Fiona C. Meade

Fiona C. Meade
Uppsala University | UU · Department of Earth Sciences

BA(mod), PhD, PGCAP, FHEA

About

40
Publications
9,751
Reads
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212
Citations
Introduction
My main research interests are magmatic processes, including magma-crust interaction and magma mixing phenomena. I employ whole-rock and micro-scale (crystal-zone) radiogenic isotope data and major and trace element data to trace igneous processes. My recent research focuses on experimental petrology and crustal contamination in the North Atlantic Igneous Province, focussing on the Faroe Islands. I currently operate as a freelance geologist. See www.FionaMeade.com for more details.
Additional affiliations
November 2013 - present
Meade Scientific Services
Position
  • Consultant
Description
  • I founded Meade Scientific Services in November 2013 with the aim of using all the skills I've acquired during my career as a teacher, researcher and scientist, in a flexible freelance capacity.
August 2013 - present
Uppsala University
Position
  • Research Associate
August 2010 - August 2013
Uppsala University
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Focused on experimental petrology, modeling crustal contamination and partial melting processes in the lower and upper crust.
Education
September 2009 - August 2011
University of Glasgow
Field of study
  • Education
October 2004 - September 2008
Trinity College Dublin
Field of study
  • Geology
October 2000 - June 2004
Trinity College Dublin
Field of study
  • Geology

