Florian D. Schneider

Florian D. Schneider
Institute for Social-Ecological Research | ISOE · Biodiversity and People

Dr. rer. nat.

About

40
Publications
17,966
Reads
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1,013
Citations
Additional affiliations
May 2019 - present
Institute for Social-Ecological Research
Position
  • Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter
January 2018 - present
N.A.
Position
  • Researcher
December 2017 - July 2018
Technische Universität Darmstadt
Position
  • Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
Full-text available
Insect declines and biodiversity loss have attracted much attention in recent years, but lack of comprehensive data, conflicting interests among stakeholders and insufficient policy guidance hinder progress in preserving biodiversity. The project DINA (Diversity of Insects in Nature protected Areas) investigates insect communities in 21 nature rese...
Article
Full-text available
Dryland ecosystems are likely to respond discontinuously to gradual changes in environmental conditions. Direct facilitation between plants, whereby plants improve the local environmental conditions for others, has been shown to be a mechanism contributing to these discontinuous ecosystem transitions. Theoretical models describing dryland vegetatio...
Article
Full-text available
The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake. The 2nd affiliation of Sonia Kéfi was missing
Article
Full-text available
Non-technical summary Investing in stricter biodiversity conservation and wildlife protection to reduce the number of emerging diseases and, consequently, the risk of pandemics such as coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19), must integrate a social-ecological perspective. Biodiversity conservation, in order to be effective as disease prevention, require...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Konzeptpapier für eine vertikale Begrünung mit Moosen im Citytunnel der Stadt Darmstadt zur Reduzierung von Luftschadstoffen
Article
Full-text available
Beitrag zum Blog „Soziale Ökologie. Krise – Kritik – Gestaltung“ des ISOE – Institut für sozial-ökologische Forschung https://isoe.blog/praevention-von-zoonosen-durch-biodiversitaetsschutz-eine-sozial-oekologische-aufgabe/ COVID-19 hat seinen Ursprung in wildlebenden Tieren und konnte sehr wahrscheinlich im Zusammenhang mit Wildtierhandel auf den...
Article
Full-text available
One of the most challenging issues in Mediterranean ecosystems to date has been to understand the emergence of discontinuous changes or catastrophic shifts. In the era of the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, which encompass ideas around Land Degradation Neutrality, advancing this understanding has become even more critical and urgent. The aim of...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Der wissenschaftliche Befund eines flächenhaften Insektenrückgangs hat eine ge-sellschaftliche Auseinandersetzung mit den Ursachen und Handlungsmöglichkeiten, insbesondere in der landwirtschaftlichen Praxis, ausgelöst. Diese Studie arbeitet die zentralen Themenstränge im Diskurs um den Insektenschutz in der agrarischen Kultur-landschaft Deutschland...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
Full-text available
Synthesizing trait observations and knowledge across the Tree of Life remains a grand challenge for biodiversity science. Species traits are widely used in ecological and evolutionary science, and new data and methods have proliferated rapidly. Yet accessing and integrating disparate data sources remains a considerable challenge, slowing progress t...
Article
Full-text available
1.Trait‐based approaches are widespread throughout ecological research as they offer great potential to achieve a general understanding of a wide range of ecological and evolutionary mechanisms. Accordingly, a wealth of trait data is available for many organism groups, but this data is underexploited due to a lack of standardisation and heterogenei...
Article
Full-text available
Trait-based research spans from evolutionary studies of individual-level properties to global patterns of biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. An increasing number of trait data is available for many different organism groups, published as open access data on a variety of file hosting services. Thus, standardization between datasets is generally...
Preprint
Full-text available
Synthesising trait observations and knowledge across the Tree of Life remains a grand challenge for biodiversity science. Despite the well-recognised importance of traits for addressing ecological and evolutionary questions, trait-based approaches still struggle with several basic data requirements to deliver openly accessible, reproducible, and tr...
Data
Data on a series of laboratory feeding experiments with ground beetles, cursorial spiders and centipedes of different sizes as predators. Each trial contained one predator individual and varying densities of a single prey species of different body sizes.
Article
Full-text available
1.Some ecosystems show non‐linear responses to gradual changes in environmental conditions, once a threshold in conditions ‐ or critical point ‐ is passed. This can lead to wide shifts in ecosystem states, possibly with dramatic ecological and economic consequences. Such behaviors have been reported in drylands, savannas, coral reefs or shallow lak...
Preprint
Full-text available
1. Trait-based approaches are widespread throughout ecological research, offering great potential for trait data to deliver general and mechanistic conclusions. Accordingly, a wealth of trait data is available for many organism groups, but, due to a lack of standardisation, these data come in heterogeneous formats. 2. We review current initiatives...
Article
Full-text available
Grasslands belong to the ecologically most relevant habitats in cultural landscapes, but also provide high economic value when used as meadows or pastures. Land-use intensification in grasslands negatively affects plant diversity as well as arthropod communities that depend on plants as food source and habitat, with important consequences for the p...
Article
Understanding the consequences of species loss in complex ecological communities is one of the great challenges in current biodiversity research. For a long time, this topic has been addressed by traditional biodiversity experiments. Most of these approaches treat species as trait-free, taxonomic units characterizing communities only by species num...
Data
This is the code release complementing the publication of the article 'Animal diversity and ecosystem functioning in dynamic food webs' in Nature Communications. It includes - the simulation code (C) - the analytical code (R) - functions for plotting graphs (R) - code and functions for sensitivity analysis (R) Released under GPL Licence v3.0, Cop...
Data
Supplementary Figures 1-9, Supplementary Methods and Supplementary References.
Article
Full-text available
Species diversity is changing globally and locally, but the complexity of ecological communities hampers a general understanding of the consequences of animal species loss on ecosystem functioning. High animal diversity increases complementarity of herbivores but also increases feeding rates within the consumer guild. Depending on the balance of th...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystems may exhibit catastrophic shifts, i.e. abrupt and irreversible responses of ecosystem functions and services to continuous changes in external conditions. The search for early warning signs of approaching shifts has so far mainly been conducted on theoretical models assuming spatially-homogeneous external pressures (e.g. climatic). Here,...
Data
- original data incl. documentation - original simulation code - original code for statistical analysis Published under permissive MIT (code) and CC4-by (content) licenses.
Data
This repository contains the original source code for a simulation study within the CASCADE project published in Theoretical Ecology, article DOI: 10.1007/s12080-015-0289-1
Article
It is widely accepted that global warming will adversely affect ecological communities. As ecosystems are simultaneously exposed to other anthropogenic influences, it is important to address the effects of climate change in the context of many stressors. Nutrient enrichment might offset some of the energy demands that warming can exert on organisms...
Article
Full-text available
The stability of ecological communities depends strongly on quantitative characteristics of population interactions (type-II vs. type-III functional responses) and the distribution of body masses across species. Until now, these two aspects have almost exclusively been treated separately leaving a substantial gap in our general understanding of foo...
Article
The global decline in biodiversity is especially evident in higher trophic levels as predators display higher sensitivity to environmental change than organisms from lower trophic levels. This is even more alarming given the paucity of knowledge about the role of individual predator species in sustaining ecosystem functioning. The effect of predato...
Article
Full-text available
One important aspect of climate change is the increase in average temperature, which will not only have direct physiological effects on all species but also indirectly modifies abundances, interaction strengths, food-web topologies, community stability and functioning. In this theme issue, we highlight a novel pathway through which warming indirect...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change has complex structural impacts on coastal ecosystems. Global warming is linked to a widespread decline in body size, whereas increased flood frequency can amplify nutrient enrichment through enhanced run-off. Altered population body-size structure represents a disruption in top-down control, whereas eutrophication embodies a change i...
Article
Ecology Letters (2012) 15: 436–443 Understanding effects of species loss in complex food webs with multiple trophic levels is complicated by the idiosyncrasy of the predator effects on lower trophic levels: direct and indirect effects intermingle and may increase, decrease or not affect ecosystem functioning. We introduce a reductionist approach ex...
Poster
Full-text available
Applying computational methods for a dynamic concept of species interactions in food webs.

