Filipe R. Ceia

Filipe R. Ceia
University of Coimbra | UC · Department of Life Sciences

PhD in Marine Ecology
PhD Researcher at Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre

About

105
Publications
28,875
Reads
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1,237
Citations
Citations since 2016
74 Research Items
1098 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
Introduction
I am interested in understanding how marine taxa from upper and mid-trophic levels respond to environmental stressors, climate change, fisheries, and resources availability. More recently, I have also focused on contaminants (metals and plastics) as potential environmental stressors in marine organisms. Overall, my focus is to contribute to important milestones in the conservation and investigation of marine wildlife.
Additional affiliations
December 2018 - present
Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre (MARE)
Position
  • Researcher
April 2014 - December 2018
Marine and Environmental Research Centre (MARE)
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2007 - January 2010
Institute of Marine Research (IMAR-CIC)
Position
  • Master's Student
Education
February 2010 - December 2013
University of Coimbra
Field of study
  • Biosciences – Marine Ecology
September 2003 - February 2008
University of Algarve
Field of study
  • Environment Conservation and Management
September 1996 - December 2002
University of Algarve
Field of study
  • Marine and Fishing Biology

Publications

Publications (105)
Article
Metal pollution is currently a major issue in marine ecosystems, as organisms, and particularly seabirds, are exposed and accumulating increased levels from several anthropogenic sources. A set of 13 metals were quantified in two gull species breeding in sympatry, and in two distinct colonies separated by ca. 400 km. Oxidative stress was measured,...
Article
Multidisciplinary approaches are essential to diligently assess environmental health status of ecosystems. In this study, year-round chemical elements' exposure and impacts were assessed on the wide-ranging Cory's shearwater Calonectris borealis breeding in Berlenga Island, offshore Portugal, North Atlantic Ocean. The aim was to identify potential...
Article
Ocean circulation connects geographically distinct ecosystems across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales via exchanges of physical and biogeochemical properties. Remote oceanographic processes can be especially important for ecosystems in the Southern Ocean, where the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) transports properties across ocean ba...
Article
The assessment of contaminant exposure in marine organisms often focuses on the most toxic chemical elements from upper trophic level species. Information on mid-trophic level species and particularly on potentially less harmful elements is lacking. Additionally, microplastics have been considered emergent contaminants in aquatic environments which...
Article
Full-text available
Studies on sex-specific segregation in foraging behaviour and trophic niche have been focussed on large and dimorphic seabirds, with less information on small monomorphic species. Here, we used mini-GPS loggers, habitat suitability models, and stable isotopes to assess sex differences in the foraging movements, spatial distribution, and trophic eco...
Article
Full-text available
Chemical pollution is a major threat to marine ecosystems, and top predators such as most shark species are extremely vulnerable to being exposed and accumulating contaminants such as metals and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). This work aimed to study the degree, composition, and the sources of contamination in the blue shark (Prionace glauca...
Article
Full-text available
Foraging spatial segregation is frequent in central-place foragers during the breeding season, but very few studies have investigated foraging spatial segregation between adjacent sub-colonies. Here, we assessed for within-colony differences in the at-sea distribution, habitat use, trophic ecology and chick growth data of two Calonectris colonies d...
Article
The moon cycle has long been recognized as a driving factor of animals' behavioural patterns. However, its influence on seabirds' nocturnal behaviour remains poorly understood. Using a long-term GPS tracking dataset from Cory's and Cape Verde shearwaters (Calonectris borealis and Calonectris edwardsii, respectively) in the Berlengas, Azores, Madeir...
Preprint
Full-text available
Studies on sex-specific segregation in foraging and trophic niche have been focused on large and dimorphic seabirds, with less information on small monomorphic species. Here, we used mini-GPS loggers, habitat suitability models, and stable isotopes to assess the foraging movements, at-sea spatial distribution, and trophic ecology of male and female...
