marine ecosystems. Here, we estimated spatiotemporal changes in habitat suitability and inter‐specific overlap among three marine predators: Baltic gray seals (Halichoerus grypus), harbor seals (Pho...
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Aim: Macroecological studies that require habitat suitability data for many species often derive this information from expert opinion. However, expert-based information is inherently subjective and thus prone to errors. The increasing availability of GPS tracking data offers opportunities to evaluate and supplement expert-based information with de...
Preprint
Resource selection analysis (RSA) is a cornerstone approach for understanding animal distributions, yet there exists no rigorous quantification of sample sizes required to obtain reliable results. We provide closed-form mathematical expressions for both the number of animals and relocations per animal required for parameterising RSA to a given degr...
Article
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In a recent paper in Ecological Indicators, Kiełpińska and Kowalski (K&K) present a model aimed to facilitate culling of a large fraction of the Baltic grey seal population without sacrificing management aims with regard to distribution. Their paper and model include several flawed assumptions with regard to grey seal biology, particularly life his...
Article
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1. Sample size sufficiency is a critical consideration for estimating Resource‐Selection Functions (RSFs) from GPS‐based animal telemetry. Cited thresholds for sufficiency include a number of captured animals M ≥ 30 and as many relocations per animal N as possible. These thresholds render many RSF‐based studies misleading if large sample sizes were...
Article
Non-native trees profoundly alter the structure and resilience of native forest ecosystems through direct or indirect effects on ecosystem processes, e.g. by altering invertebrate communities, but such effects are poorly understood in New Zealand. We sampled adjacent stands of the non-native tree Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and native beech...
Article
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Bio-logging technology is now the golden standard for assessing how individual animals change their movement and behavior over time and space. Three-dimensional accelerometer data, in particular , can provide extremely detailed information on individuals' activity and energetics associated with critical life-history events, such as reproduction and...
Article
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Habitat selection is expected to balance benefits and costs that maximizes fitness. Using a rare data set on collared lemming (Dicrostonyx groenlandicus) winter nest location spanning more than two decades, we show that lemmings actively select for Salix snow beds, likely due to its favorable micro-climate, and that lemming habitat selection was de...
Article
Harbour seals are surveyed aerially when they haul-out to moult in August. The proportion of the population hauled out throughout the year is related to temporal, environmental, and meteorological variables. Thus, monitoring is conducted under predefined ranges of conditions. Effects of variation within these ranges are rarely reviewed. We used lin...
Article
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Abstract Harbour porpoises frequently alter their behaviour in response to underwater sound from shipping, seismic surveys, drilling and marine renewables. Less well understood is the response of porpoises to sounds emitted from oil and gas (O&G) platforms during routine operations. The responses are not easily predicted as platforms can act simult...
Preprint
Sample size sufficiency is a critical consideration for conducting Resource-Selection Analyses (RSAs) from GPS-based animal telemetry. Cited thresholds for sufficiency include a number of captured animals M ≥ 30 and as many relocations per animal N as possible. These thresholds render many RSA-based studies misleading if large sample sizes were tru...
Article
Non-native trees profoundly alter the structure and resilience of native forest ecosystems through direct or indirect effects on ecosystem processes, e.g. by altering invertebrate communities, but such effects are poorly understood in New Zealand. We sampled adjacent stands of the non-native tree Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and native beech...
Article
Full-text available
Decision-support tools (DSTs) synthesize complex information to assist environmental managers in the decision-making process. Here, we review DSTs applied in the Baltic Sea area, to investigate how well the ecosystem approach is reflected in them, how different environmental problems are covered, and how well the tools meet the needs of the end use...
Article
Assessing the migratory behaviour of individual and groups of animals is key to understand the function of migration, its evolution, and how it is affected by environment and human activities. In the eastern North Atlantic, killer whales (Orcinus orca) presumably track herring stocks as they migrate between across the region. However, the detailed...
Article
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Animals have adapted behavioral and physiological strategies to conserve energy during periods of adverse conditions. Heterothermy is one such adaptation used by endotherms. While heterothermy—fluctuations in body temperature and metabolic rate—has been shown in large vertebrates, little is known of the costs and benefits of this strategy, both in...
Article
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Decision support tools (DSTs), like models, GIS-based planning tools and assessment tools, play an important role in incorporating scientific information into decision-making and facilitating policy implementation. In an interdisciplinary Baltic research group, we compiled 43 DSTs developed to support ecosystem-based management of the Baltic Sea an...
Article
Dynamic energy budget individual-based models (DEB-IBMs) provide a well-tested framework for modelling the acquisition and use of energy throughout the life cycle of organisms. These models are often developed using species-specific data to link behaviour and physiology and predict how individuals and populations perform in changing environments. N...
