Florencia Yannelli

Florencia Yannelli
Freie Universität Berlin | FUB · Jeschke group - Ecological Novelty

Dr rer. nat.

About

24
Publications
13,423
Reads
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408
Citations
Introduction
Florencia Yannelli currently works at the Ecological Novelty group, at the Freie Universität Berlin. Her work focuses on the linkages between the aboveground plant and the belowground soil communities and how both components might work in concert enhancing alien invasive species performance. She is interested in examining the role of legacy effects following invasions on the restoration of native vegetation and the theory-based design of resistant communities for restoration.
Additional affiliations
October 2019 - present
Freie Universität Berlin
Position
  • Researcher
July 2016 - present
Stellenbosch University
Position
  • Lecturer
June 2016 - December 2018
Stellenbosch University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
September 2012 - April 2016
Technische Universität München
Field of study
  • Restoration Ecology
February 2005 - June 2011
National University of Cuyo
Field of study
  • Renewable Natural Resources Engineering

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
With the aim to identify future challenges and opportunities in vegetation science, we brought together a group of 22 early-career vegetation scientists from diverse backgrounds to perform a horizon scan. In this contribution, we present a selection of 15 topics that were ranked by participants as the most emergent and impactful for vegetation scie...
Article
Full-text available
A challenge in many restoration projects, in particular when establishing de novo communities, is the arrival and later dominance of invasive alien plants. This could potentially be avoided by designing invasion-resistant native communities. Several studies suggest achieving this by maximizing trait similarity between natives and potential invaders...
Article
Full-text available
Our ability to predict invasions has been hindered by the seemingly idiosyncratic context-dependency of individual invasions. However, we argue that robust and useful generalisations in invasion science can be made by considering “invasion syndromes” which we define as “a combination of pathways, alien species traits, and characteristics of the rec...
Article
Le Roux et al. suggest that documented increases in local plant richness in response to climate change should consider the nature of ‘new’ species. They find that species responsible for increases in richness in areas that have experienced significant disturbance and climate change are often invasive and/or weedy species.
Article
Full-text available
The Novel Weapons Hypothesis postulates that the release of allelochemicals by alien plants can inhibit the growth of evolutionary naı¨venaı¨ve native plants. On the other hand, when species share a recent evolutionary history, recognition of phytochemicals from neighboring plants can have adaptive value by providing cues to signal suitable conditi...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aims: Since its emergence in the mid-20th century, invasion biol- ogy has matured into a productive research field addressing questions of fundamen- tal and applied importance. Not only has the number of empirical studies increased through time, but also has the number of competing, overlapping and, in some cases, contradictory hypot...
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystem properties can be positively affected by plant functional diversity and compromised by invasive alien plants. We performed a community assembly study in mesocosms manipulating different functional diversity levels for native grassland plants (communities composed by 1, 2 or 3 functional groups) to test if functional dispersion could const...
Article
During the Anthropocene, humans are changing the Earth system in ways that will be detectable for millennia to come [1]. Biologically, these changes include habitat destruction, biotic homogenization, increased species invasions, and accelerated extinctions [2]. Contemporary extinction rates far surpass background rates [3], but they seem remarkabl...
Article
Full-text available
Although uncertainty is an integral part of any science, it raises doubts in public perception about scientific evidence, is exploited by denialists, and therefore potentially hinders the implementation of management actions. As a relatively young field of study, invasion science contains many uncertainties. This may explain why, despite internatio...
Article
Full-text available
Non-native plants often alter environments they invade, favouring their own performance through positive feedbacks. Plant-soil interactions represent one such mechanism, but their complexity (e.g. invader-induced changes in soil nutrients, microbial communities, etc.) makes inferences of the precise mechanisms that benefit invaders difficult. Here...
Article
Full-text available
Disturbed areas offer great opportunities for restoring native biodiversity, but they are also prone to invasion by alien plants. Following the limiting similarity hypothesis, we address the question whether or not similarity of plant functional traits helps developing seed mixtures of native communities with higher resistance to invasive species a...
Article
Full-text available
Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain biotic resistance of a recipient plant community based on reduced niche opportunities for invasive alien plant species. The limiting similarity hypothesis predicts that invasive species are less likely to establish in communities of species holding similar functional traits. Likewise, Darwin's natura...
Article
Revegetation of roadsides is an opportunity for grassland restoration, yet these habitats are prone to be colonised by invasive alien plant species (IAS). Therefore, the selection of seed mixtures for revegetation should consider potential competition with IAS present in the soil seed bank or arriving by traffic-related seed rain. We investigated w...
Thesis
Full-text available
Biological invasions are among the most important drivers of biodiversity loss, contributing to ecosystem degradation and complicating efforts to restore degraded ecosystems. A key question is whether or not we can prevent the establishment of invasive alien species (IAS) by designing resistant plant communities. In invasion ecology, most of the pr...
Article
Full-text available
Land abandonment is a major issue worldwide. In Argentina, the Monte Desert is the most arid rangeland, where the traditional conservation practices are based on successional management of areas excluded to disturbances or abandoned. Some areas subjected to this kind of management may be too degraded, and thus require active restoration. Therefore,...
Thesis
Full-text available
La erosión hídrica es una de las causas principales de degradación del suelo en todo el mundo y se ha convertido en un tema de preocupación social y ambiental significativo. Las tierras semiáridas con un uso histórico agrícola o pecuario intensivo y que ahora poseen un uso restringido como es el caso del Parque Nacional El Leoncito, pueden ser vuln...

Questions

Questions (4)
Question
I need papers that discuss the consecuences of land abandonment in terms of vegetation and erosion, specifically after two types of land use: cultivation and grazing. Any suggestions?
Question
I would like to test how dissimilar are some traits of an intruduced species with respect to an established community.

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Invasive species from the genus Acacia have been found to disrupt the soil nitrogen, carbon and phosphorus cycles, and further suggested to have allelopathic compounds, all playing a role in facilitating their invasive success. In a collaborative work, for the first part of the project we examine whether invasive Acacia species have allelopathic effects (i.e. the effect of phytotoxins disrupting the metabolism of surrounding plants) on the germination of native species as well as on other co-ocurring invasive acacias in South Africa (SA) and Spain.
Project
Invasive Australian Acacia species are a major threat to the species-rich fynbos vegetation of the Cape Floristic Region (CFR) of South Africa (Le Maitre et al. 2011). Even though the CFR is one of the most impacted biomes in the region due to the increased development and urbanization, it still remains inadequately protected and managed (Rebelo et al. 2011). In highly diverse ecosystems such as the fynbos of the CFR, the soil microbial community is closely related to the plant communities (Slabbert et al. 2010). When invasive acacias become a dominant element of the system, they thus not only change the aboveground plant community, but also their associated soil microbial communities. These changes and the associated effects on plant-soil feedbacks, which likely persist even beyond the removal of the Acacia plants (so-called legacy effects), will probably have a strong influence on the recovery of the native plant community. Hence, with this project we aim to tease apart the mechanisms of legacy effects of Acacia species on the soil microbial structure and function following restoration in the CFR. For doing so we seek to assess whether legacy effects lead to positive or negative plant-soil feedbacks and how these will impact the reestablishment success of native plants under field conditions; examine the effect these plant-soil feedbacks have on the performance of the same and other Acacia species; and finally, evaluate how changes in the microbial community will influence the competitive ability of native species, with particular attention to native legumes.