Filipe De Vadder

Filipe De Vadder
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon | IGFL · Functional genomics of host/intestinal bacteria interactions

Research Associate

About

18
Publications
10,066
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
5,854
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2020 - present
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • The gut microbiota as a master regulator of intestinal physiology in the context of malnutrition
January 2019 - September 2020
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • The gut microbiota as a master regulator of the development of the central and peripheral nervous systems in the context of malnutrition François Leulier's lab
January 2017 - December 2018
Cancer Research Center of Lyon
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
September 2011 - August 2014
Claude Bernard University Lyon 1
Field of study
  • Neurobiology and Nutrition
September 2008 - June 2011
September 2007 - June 2008

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Full-text available
Mus musculus is the classic mammalian model for biomedical research. Despite global efforts to standardize breeding and experimental procedures, the undefined composition and interindividual diversity of the microbiota of laboratory mice remains a limitation. In an attempt to standardize the gut microbiome in preclinical mouse studies, here we repo...
Article
The worrying number of children suffering from undernutrition and consequent stunting worldwide makes the understanding of the relationship between nutritional status and postnatal growth crucial. Moreover, it is now well established that undernourished children harbor an altered microbiota, correlating with impaired growth. In this review, we desc...
Article
Full-text available
The gut microbiota is now recognized as a major contributor to the host’s nutrition, metabolism, immunity, and neurological functions. Imbalanced microbiota (ie, dysbiosis) is linked to undernutrition-induced stunting, inflammatory and metabolic diseases, and cancers. Skeletal muscle also takes part in the interorgan crosstalk regulating substrate...
Article
The gastrointestinal tract harbors an intrinsic neuronal network, the enteric nervous system (ENS). The ENS controls motility, fluid homeostasis, and blood flow, but also interacts with other components of the intestine such as epithelial and immune cells. Recent studies indicate that gut microbiota diversification, which occurs alongside postnatal...
Preprint
Full-text available
Mus musculus is the classic mammalian model for biomedical research. Despite global efforts in standardizing breeding and experimental procedures, the undefined nature and inter-individual diversity of laboratory mouse microbiota remains a limitation. In an attempt to standardize preclinical studies, we have developed a simplified mouse microbiota...
Article
Full-text available
The enteric nervous system (ENS) is crucial for essential gastrointestinal physiologic functions such as motility, fluid secretion, and blood flow. The gut is colonized by trillions of bacteria that regulate host production of several signaling molecules including serotonin (5-HT) and other hormones and neurotransmitters. Approximately 90% of 5-HT...
Article
Full-text available
In the context of the obesity epidemic, dietary fibers that are found essentially in fruit and vegetables attract more and more attention, since they exert numerous metabolic benefits resulting in the moderation of body weight. Short-chain fatty acids, such as propionate and butyrate, produced through their fermentation by the intestinal microbiota...
Article
Beneficial effects of dietary fiber on glucose and energy homeostasis have long been described, focusing mostly on the production of short-chain fatty acids by the gut commensal bacteria. However, bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber also produces large amounts of succinate and, to date, no study has focused on the role of succinate on host meta...
Article
A compelling set of links between the composition of the gut microbiota, the host diet, and host physiology has emerged. Do these links reflect cause-and-effect relationships, and what might be their mechanistic basis? A growing body of work implicates microbially produced metabolites as crucial executors of diet-based microbial influence on the ho...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Insulin-like peptide 5 (INSL5) is a recently identified gut hormone that is produced predominantly by L-cells in the colon, but its function is unclear. We have previously shown that colonic expression of the gene for the L-cell hormone GLP-1 is high in mice that lack a microbiota and thus have energy-deprived colonocytes. Our aim was t...
Article
The gut microbiota plays an important role in human health by interacting with host diet, but there is substantial inter-individual variation in the response to diet. Here we compared the gut microbiota composition of healthy subjects who exhibited improved glucose metabolism following 3-day consumption of barley kernel-based bread (BKB) with those...
Article
Intestinal gluconeogenesis (IGN) promotes metabolic benefits through activation of a gut-brain neural axis. However, the local mediator activating gluconeogenic genes in the enterocytes remains unknown. We show that (i) vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) signaling through VPAC1 receptor activates the intestinal glucose-6-phosphatase gene in vivo,...
Article
To evaluate the role of bile routing modification on the beneficial effects of gastric bypass surgery on glucose and energy metabolism. Gastric bypass surgery (GBP) promotes early improvements in glucose and energy homeostasis in obese diabetic patients. A suggested mechanism associates a decrease in hepatic glucose production to an enhanced intest...
Article
Soluble dietary fibers promote metabolic benefits on body weight and glucose control, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Recent evidence indicates that intestinal gluconeogenesis (IGN) has beneficial effects on glucose and energy homeostasis. Here, we show that the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) propionate and butyrate, which are gen...
Article
The detection of glucose in the hepatoportal area is a simple but crucial peripheral cue initiating a nervous signal that ultimately leads to a wide array of metabolic and behavioural responses, such as decreased food intake, tighter control of glucose homeostasis, or appearance of food preference. This signal has been suggested to mediate the effe...
Article
Intestinal gluconeogenesis is involved in the control of food intake. We show that mu-opioid receptors (MORs) present in nerves in the portal vein walls respond to peptides to regulate a gut-brain neural circuit that controls intestinal gluconeogenesis and satiety. In vitro, peptides and protein digests behave as MOR antagonists in competition expe...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
Hi everyone,
For my neurogenesis project, I'd like to inject young pups (P14) with EdU for a long-term chase (P56). So far, my idea was to perform two days of pulse with 2 injections per day (P14 and P15) with a dose of 100 mg/kg per injection. Given how small the pups are at that time, it roughly corresponds to 50 - 60 µL of a solution of 10 mg/mL EdU. However, I'd like to know how to prepare such a solution. I've read protocols where EdU is first dissolved at 200 mg/mL in DMSO, then diluted in 1X PBS to 10 mg/mL. I am however worried that a 5% DMSO solution might be toxic for young pups. Has anyone ever injected young pups with EdU? Thanks for your help and answers!
Question
Hi,
I would like to study serotonin secretion in vitro. I know that most studies use BON cells, but these cells are pancreatic-derived and I would like to study gut serotonin.
I recently read several articles about KRJ-I cells (see Siddique et al., Neuroendocrinology, 2009) for differences between the two cell lines.
However, I have not been able to find any practical detail about these cells: where to purchase them, what culture media should be used...
If any of you has used these cells, I would appreciate your help.

Network

Cited By