Article
Full-text available
Under the climate change context, warming Southern Ocean waters may allow mercury (Hg) to become more bioavailable to the Antarctic marine food web (i.e., ice-stored Hg release and higher methylation rates by microorganisms), whose biomagnification processes are poorly documented. Biomagnification of Hg in the food web of the Antarctic Peninsula, o...
Poster
Full-text available
The use of plastics has been increasing dramatically in the last decades, and consequently plastics and microplastics have been considered emergent contaminants in aquatic environments. The occurrence of microplastics has been reported in several marine species worldwide, however species from mid-trophic chains have not been extensively studied. Th...
Presentation
Multidisciplinary approaches are essential to diligently assess environmental health status of ecosystems. In this study, year-round chemical elements’ exposure and impacts were assessed on the wide-ranging Cory’s shearwater Calonectris borealis breeding in Berlenga Island, offshore Portugal, North Atlantic Ocean. The aim was to identify potential...
Article
Full-text available
For top consumers in marine environments, trophic discrimination factors (∆¹³C and ∆¹⁵N) between food and consumers’ tissues are expected to be similar among related species. However, few studies conducted in the laboratory indicate a large variability among species, which should be potentially higher in free-ranging animals. Here, we test for diff...
Article
Full-text available
The conservation of migratory marine species, including pelagic seabirds, is challenging because their movements span vast distances frequently beyond national jurisdictions. Here, we aim to identify important aggregations of seabirds in the North Atlantic to inform ongoing regional conservation efforts. Using tracking, phenology, and population da...
Article
Cephalopods play a major role in marine ecosystems, yet very little is known about the dynamics of their habitat use and trophic ecology across the stages of their life cycle, particularly in the Southern Ocean. Here, we used stable isotope analyses of δ13C (a proxy for foraging habitat) and δ15N (a proxy for trophic position) to investigate the ha...
Article
Biomagnification of mercury (Hg) in the Scotia Sea food web of the Southern Ocean was examined using the stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ¹⁵N) and carbon (δ¹³C) as proxies for trophic level and feeding habitat, respectively. Total Hg and stable isotopes were measured in samples of particulate organic matter (POM), zooplankton, squid, myctophid f...
Article
Within the same population, nesting green turtles (Chelonia mydas) might exploit different niches by exhibiting polymorphic foraging strategies and/or inhabiting geographically distinct foraging areas. This is crucial information for the conservation of this species. Here, we used stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) to test fo...
Article
Full-text available
Within the same population, nesting green turtles (Chelonia mydas) might exploit different niches by exhibiting polymorphic foraging strategies and/or inhabiting geographically distinct foraging areas. This is crucial information for the conservation of this species. Here, we used stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) to test fo...
Article
Fisheries have impacted seabird populations worldwide, either via bycatch mortality or resource depletion. Understanding the overlap between seabird distributions and fisheries is an important element for bycatch risk assessment, though the drivers of variation in seabird–fishery overlap are not well understood for some seabird populations. Here, w...
Article
Full-text available
In the Southern Ocean and adjacent waters, early stages of cephalopods play an important role in food webs as prey to top predators, but few is known regarding their biology and availability. Snares Penguin, Eudyptes robustus, is a top predator endemic to Snares Islands (New Zealand) that feed on cephalopods. As historical data on diet are rare for...
Article
Full-text available
Trophic niche and diet comparisons among closely sympatric marine species are important to understand complex food webs, particularly in regions most affected by climate change. Using stable isotope analyses, all ontogenetic stages of three sympatric species of Arctic cephalopods (genus Rossia) were studied to assess inter- and intraspecific compet...
Article
Gulls are highly opportunistic seabirds, and the exploitation of fishery discards led to many population increases worldwide. We investigated the importance of fish in the diet of yellow-legged and Audouin’s gulls and assessed the influence of fishery discards in their feeding ecology. We collected pellets in four islands along the western Iberian...