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
Full-text available
The origin of bimodal (mafic-felsic) rock suites is a fundamental question in volcanology. Here we use major and trace elements, high-resolution Sr, Nd and Pb isotope analyses, experimental petrology and thermodynamic modelling to investigate bimodal magmatism at the iconic Carlingford Igneous Centre, Ireland. We show that early microgranites are t...
Article
The origin of volcanism in the Canary Islands has been a matter of controversy for several decades. Discussions have hinged on whether the Canaries owe their origin to seafloor fractures associated with the Atlas Mountain range or to an underlying plume or hotspot of superheated mantle material. However, the debate has recently come to a conclusion...
Article
Full-text available
The origin and life cycle of ocean islands have been debated since the early days of Geology. In the case of the Canary archipelago, its proximity to the Atlas orogen led to initial fracture-controlled models for island genesis, while later workers cited a Miocene-Quaternary east-west age-progression to support an underlying mantle-plume. The recen...
Article
The British–Irish Palaeogene Igneous Province (BIPIP) is part of the larger North Atlantic Igneous Province and includes the lava fields of Antrim, Mull, and Skye. The Tardree Rhyolite Complex (TRC) in Northern Ireland forms an important stratigraphic unit between the Lower and Upper Basalt Formations of the Antrim Lava Group (ALG). Previous zircon...
Article
Full-text available
The composite intrusions of Drumadoon and An Cumhann crop out on the SE coast of the Isle of Arran, Scotland and form part of the larger British and Irish Palaeogene Igneous Province, a subset of the North Atlantic Igneous Province. The intrusions (shallow-level dykes and sills) comprise a central quartz–feldspar-phyric rhyolite flanked by xenocrys...
Article
Gran Canaria, like most of the Canary Islands, shows evidence for young basaltic volcanism in the form of cinder cones and valley‐hugging lava flows. These landforms were of no particular use to the aboriginal population, nor to the subsequent Spanish settlers, and young lava flows and lava fields are still referred to as ‘malpaís’ (badlands) in th...
Article
Full-text available
The published literature on the Faroe Islands Basalt Group (FIBG) contains a large number of of whole rock (bulk) chemical analyses, but there is an obvious dearth of mineral chemical data. Plagioclase is the dominant phenocryst phase in the FIBG lavas, and is widely used to help constrain magmatic processes and magma storage conditions. The presen...
Article
The origin of volcanism in the Canary Islands has been a matter of controversy for several decades. Discussions have hinged on whether the Canaries owe their origin to seafloor fractures associated with the Atlas Mountain range or to an underlying plume or hotspot of superheated mantle material. However, the debate has recently come to a conclusion...
Book
Full-text available
Leaflet compiled for Mourne Cooley Gullion Geotourism
Book
Full-text available
Leaflet compiled for Mourne Cooley Gullion Geotourism
Book
Full-text available
Leaflet compiled for Mourne Cooley Gullion Geotourism
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The origin of bimodal (mafic-felsic) volcanic suites has been a fundamental scientific question since they were first recognised over 150 years ago. Potential explanations include liquid immiscibility, deep trapping of intermediate magmas and chemical interaction with crustal rocks. We used high-resolution Sr, Nd and Pb isotope analyses, experiment...
Article
The origin and life cycle of ocean islands have been debated since the early days of Geology. In the case of the Canary archipelago, its proximity to the Atlas orogen led to initial fracture-controlled models for island genesis, while later workers cited a Miocene-Quaternary east-west age-progression to support an underlying mantle-plume. The recen...
Article
Full-text available
A new scientific paper, recently published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications, uses detailed chemical analyses of rocks from the Carlingford Igneous Centre, a large, extinct volcano in northeast Co. Louth to investigate a 160-year-old geological conundrum. The article offers a new perspective on how some of the most explosive volcanic...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Palaeogene Carlingford central complex, northeast Ireland, hosts a swarm of mostly basaltic cone-sheets with several lithological subsets (Halsall, 1974). The two most abundant sets are aphyric and highly porphyritic cone-sheets with up to 80% of cm-sized plagioclase phenocrysts. The abundance of highly porphyritic cone-sheets seems to systemat...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
During the first week of the 2011/2012 submarine eruption off El Hierro (Canary Islands), peculiar light-coloured pumiceous rocks (xeno-pumice) were found floating on the sea. The appearance of these rocks led to a potentially inappropriate response from the authorities, because the rocks were viewed as likely indicators of high-silica magma and po...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The origin of bimodal (mafic-felsic) volcanic suites has been a fundamental scientific question since they were first recognised over 150 years ago1. Potential explanations include liquid immiscibility, deep trapping of intermediate magmas and chemical interaction with crustal rockse.g.2-5. We used high-resolution Sr, Nd and Pb isotope analyses, ex...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) are among the most spectacular acts on the geological stage and are associated with large volumes of magma over short time periods. The surface expression of such activity, in turn, is controlled by the length, duration and activity of lava effusion vs. volcanic quiet periods in flood basalt fields. However, the gener...
Article
Full-text available
No abstract available.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Understanding partial melting of ancient gneiss terranes is crucial when considering crustal contamination in volcanic systems, for example, as these rocks are unlikely to melt completely at magmatic temperatures (900-1200 °C) and crustal pressures (<500 MPa). Variations in the bulk composition of the protolith, magma temperature, pressure and the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In-situ geochemical characterization of experimentally generated partial melts: modelling crustal contamination precisely Understanding partial melting of ancient gneiss terranes is crucial when considering crustal contamination in volcanic systems, as these rocks are unlikely to melt completely at magmatic temperatures (900-1200 • C) and crustal p...
Article
Full-text available
A submarine eruption started off the south coast of El Hierro, Canary Islands, on 10 October 2011 and continues at the time of this writing (February 2012). In the first days of the event, peculiar eruption products were found floating on the sea surface, drifting for long distances from the eruption site. These specimens, which have in the meantim...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies on shallow-level arcuate intrusions have identified numerous examples of horizontal mineral fabrics. These are commonly interpreted as reflecting considerable lateral flow during magma emplacement, thus querying established 'semi-vertical' ring-dyke models. We question the recent lateral emplacement model proposed for the Palaeocene...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Understanding partial melting of ancient TTG gneiss terranes is crucial when considering crustal contamination in volcanic systems, as these rocks are unlikely to melt completely at magmatic temperatures (1000-1200 °C) and crustal pressures (<500 MPa). Variations in the bulk composition of the gneiss, magma temperature, pressure (depth) and the com...
Article
Full-text available
This is the discussion manuscript. For the final peer-reviewed and published version, please see here: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/233726774_Floating_stones_off_El_Hierro_Canary_Islands_Xenoliths_of_pre-island_sedimentary_origin_in_the_early_products_of_the_October_2011_eruption . ... *** The eruption that started off the south coast...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Magmatism at the Palaeogene Carlingford Igneous Centre is represented by a major gabbro laccolith and a micro-granite ring-dyke, both of which are crosscut by a series of aphyric to highly porphyritic basaltic cone-sheets with subordinate rhyolite, basaltic-andesite and trachy-andesite components. These lithologies, plus local crust, were analysed...
Article
Full-text available
A contact zone between porphyritic microgranite of the early ring-complex of the Paleocene Slieve Gullion igneous centre and Lower Palaeozoic metasedimentary rocks of the Longford–Down inlier was exposed along a 300m section excavated during construction of the new M1 motorway. The outcrop displays a thin sliver of Longford–Down metasediment in con...
Conference Paper
The Carlingford Igneous Centre, in Eastern Ireland, is part of the British and Irish Palaeogene Igneous Province and lies within the Southern Uplands Terrane, an accretionary prism of Ordovician to Silurian greywacke sequences (the Longford-Down inlier) underlain by subducted oceanic crust [1]. The centre, representing the eroded roots of a central...
Conference Paper
The British-Irish Palaeocene Igneous Province (BPIP) is an ideal testing ground for the influence of crustal composition on ascending magmas as four major tectono-stratigraphic terranes are traversed on a transect from Skye and Rum in the North, to the Mourne Mtns, Carlingford and Slieve Gullion in the South. These crustal blocks are bounded by maj...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
A field guide to the Mourne, Carlingford and Slieve Gullion igneous centres. Funded by the European Regional Development Fund, through Mourne Cooley Gullion Geotourism.