Fiona Kumari Campbell

Fiona Kumari Campbell
University of Dundee · School of Education & Social Work

PhD (QUT); BLS (hons) La Trobe; Adv Dip Theol (U Divinity), Cert RHD Super (Griffith), JP (Qual)

About

42
Publications
21,658
Reads
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Citations
Introduction
Fiona Kumari Campbell works at the School of Education & Social Work, University of Dundee, Scotland. She writes on disability—ableism, Sri Lankan disability, jurisprudence, and technology. Her current research relates to ableism as a research methodology, South Asian disability, biblical and Buddhist hermeneutics.HARD COPIES of WORK on Academia.edu site.
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - March 2016
University of the Sunshine Coast
Position
  • Sessional Associate Professor
January 2016 - present
University of Southern Queensland 
Position
  • Program Coordinator Human Services
June 2007 - present
University of Kelaniya
Position
  • Adjunct Professor in Disability Studies
Education
January 2002
Justice of the Peace (Qualified)
Field of study
January 1999 - January 2003
January 1990 - April 2014
University of Divinity
Field of study
  • Theology

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
This paper is an attempt to inject enthusiasm into the paradox of inaccessibility and the promotion of accessible environments through revisiting the impact of social exclusion and inaccessibility in the lives of disabled people. I undertake this rethinking of the inaccessibility question theoretically and jurisprudentially. My approach is to turn...
Article
This chapter brings together a number of disability laws and disability related provisions in review. Due to the paucity of scholarly literature concerning disability law in Sri Lanka, this chapter is tailored to both the local Sri Lankan reader and well as international readers. As such the chapter is necessarily technical in parts so as to provid...
Chapter
Full-text available
One may wonder what museums and classification systems have in common. They share a feature of working with the systematisation and reification of relics and objects. For too long there has been an almost indecent preoccupation with measuring and quantifying the existence of disabled people with the grand and commendable objective to know ‘us’ more...
Article
Typically in mainstream society, studies in metaphysics and medical sociology, disability is constructed as anti-productive, unthinkable and unintelligible. The dominant discourse in late modernity has been normalisation and more recently social inclusion. In the former, emphasis is on morphing or to spunk up impairment. Whilst the latter, although...
Article
Full-text available
Cosmopolitanism, desire and the contracting of social relationships are enduring themes in both philosophy and social theory. In this paper I seek to explore these themes in order to ascertain what they might mean to disabled people and the ethos of ableism more generally. Modern Westernized life has since the Industrial Revolution been sited in ci...
Article
Examining what the study of disability tells us about the production, operation and maintenance of ableism, this ambitious study explores the ways 'abled-ness' is understood, providing new directions in research on 'aberrancy' and its focus on a normative ethos. Reconfiguring and challenging the disability studies perspective, this book extends its...
Article
Full-text available
Does it matter who teaches disability studies, whether that teacher has a disability or not? Maybe this might strike the reader as a peculiar question – to focus on the teacher’s body or knowledge standpoint. There are certain theoretical and ontological implications in asking such questions. This article is an attempt to theorise about the way the...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract The biomedicalist conceptualization of disablement as a personal medical tragedy has been criticized by disability studies scholars for discounting the difference between disability and impairment and the ways disability is produced by socio-environmental factors. This paper discusses prospects for partnerships between disability studies t...
Chapter
Aristotle once described women as mutilated males. Pregnancy has been suggested as a class of disability under law and premenstrual ‘syndrome’ has been lauded as a defence to murder. This chapter continues in the discussion of how law imagines disability (the disabled existence) and negotiates some of the torturous questions related to ontology and...
Chapter
Increasingly law mediates medico-technological formulations of impairment. Many years ago it was hard to imagine a scenario where disabled people could be pressured into obtaining surgical, prosthetic or pharmacological interventions in order to avail themselves of the identity of the ‘disabled person’, thus enabling them to access social services...
Chapter
This chapter is about the power of rhetoric and representation, not only of marked bodies known to the hearing world as ‘the Deaf,’1 but about an artefact branded as a Cochlear Implant (CI). It is also a story — a story about the incubation and birth of an artefact that its designers argue creates or mimics ‘sound’. Narratives of persuasion enabled...
