Fletcher Warren-Myers

Fletcher Warren-Myers
University of Melbourne | MSD · School of BioSciences

Doctor of Philosophy

About

23
Publications
4,204
Reads
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206
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2011 - December 2011
University of Melbourne
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Salmonid aquaculture, producing nearly 3 million tons per year, has expanded across temperate seascapes around the globe in recent decades. Cage technologies used to farm salmonids are thought to have changed in both size and location in coastal environments, yet remarkably little data exists to explain these major developments. Using satellite ima...
Article
Full-text available
Advances in tag technology now make it possible to monitor the behavior of small groups of individual fish as bioindicators of population wellbeing in commercial aquaculture settings. For example, tags may detect unusual patterns in fish heart rate, which could serve as an early indicator of whether fish health or welfare is becoming compromised. H...
Article
Structural modification of sea cages is continually changing to counter major production issues associated with commercial salmon farming. For example, snorkels and skirts are added to cages to reduce salmon lice infestations, and submerging cages can reduce salmon-lice encounter rates, minimise the effects of storms or avoid other unsuitable sea s...
Article
In the effort to increase the commercial value of urchin gonads produced via roe enhancement aquaculture, a variety of formulated feeds have been tested to increase gonad production and improve colour and taste. The addition of dried algal supplements to formulated feeds can further enhance gonad quality, but the level of improvement is highly vari...
Article
Surface‐based cages are the dominant production technology for the marine finfish aquaculture industry. However, issues such as extreme weather events, poor environmental conditions, interactions with parasites, and conflicts with other coastal users are problematic for surface‐based aquaculture. Submerged cages may reduce many of these problems an...
Article
Full-text available
A variety of tagging techniques are now available to monitor fish behaviour, physiology and their environmental experience. Tagging is frequently used in aquaculture research to monitor free-swimming individuals within farmed populations. However, for information gathered from tagged fish to be representative of farmed populations, tagging must not...
Article
Sea urchin gonads (roe) are a prized global sea food commodity, with growing demand driving the need for urchin roe enhancement aquaculture. Effective roe enhancement of urchins using formulated feeds require species‐specific optimization and an understanding of the interactions between key dietary components (e.g. protein, lipid, carbohydrate, ene...
Article
Salmon lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis are a financial and fish welfare issue for the salmon aquaculture industry. Avoiding the planktonic, mostly surface-dwelling infective stage of lice by holding salmon deep in submerged sea-cages could reduce host-parasite encounter rates, reducing the lice problem. However, submergence, or long-term lack of surf...
Article
Finding the ideal density to optimise growth, health and welfare of aquaculture species reared in cage or tank environments allows farmers to produce the best quality product per unit area. Appropriate stocking densities are well known for most major aquaculture species, but limited information exists for the developing sea urchin aquaculture indus...
Article
Full-text available
Interest in sea urchin roe enhancement aquaculture is growing due to an increased global demand for high-quality roe that is suitable for export to international markets. Yet, fine-tuning of efficient collection methods and improved growing techniques are still key bottlenecks to industry success. Urchins suitable for roe enhancement are generally...
Article
Full-text available
The use of farmed and restocked fish to supplement the worldwide human consumption of fish, recreational fishing stocks, and conservation efforts, is growing at a rapid rate. Yet, monitoring the benefits of using hatchery-raised fish for supplementation is lacking, often due to hatcheries not marking or tagging all fish prior to release, despite a...
Article
Suitable habitat for many temperate freshwater species of salmonids is predicted to dramatically decline, yet many hatcheries still release millions of juvenile salmonids into rivers and lakes annually with little or no post release monitoring. This is, in part, because marking of hatchery reared fish is often not compulsory and currently available...
Article
Full-text available
The rapid growth of aquaculture raises questions about the welfare status of mass-produced species. Sagittal otoliths are primary hearing structures in the inner ear of all teleost (bony) fishes and are normally composed of aragonite, though abnormal vaterite replacement is sometimes seen in the wild. We provide the first widespread evaluation of t...
Article
Full-text available
Farmed fish sometimes escape and enter natural environments, where they mix with wild fish populations and can have negative effects. Marking farmed fish is a prerequisite for the identification of the origin of escapees and for guiding technical investigations to determine the cause of an escape event and improve farming practices. We tested trans...
Article
Full-text available
For organisms with complex life cycles, longer time spent in the plankton by dispersing propagules can cause reduced survival, growth and fecundity, which could alter interactions between neighbours in the post-dispersal environment. We compared post-settlement performance of bryozoan Watersipora subtorquata colonies that developed from larvae of d...
Article
Full-text available
Farmed fish escape and enter the environment with subsequent effects on wild populations. Reducing escapes requires the ability to trace individuals back to the point of escape, so that escape causes can be identified and technical standards improved. Here, we tested if stable isotope otolith fingerprint marks delivered during routine vaccination c...
Article
Determining the value of restocking wild fisheries with hatchery-reared fish requires the ability to identify and quantify the survival of hatchery fish after release. However, to obtain accurate estimates of survival rates, multiple fish identification techniques are often used, making the monitoring of restocking inefficient and costly. Here we t...
Conference Paper
In fishes, the growth-mortality hypothesis has received broad acceptance as a driver of recruitment variability, with food-limitation and selective mortality resulting in the removal of slow-growing, small individuals from the population. Based on long-term monitoring in Port Phillip Bay, Australia, pink snapper, Chrysophrys auratus (Sparidae), exp...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT: Tagging or marking of fishes enables the collection of population-based information for ecological research, yet few techniques enable 100% mark detection success. We tested a new mass-marking technique: otolith marking with enriched stable isotopes delivered during vaccination. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) parr were injected in either t...
Article
Otolith marking with enriched stable isotopes via immersion is a recent method of batch marking larval fish for a range of research and industrial applications. However, current immersion times and isotope concentrations required to successfully mark an otolith limit the utility of this technique. Osmotic induction improves incorporation and reduce...
Article
Full-text available
In fishes, the growth-mortality hypothesis has received broad acceptance as a driver of recruitment variability. Recruitment is likely to be lower in years when the risk of starvation and predation in the larval stage is greater, leading to higher mortality. Juvenile snapper, Pagrus auratus (Sparidae), experience high recruitment variation in Port...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Improve (a) understanding of Victoria's wild trout fisheries, (b) engagement with stakeholders (fishers) and (c) management of wild trout fisheries.
Archived project
Discovering the extent, causes and consequences of vaterite replacement in the sagittal otoliths of farmed fish.