Article
Ecosystems around the world are increasingly exposed to multiple, often interacting human activities, leading to pressures and possibly environmental state changes. Decision support tools (DSTs) can assist environmental managers and policy makers to evaluate the current status of ecosystems (i.e. assessment tools) and the consequences of alternativ...
Article
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Facilitated by a receding sea ice extent, new and shorter routes have led to increased maritime traffic in Arctic areas with an inherent risk for oil spills along Arctic rocky shorelines. To estimate natural oil removal under Arctic conditions, a crude oil and a heavy fuel oil were applied to slate tiles, mimicking rocky shore substratum, and place...
Article
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The harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) is a small marine predator with a high conservation status in Europe and the USA. To protect the species effectively, it is crucial to under-stand its movement patterns and how the distribution of intensively used foraging areas can be predicted from environmental conditions. Here, we investigated the influe...
Article
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The effect of food provisioning on ranging patterns of long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in non- anthropogenic areas is largely unknown, as most published studies have focused on urban macaques. In this study, we quantified habitat selection, daily path length and home range size in long-tailed macaques in Baluran National Park, East Java,...
Article
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Research of many mammal species tends to focus on single habitats, reducing knowledge of ecological flexibility. The Javan lutung (Trachypithecus auratus) is considered a strict forest primate, and little is known about populations living in savannah. In 2017–2018, we investigated the density and distribution of Javan lutung in Baluran National Par...
Article
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For free-ranging animals living in seasonal environments, hypometabolism (lowered metabolic rate) and hypothermia (lowered body temperature) can be effective physiological strategies to conserve energy when forage resources are low. to what extent such strategies are adopted by large mammals living under extreme conditions, as those encountered in...
Article
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The most common cetacean in the North Sea is the harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena). Underwater noise is increasingly recognized as a source of impact on the marine environment and seismic airguns were one of the first man-made high intensity sound source to receive attention with respect to potential impact on marine mammals. In this study, we in...
Article
Due to increased sea transport and offshore gas and oil exploration, the Arctic is facing an unprecedented risk of marine oil spills. Although beached oil spills can lead to acute and chronic impacts on intertidal ecosystems, the effects of oil spills on macro-algae in Arctic ecosystems is lacking. Here, we assessed the effect and response of the t...
Article
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Knowledge about distribution of primate species and their densities is crucial for conservation and management. However, such information is often lacking or anecdotal, even for seemingly abundant species. Long‐tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are distributed across southeast Asia and recognized by the International Union for Conservation of N...
Article
Understanding how environmental conditions influence habitat selection and suitability of free-ranging animals is critical as the outcome may have implications for individual fitness and population dynamics. Density and snow are among the most influential environmental conditions driving habitat selection patterns of northern ungulates. We used two...
Article
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Quantifying spatial and temporal variation in habitat suitability is crucial to understand changes in animal distribution and to inform conservation and management initiatives, especially for species occupying regions profoundly impacted by climatic and environmental change. A detailed understanding of the environmental conditions shaping seasonal...
Article
Energy is a critical driver of animal life-history traits and Darwinian fitness, with direct implications for population dynamics. In the Arctic, extreme seasonal climatic conditions dictate energy flow and physiology of resident species. Consequently, vital rates of animal populations in the Arctic are tightly linked to climatic factors influencin...
Article
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Classifying movement behaviour of marine predators in relation to anthropogenic activity and environmental conditions is important to guide marine conservation. We studied the relationship between grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) behaviour and environmental variability in the southwestern Baltic Sea where seal-fishery conflicts are increasing. We use...
Article
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are found in high concentrations in the Arctic. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are one of the most exposed mammals in the Arctic, biomagnifying POPs and are thereby vulnerable to reproductive disruption. The aim of this study was to describe male polar bear reproduction based on detailed evaluation of testes hist...
Article
Invasive species are a major contributor to biodiversity loss worldwide. Wild pigs (Sus scrofa (L., 1758)) are highly invasive in their introduced ranges; they modify habitat and threaten native species. As recent invaders in Canada, it is unknown what habitats wild pigs occupy at the northern edge of their range and how they affect mammalian diver...
Method
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This is a TRACE document ("TRAnsparent and Comprehensive model Evaludation"), which provides supporting evidence that our model presented in: Nabe-Nielsen J., van Beest F.M., Grimm V., Sibly R.M., Teilmann, J. & Thompson, P.M. (2018). Predicting the impacts of anthropogenic disturbances on marine populations. Conserv. Lett. was thoughtfully designe...