Network

Cited By
    • Friedrich Schiller University Jena
    • Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
    • Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ / German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig / Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany
    • Imperial College London
    • Leibniz Institute for the Analysis of Biodiversity Change

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This project aims at analysing insect biodiversity in 21 selected German nature reserves, in correlation with important environmental variables, identifying possible causes of its decline, exploring potentials of stakeholder participation for integrated, cross-sectoral decision-making and providing evidence-based policy recommendations for more effective biodiversity preservation. This is the first research project addressing these questions in Germany. The legal and environmental policy framework of the proposed research project is the Biodiversity Convention (CBD 1992) and its numerous decisions concretizing research demands. At the national level, our project is based on the biodiversity strategies of the Federal Government (BMUB 2007), as well as on the Federal Nature Conservation Act and the Fauna-Flora Habitat Directive (FFH-RL). www.dina-insektenforschung.de Description of special project parts: o far, there are only a few environmental-chemical studies that deal with the pesticide load in nature conservation areas caused by conventional farming methods. First results of studies on the coexistence of conventional and organic farms in Brandenburg showed that, in addition to direct contamination by drift from conventionally cultivated neighbouring fields, long-distance transport of pesticides also takes place. This work package aims at a spatial representative assessment of air pollution loads within the 21 selected nature reserves as well as in the surrounding agricultural areas. Standardized technique of bark biomonitoring and effective multi-point data collection will be applied to monitor the aerial input of a broad range of pesticides (>500 PSM) and more than 55 elements. This allows a fingerprinting of relevant pollution impacts by agriculture and other anthropogenic and natural pollution sources, e.g. N, P and other nutrients indicating the intensity of agriculture and fertilization at the sites, other elements like toxic heavy metals, S, lanthanides, serving to differentiate the influence of other industrial emission sources such as combustion, acid rain, traffic etc. Bark biomonitoring is a standardized method to measure air pollution loads integrating over greater time spans in a comparable way. To integrate volatile as well as semi-volatile and non-volatile contaminants, yearly sub-samples will be taken at the end of each season and combined to one integrated sample. Beside of direct and immediate effects, also indirect and time-delayed effects of pollution exposure to insect populations are to be regarded, too. The results of the bark biomonitoring on long-term pollution are valuable to integrate these aspects in the analysis and final assessment. Results will provide data on the complexity of pollution loads at the sites in a comparable way, allowing an empirical data-based assessment of pollution impacts for the 21 nature reserves and the surrounding landscape and classification in the three exposure categories. Hereby the standardized method enables the assessment in relation to other sites in Germany in form of the statistical data distribution being defined in previous projects. Furthermore, data are valuable for further research such as the definition of representative pollution cocktails to be used in standardized laboratory toxicity tests.