Filipe Lisboa

Filipe Lisboa
European Maritime Safety Agency · Maritime Surveillance

PhD candidate - Climate Change & Oceanography
Project Officer for Earth Observation Services at the European Maritime Safety Agency

About

13
Publications
2,895
Reads
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89
Citations
Introduction
Phytoplankton in the World Ocean is responsible for roughly half of the atmospheric carbon dioxide uptake. Depending on the type of organisms, they can either counter-balance or enhance a climate in change. Studying phytoplankton ecology and phenology is, therefore, of the utmost importance for the understanding of future climate variations. My research focuses on regions where changes are occurring faster, mostly related to earlier ice-melt and other geophysical seasonal variations.
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - present
European Maritime Safety Agency
Position
  • Project Officer for Earth Observation Services
March 2017 - September 2020
University of Lisbon
Position
  • PhD Student
March 2016 - March 2017
University of Lisbon
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 2009 - September 2012
University of Lisbon
Field of study
  • Physics Engineering - Earth & Space Sciences
September 2004 - September 2008
University of Lisbon
Field of study
  • Physics - Astronomy & Astrophysics

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Full-text available
Monitoring temporal changes in phytoplankton dynamics in high latitude lakes is particularly timely for understanding the impacts of warming on aquatic ecosystems. In this study, we analyzed 33-years of high resolution (30 m) Landsat (LT) data for reconstructing seasonal patterns of chlorophyll a (chl a) concentration in four lakes across Finland,...
Article
Full-text available
Monitoring lakes in high-latitude areas can provide a better understanding of freshwater systems sensitivity and accrete knowledge on climate change impacts. Phytoplankton are sensitive to various conditions: warmer temperatures, earlier ice-melt and changing nutrient sources. While satellite imagery can monitor phytoplankton biomass using chloroph...
Article
Despite the progress in sustainable development strategies, the role of the Amazon rainforest as a carbon sink faces increasing disturbances that may have a critical impact on global climate. Understanding the vulnerability of the Amazon rainforest to climate change is a major challenge, considering the complex interaction between human and natural...
Article
Full-text available
Tsunamis occur quite frequently following large magnitude earthquakes along the Chilean coast. Most of these earthquakes occur along the Peru–Chile Trench, one of the most seismically active subduction zones of the world. This study aims to understand better the characteristics of the tsunamis triggered along the Peru–Chile Trench. We investigate t...
Preprint
Full-text available
Monitoring lakes in high-latitude areas can provide a better understanding of freshwater systems sensitivity and accrete knowledge on climate change impacts. Phytoplankton are sensitive to various conditions: warmer temperatures, earlier ice-melt and changing nutrient sources. Satellite imagery can monitor algae biomass over large areas. The detect...
Chapter
Tsunamis occur quite frequently following large magnitude earthquakes along the Chilean coast. Most of these earthquakes occur along the Peru–Chile Trench, one of the most seismically active subduction zones of the world. This study aims to understand better the characteristics of the tsunamis triggered along the Peru–Chile Trench. We investigate t...
Article
Full-text available
The M∼8.3–8.4 25 November 1941 was one of the largest submarine strike-slip earthquakes ever recorded in the Northeast (NE) Atlantic basin. This event occurred along the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary between the Azores and the Strait of Gibraltar. After the earthquake, the tide stations in the NE Atlantic recorded a small tsunami with maximum amplit...
Research
Full-text available
The three-dimensional model of science, a philosophical approach to the making of modern knowledge and the role of imagination within.
Article
Full-text available
The M~8.3–8.4 25th November 1941 was one of the largest submarine strike-slip earthquakes ever recorded in the North East (NE) Atlantic basin. This event occurred along the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary between the Azores and the Strait of Gibraltar. After the earthquake, the tide stations in the NE Atlantic recorded a small tsunami with maximum amp...
Poster
Full-text available
ABSTRACT In this study we analyze the tsunami recorded in the North Atlantic following the 25 November 1941 earthquake. The earthquake with a magnitude of 8.3, located on the Gloria Fault, was one of the largest strike slip events recorded. The Gloria fault is a 500 km long scarp in the North Atlantic Ocean between 19W and 24W known to be a segment...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Many fundamental aspects of the Uranian system remain unknown or poorly constrained as no in-depth study of this system has been carried out thus far. Our knowledge of Uranus relies mainly on the Voyager 2 flybys in 1986, as well as remote sensing from Earth orbit by the Hubble Space Telescope. Studying the Uranian system would allow a better under...
Poster
Full-text available
Many fundamental aspects of the Uranian system remain unknown or poorly constrained as no in-depth study of this system has been carried out thus far. Our knowledge of Uranus relies mainly on the Voyager 2 flybys in 1986, as well as remote sensing from Earth orbit by the Hubble Space Telescope. Studying the Uranian system would allow a better under...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
I have been exploring data in the Agean sea from MODIS product normalized fluorescence line-height (nFLH).
In many control areas, I have noticed a strange pattern on the fluorescence line-height values. Does anyone know if this is due to a problem in the sensor?
Question
I would like to produce the sort of plot with latitude-wise averages for a raster in ArcMap as in Petr Lukes et al 2016.
How can I do this?
Thanks a bunch,
Filipe

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Archived project
The ultimate goal of ASTARTE is to reach a higher level of tsunami resilience in the NEAM (North East Atlantic & Mediterranean) region, to improve preparedness of coastal populations, and, ultimately, to save lives and assets. The main objectives are: Assessing long term recurrence of tsunamis Improving the identification of tsunami generation mechanisms Developing new cost-effective computational tools for hazard assessment Ameliorate the understanding of tsunami interactions with coastal structures Enhance tsunami detection capabilities, forecast and early warning skills in the NEAM region Establishing new approaches to quantify vulnerability and risk and to identify the key components of tsunami resilience and their implementation in the NEAM region