Article
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Marine ecosystems are increasingly exposed to anthropogenic disturbances that cause animals to change behavior and move away from potential foraging grounds. Here we present a process-based modeling framework for assessing population consequences of such sub-lethal behavioral effects. It builds directly on how disturbances influence animal movement...
Article
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Quantifying intraspecific variation in movement behaviour of marine predators and the underlying environmental drivers is important to inform conservation management of protected species. Here, we provide the first empirical data on fine-scale movements of free-ranging harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) in their natural habitat. Data were obtain...
Article
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Restrictions on roaming Until the past century or so, the movement of wild animals was relatively unrestricted, and their travels contributed substantially to ecological processes. As humans have increasingly altered natural habitats, natural animal movements have been restricted. Tucker et al. examined GPS locations for more than 50 species. In ge...
Article
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Knowledge about the impact of anthropogenic disturbances on the behavioural responses of cetaceans is constrained by lack of data on fine-scale movements of individuals. We equipped five free-ranging harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) with high-resolution location and dive loggers and exposed them to a single 10 inch3 underwater airgun producing...
Article
We discuss the notorious problem of order selection in hidden Markov models, that is of selecting an adequate number of states, highlighting typical pitfalls and practical challenges arising when analyzing real data. Extensive simulations are used to demonstrate the reasons that render order selection particularly challenging in practice despite th...
Article
Understanding source dynamics of invasive species is crucial to their management. Free-ranging wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have caused considerable ecological and agricultural damage throughout their global range, including Canada. Objectives were to assess the spatial and temporal patterns in domestic wild boar and test the propagule pressure hypothesi...
Article
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Unintentional mortality of higher trophic-level species in commercial fisheries (bycatch) represents a major conservation concern as it may influence the long-term persistence of populations. An increasingly common strategy to mitigate bycatch of harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), a small and protected marine top predator, involves the use of pi...
Article
Hidden Markov models (HMMs) are commonly used to model animal movement data and infer aspects of animal behavior. An HMM assumes that each data point from a time series of observations stems from one of $N$ possible states. The states are loosely connected to behavioral modes that manifest themselves at the temporal resolution at which observations...
Article
We discuss the notorious problem of order selection in hidden Markov models, i.e. of selecting an adequate number of states, highlighting typical pitfalls and practical challenges arising when analyzing real data. Extensive simulations are used to demonstrate the reasons that render order selection particularly challenging in practice despite the c...
Article
Full-text available
Detailed knowledge on movement behaviour of free-ranging muskoxen Ovibos moschatus is currently lacking. Quantifying variation in individual movement and the variables driving such patterns is important to understand how they meet their basic requirements and to inform management. Because muskoxen exist in nutrient-poor systems with extreme climati...
Article
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We quantified the effect of multiple environmental and biological determinants on variation in home range size across multiple spatial (total-home range–core-home range areas) and temporal (seasonal and all seasons combined) scales for 22 adult female polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from Svalbard, Norway (2003–2011). We also evaluated if considering...
Article
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Effective species conservation and management requires information on species distribution patterns, which is challenging for highly mobile and cryptic species that may be subject to multiple anthropogenic stressors across international boundaries. Understanding species-habitat relationships can improve the assessment of trends and distribution by...
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Context Spatial scale is an important consideration for understanding how animals select habitat, and multi-scalar designs in resource selection studies have become increasingly common. Despite this, examination of functional responses in habitat selection at multiple scales is rare. The perceptual range of an animal changes as a function of vegeta...
Article
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the Wild Boar (Sus scrofa) is invasive in western Canada and poses a significant ecological and socio-economic threat over much of the country. We sought to quantify their presence and to determine when they are most active and whether their activity patterns are influenced by group size. Digital trail cameras (n = 18) were placed in a stratified d...
Article
Habitat selection is complex due to density dependence and functional responses, defined as variation in relative habitat use depending on availability. In this study we unite these concepts by empirically testing for density-dependent functional responses in habitat selection using a large herbivore, elk Cervus canadensis manitobensis, as a model...
Article
Quantifying overlap in habitat selection patterns of coexisting species is a prerequisite for effective conservation and species management. In the agriculture-dominated landscapes of North America, commercial crops are used extensively by free-ranging elk (Cervus canadensis), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virgi...
Article
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Understanding how animals select for habitat and foraging resources therein is a crucial component of basic and applied ecology. The selection process is typically influenced by a variety of environmental conditions including the spatial and temporal variation in the quantity and quality of food resources, predation or disturbance risks, and inter-...
Article
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Optimal foraging theory addresses one of the core challenges of ecology: predicting the distribution and abundance of species. Tests of hypotheses of optimal foraging, however, often focus on a single conceptual model rather than drawing upon the collective body of theory, precluding generalization. Here we demonstrate links between two established...