Chapter
‘The hegemonic location of biomedicalism among institutional formations has meant our present capacity to experience the body directly, or theorize it indirectly, [has become] extricably medicalized’ (Frank, 1990, p. 136). Freidson (1970) points out that this state of hegemonic biomedicalism has meant that doctors have had a sanctioned monopoly to...
Chapter
Impairment, in particular those that are multiple and of a severe nature, requires extensive resources in order for the person concerned (and often, their families) to have full equalisation of opportunities and a reasonable quality of life. Support and financial assistance provided by governments though welfare systems are becoming less available...
Chapter
Today ambivalent survivors are charged with passing on knowledge and memories of how life was so that ‘we’ can dream of another way to be. Thus stories of disability and abledness are like maps providing safety so the traveller will not inadvertently turn off the road, go astray or navigate haphazardly into areas unknown or secured for the sole use...
Chapter
Does it matter who teaches disability studies, whether that teacher has a disability or not? Maybe this might strike the reader as a peculiar question — to focus on the teacher’s body or knowledge standpoint. There are certain theoretical and ontological implications in asking such questions. This chapter is an attempt to theorise about the way the...
Chapter
Technologies in the form of sentiency, objects, spatialisation not only enact the demarcations between nature and culture, human and alterate; technologies mediate the conditions of ableism remediating the ways the abled body and mentality can be known. This chapter implores the reader to think more deeply about technologies and disability. Althoug...
Chapter
Mentalities that shatter the illusion of the monster are particularly under fire as well as those scholars that have the audacity to propose the desirability of disability. Following the insights and shortcomings of postmodernist theorists, Elizabeth Grosz (1996) challenges researchers to raise the study of freakery beyond being an object of prurie...
Chapter
Feminist Rosemary Tong (1999) long ago alluded to the profound possibilities of using critical disability studies theory to re-comprehend and re-spatialise the landscape of thinking about race and gender as sites of signification. This Chapter presents a preliminary conversation in the emergent field of studies in ableism and desires to not only pr...
Chapter
Although there are many debates in disability studies and the disability services fields, most people would agree with the proposition that disabled people1 experience various degrees of subordinated and diminished lives through economic, social, legal, religious and cultural discrimination. These problems were recently formally recognised by the U...
Article
Critical disability studies have shown that disability has been geographically and culturally defined and regulated by Western Governments. Thus, disability has history and context (Campbell 2008; Thomson 1997). This paper focuses on the impact these processes may have on people with disability in Sri Lanka. An underlying dilemma presented here con...
Article
Full-text available
This paper is an attempt to theorize about the way disabled people live with ableism, in particular internalized ableism. Typically literature within disability studies has concentrated on the practices and production of disablism, examining attitudes and barriers that contribute to the subordination of people with disabilities in society. My explo...
Article
The major impetus for law and social policy reform around disability concerns in Sri Lanka has resulted from pressure by external forces outside of the country and to a lesser extent, advocacy of a fledgling homegrown disability rights movement. In 1996 the Sri Lankan Parliament passed three significant pieces of legislation: the Human Rights Commi...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, a number of common law jurisdictions in North America and Australia have delivered judgments which, among other things, have challenged traditional formulations of impairment and legal renderings of disablement as existing independent of various technologies. In tandem with these legal re-writes, some neo-conservative legal writers...
Article
Full-text available
Disability is a representational system and its denotation is a result of how communities make sense of and mark corporeal differences. In this paper I argue that the UN norm standard setting, a form of geodisability knowledge, determines the kinds of bodies known as disabled and acts as a technology of disability governmentality. The institutional...
Article
Full-text available
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Questions

Question (1)
Question
what I am interested in is the application of theoretical work in the development of research methods, I.e to operationalise the theory and show its cogent value.

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