Filippa Fransner

Filippa Fransner
University of Bergen | UiB · Geophysical Institute

PhD
Predicting Barents Sea phytoplankton.

About

26
Publications
3,906
Reads
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195
Citations
Introduction
My research focuses on marine carbon cycling, and I'm mainly working with coupled physical-biogeochemical modelling. I’m currently employed as a PostDoc within the Nansen Legacy project (https://arvenetternansen.com/), working on biogeochemical predicitons of the Barents Sea (and the Arctic, North Atlantic).
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - present
University of Bergen
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2018 - June 2018
Stockholm University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2012 - March 2018
Stockholm University
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 2012 - March 2018
Stockholm University
Field of study
  • Atmospheric Sciences and Oceanography
September 2011 - June 2012
University Joseph Fourier - Grenoble 1
Field of study
  • Environmental Fluid Mechanics
September 2006 - June 2011
University of Gothenburg
Field of study
  • Physical Oceanography

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Numerical models of ecological systems are increasingly used to address complex environmental and resource management questions. One challenge for scientists, managers, and stakeholders is to appraise how well suited these models are to answer questions of scientific or societal relevance, that is, to perform, communicate, or access transparent eva...
Preprint
The Atlantic Niño is a major tropical interannual climate variability mode of the sea surface temperature (SST) occurring during boreal summer that shares many similarities with the tropical Pacific El Niño. Although the tropical Atlantic is an important source of CO2 to the atmosphere, the impact of Atlantic Niño on the sea-air CO2 exchange is not...
Article
Full-text available
The Norwegian Climate Prediction Model version 1 (NorCPM1) is a new research tool for performing climate reanalyses and seasonal-to-decadal climate predictions. It combines the Norwegian Earth System Model version 1 (NorESM1) – which features interactive aerosol–cloud schemes and an isopycnic-coordinate ocean component with biogeochemistry – with a...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Norwegian Climate Prediction Model version 1 (NorCPM1) is a new research tool for performing climate reanalyses and seasonal-to-decadal climate predictions. It combines the Norwegian Earth System Model version 1 (NorESM1) – which features interactive aerosol-cloud schemes and an isopycnic-coordinate ocean component with biogeochemistry – with a...
Article
Full-text available
Inter-annual to decadal variability in the strength of the land and ocean carbon sinks impede accurate predictions of year-to-year atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) growth rate. Such information is crucial to verify the effectiveness of fossil fuel emissions reduction measures. Using a multi-model framework comprising prediction systems initialized...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The second Nansen Legacy workshop on best practices for ecological model evaluation, chaired by Benjamin Planque (IMR) was held at the University of Oslo on the 23-25th September 2019. The objective of the workshop was to develop a protocol for describing the evaluation of ecological models.
Article
Full-text available
The Nansen Legacy workshop on best practices for ecological model evaluation, chaired by Benjamin Planque (IMR) was held in Tromsø on the 6-7th November 2018. The objective of the workshop was to develop recommendations for best practice in evaluation of the performance of food-web simulation models (deliverable 4-4.1.1 of the Nansen Legacy project...
Preprint
Full-text available
Being windows to the deep ocean, the Nordic Seas play an important role in transferring anthropogenic carbon, and thus ocean acidification, to the abyss. Due to its location in high latitudes, it is further more sensitive to acidification compared with many other oceanic regions. Here we make a detailed investigation of the acidification of the Nor...
Article
Full-text available
The ocean's ability to take up and store CO2 is a key factor for understanding past and future climate variability. However, qualitative and quantitative understanding of surface‐to‐interior pathways, and how the ocean circulation affects the CO2 uptake, is limited. Consequently, how changes in ocean circulation may influence carbon uptake and stor...
Article
Full-text available
Predictions of ocean biogeochemistry, such as primary productivity and CO2 uptake, would help to understand the changing marine environment and the global climate. There is an emerging number of studies where initialization of ocean physics has led to successful predictions of ocean biogeochemistry. It is, however, unclear how much these prediction...
Article
Satellite observations and output from a high resolution ocean model are used to investigate how the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico affects the Gulf Stream transport through Florida Straits. We find that the expansion (contraction) of the Loop Current leads to lower (higher) transports through the Straits of Florida. The associated surface velo...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal seas receive large amounts of terrestrially derived organic carbon (OC). The fate of this carbon, and its impact on the marine environment, is however poorly understood. Here we combine underway CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) measurements with coupled 3-D hydrodynamical–biogeochemical modelling to investigate whether remineralization of terres...
Article
Full-text available
We present Nemo-Nordic, a Baltic and North Sea model based on the NEMO ocean engine. Surrounded by highly industrialized countries, the Baltic and North seas and their assets associated with shipping, fishing and tourism are vulnerable to anthropogenic pressure and climate change. Ocean models providing reliable forecasts and enabling climatic stud...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal seas receive large amounts of terrestrially derived organic carbon (OC). The fate of this carbon, and its impact on the marine environment, is however poorly understood. Here we combine underway CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) measurements with coupled 3D hydrodynamical-biogeochemical modelling to investigate whether remineralization of terrest...
Article
Full-text available
We present Nemo-Nordic, a Baltic & North Sea model based on the NEMO ocean engine. Surrounded by highly industrialised countries, the Baltic and North seas, and their assets associated with shipping, fishing and tourism; are vulnerable to anthropogenic pressure and climate change. Ocean models providing reliable forecasts, and enabling climatic stu...
Article
Full-text available
High inputs of nutrients and organic matter make coastal seas places of intense air-sea CO2 exchange. Due to their complexity, the role of coastal seas in the global air-sea CO2 exchange is, however, still uncertain. Here we investigate the role of phytoplankton stoichiometric flexibility and extracellular DOC production for the seasonal nutrient a...
Article
Full-text available
The fate of terrestrial organic matter brought to the coastal seas by rivers and its role in the global carbon cycle are still not very well known. Here the degradation rate of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOCter) is studied in the Baltic Sea, a subarctic semienclosed sea, by releasing it as a tracer in a 3-D circulation model and applying...
Article
Full-text available
Surface western boundary currents (WBCs) like the Gulf Stream, the Kuroshio or the Agulhas Current are among the strongest ocean currents. They account for a large fraction of the eastern branch of horizontal ocean gyres. In the North Atlantic the Gulf Stream also accounts for a large part of the northward branch of the meridional overturning circu...
Article
Full-text available
We quantified horizontal transport patterns and the net exchange of nutrients between shallow regions and the open sea in the Baltic proper. A coupled biogeochemical-physical circulation model was used for transient simulations 1961-2100. The model was driven by regional downscaling of the IPCC climate change scenario A1B from two global General Ci...

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Project (1)
Project
Will European winters be increasingly mild and wet in the coming years? Will there be more extreme precipitation? Will climatic conditions be beneficial for Norwegian fisheries and hydroelectric power production? Such questions of large societal importance are at the heart of the emerging scientific field of climate prediction. Yet we may know more about global warming in a 100-year perspective than how climate in Norway will be in a decade. The Bjerknes Climate Prediction Unit (Bjerknes CPU) aims to bridge this gap between weather forecasting and long-term climate change projections, to develop skillful climate predictions. The prediction centre will capitalise on promising initial results from a team of world-class scientists at the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research – model developers, observationalists, theoreticians, and forecasters – to develop the World’s most skillful prediction system for northern climate. Our empirically based predictions corroborate the great potential to forecast Norwegian surface temperature and Arctic sea ice extent up to a decade in advance.