Fiona Leach

Fiona Leach
University of Sussex · Department of Education

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47
Publications
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Introduction
Fiona Leach previously worked at the Centre for International Education, University of Sussex. She is now retired but remains academically active. Her latest publication is Reclaiming the Women of Britain's First Mission to West Africa: Three Lives Lost and Found, 2018, Leiden: Brill, 448 pages.

Publications

Publications (47)
Article
Despite several decades of feminist scholarship, the early period of overseas evangelism has remained largely untouched, allowing the myth of the mission as an all male affair to go unchallenged. The paper takes the life story of one particular missionary wife who served on the Church Missionary Society’s first African mission to illustrate the rol...
Book
This book offers the compelling story of three long forgotten women, two white and one black, who lived, worked and died on Britain's first mission to West Africa at the dawn of the nineteenth century. Taking as its starting point a cache of fifty letters from the three women, it counters the prevailing narrative that the early missionary endeavour...
Article
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The origins of modern schooling in early nineteenth-century Africa have been poorly researched. Moreover, histories of education in Africa have focused largely on the education of boys. Little attention has been paid to girls’ schooling or to the missionary women who sought to construct a new feminine Christian identity for African girls. In the ab...
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Full-text available
I am honoured to have been invited to write an introduction for this special issue of Girlhood Studies commemorating the life and work of Jackie Kirk. I first met Jackie at a conference in Washington in 1998. She subsequently spent several weeks at Sussex University in 2001 working on her doctorate on women teachers in development contexts. Later s...
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This article is based on an ESRC/DFID funded research project on Widening Participation in Higher Education in Ghana and Tanzania: Developing an Equity Scorecard (http://www.sussex.ac.uk/education/wideningparticipation). There are questions about whether widening participation in higher education is a force for democratisation or differentiation. W...
Article
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This paper draws on Anglican mission archive material to uncover the extent to which girls’ schooling in early nineteenth‐century West Africa developed as a response to male interests and perceived male needs. The founding of the colony of Sierra Leone in 1787 as a home for freed slaves followed by the arrival of Protestant missionaries in 1804 off...
Article
This paper discusses work-in-progress on the ESRC-DFID funded research project on Widening Participation in Higher Education in Ghana and Tanzania: Developing an Equity Scorecard (www.sussex.ac.uk/education/wideningparticipation). This project is examining patterns of inclusion and exclusion in higher education in two African countries with a view...
Chapter
It is now generally acknowledged that HIV prevalence rates among school-going youth are significantly lower than among those out of school, and that education reduces vulnerability to HIV infection in some way (Hargreaves and Boler 2006; Pridmore and Yates 2005; Jukes and Desai 2005). This is an especially important finding for girls, being the gro...
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This article reports on a small exploratory study of adolescent girls' experiences of sexual harassment and abuse while attending secondary school in Karnataka State, South India. In South Asia, public discussion of sexual matters, especially relating to children, is largely taboo, and the study uncovers a hidden aspect of schooling, which presents...
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This paper draws attention to the gendered nature of violence in schools. Recent recognition that schools can be violent places has tended to ignore the fact that many such acts originate in unequal and antagonistic gender relations, which are tolerated and 'normalised' by everyday school structures and processes. After examining some key concepts...
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This article explores the many ways in which male staff in a Nigerian College of Education were able to subvert policies and procedures intended to ensure equal opportunities in order to serve their own interests and in so doing to marginalise and disadvantage female colleagues. Given the overwhelming perception of women as inferior to men in Niger...
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This paper examines a number of methodological and ethical issues around research with children, arising from a recent study of the abuse of adolescent girls in schools in three African countries. The research used open-ended interviews and participatory workshops exploring visual representations of school life to uncover incidents of sexual, physi...
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This paper explores gender violence in schools in what is commonly known as the ‘developing world’ through a review of recent research written in English. Violence in the school setting has only recently emerged as a widespread and serious phenomenon in these countries, with the consequence that our knowledge and understanding of it is embryonic; m...
Article
Incl. graphs and bibl. The ten essays in this volume look at the many and complex relationships between HIV/AIDS and education. It is clear that education in an AIDS-infected world cannot be the same as that in an AIDS-free world. It is imperative to adapt educational planning and management principles, curriculum-development goals, and the provisi...
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This paper examines the role of the school, and of the peer group culture in particular, in constructing male and female identity among adolescents within the context of high levels of gender violence. It draws on a DfID-funded study into the abuse of girls in schools in three African countries (Zimbabwe, Malawi and Ghana). This study documents inc...
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Although violence by men against women in Bangladesh occurs in most cases within the home, in a larger sense it does not originate in the home nor persist only within the home. It is simply one element in a system that subordinates women through social norms that define women's place and guide their conduct. This paper uses ethnographic and structu...
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Incl. abstract and bibl. references This article describes an NGO project intended to empower scheduled caste women working in the silk-reeling industry in India through the provision of microfinance. It documents the impact that the project had on their economic and social status over a period of time and highlights the negative consequences of ex...
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This paper examines the prevalence of gender based violence in African schools, drawing on a small number of studies. It questions the suitability of the school as the location of HIV/AIDS prevention campaigns given that schools are the site of high levels of gender violence, most of it directed at girls. If adolescents, especially girls, are indee...
Article
In this paper, it is suggested that the macro-policies which the donor agencies and the development banks are currently marketing in the field of education and training would appear to contradict their stated goal of reducing gender disparities in society, including those that prevail in education. Decentralisation of educational financing and cont...
Article
Women's participation in formal education continues to be lower than that of men. This article examines a range of reasons for the persistence of this gender gap, and also why the education provided in schools has generally had little impact on women's status in society.
Article
This article reviews the extent to which the educational system has acknowledged the importance to women of the informal sector of the economy, and the extent to which it has sought to prepare them for employment or self-employment within it. It assesses the record of both formal and non-formal education in providing women with the necessary skills...
Article
This article reviews the extent to which the educational system has acknowledged the importance to women of the informal sector of the economy, and the extent to which it has sought to prepare them for employment or self-employment within it. It assesses the record of both formal and non-formal education in providing women with the necessary skills...
Article
This paper suggests that a major cause of the poor performance of institution-building projects in developing countries lies in the potential incompatibility of the development project (whether in the education sector or elsewhere) with the host institution into which it is introduced (for example, a ministry department, college or research institu...
Article
Despite the large sums spent annually by donors on the provision of project-based expertise and training, surprisingly little attention has been paid in the Technical Cooperation literature to the importance of the roles and relationships that develop between individuals on projects, and in particular their impact on project implementation. This is...
Chapter
The aim of the research described in this chapter is to explore the working relationships that develop between expatriates and Sudanese during the implementation phase of technical assistance projects.1 All the projects studied were based in the public sector in Northern Sudan and all but one (a rural development project) in institutions. The techn...
Article
Incl. bibl. We also have v.2: Education and training for the informal sector: case studies
Article
Full-text available
Some papers have been publ. in "Compare: a journal of comparative education", Vol. 35, No 4, 2005, p.351-494. Incl. bibl.

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