Article
Pelagic seabirds exhibit plasticity in foraging characteristics in relation to oceanographic conditions. This should be particularly relevant in tropical marine environments where food resources are naturally more unpredictable. We studied how inter-annual variations (2013-2018) in tropical oceanographic conditions (driver of oceanic productivity)...
Article
Full-text available
Long-term studies of pelagic nekton in the Southern ocean and their responses to ongoing environmental change are rare. Using stable isotope ratios measured in squid beaks recovered from diet samples of wandering albatrosses Diomedea exulans, we assessed decadal variation (from 1976 to 2016) in the habitat (δ 13C) and trophic level (δ 15N) of five...
Article
Pelagic seabird populations have declined strongly worldwide. In the North Atlantic there was a huge reduction in seabird populations following the European colonization of the Azores, Madeira and Canary archipelagos but information on seabird status and distribution for the subtropical region of Cabo Verde is scarce, unavailable or dispersed in gr...
Article
Full-text available
Oceans are extremely dynamic environments, which poses challenges for top-predators such as seabirds to find food resources. Yet, seabirds evolved sensorial abilities (olfactory senses) along with complex behaviours (social information transfer through local enhancement) to improve foraging efficiency. Using the Cory’s shearwater (Calonectris borea...
Article
Full-text available
Climate projections predict increases in the frequency and severity of extreme climate events over the next decades. Hence, phases of extreme climatic indices are emerging as one of the most dangerous effects of climate change, though their impacts on wildlife populations are still poorly understood. Here, we studied the foraging behaviour, body co...
Poster
Full-text available
Here, we assess metal contamination in two gull species breeding in sympatry, and in two distinct colonies separated by ca 400 km and relate their metal concentrations with trophic ecology and oxidative stress
Poster
Full-text available
This study aims to access the environmental health of mid-trophic fishes from different geographic areas and seasons in the northeast Atlantic, emphasising on mercury contamination, and relate contamination with trophic ecology and stress responses.
Poster
Full-text available
Assess inter specific differences in oxidative stress of Yellow legged and Audouin’s gulls related with their ecological niches
Article
Full-text available
Sexual segregation in trophic ecology is widespread among sexually dimorphic marine vertebrates. The degree of such segregation can change throughout the annual cycle, however, year-round data on seabird inter-sexual differences is scarce. Here we investigated sexual trophic segregation in yellow-legged gulls Larus michahellis evaluating two hypoth...
Article
Full-text available
Vampyroteuthis infernalis Chun, 1903, is a widely distributed deepwater cephalopod with unique morphology and phylogenetic position. We assessed its habitat and trophic ecology on a global scale via stable isotope analyses of a unique collection of beaks from 104 specimens from the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. Cephalopods typically are acti...
Article
Rossia palpebrosa (Sepiolida) is the most abundant nekto-benthic cephalopod in the Arctic; however, its feeding and trophic ecology are largely unknown. This work aims to assess the role of this species in Arctic ecosystems based on the contents of its stomachs and analyses of δ13C and δ15N stable isotopes in its beaks. The main taxa identified in...
Article
The Humboldt Current System presents high interannual variability, influenced by the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), whose implications in wildlife are not fully understood. We studied the isotopic niche of wild Humboldt penguins at Punta San Juan (Peru) during the pre-moult foraging trip in 4 consecutive years (2008–2011) under known oceanogr...
Article
Sympatry can lead to higher competition under climate change and other environmental pressures, including in South Georgia, Antarctica, where the two most common octopod species, Adelieledone polymorpha and Pareledone turqueti, occur side by side. Since cephalopods are typically elusive animals, the ecology of both species is poorly known. As beaks...
Article
Cephalopods are important prey in the diet of top predators, such as marine mammals and seabirds. However, detailed information on their trophic relationships in the Patagonian marine ecosystem is scarce, including those cephalopod species with commercial interest. The aims of this study were to evaluate the composition of the cephalopod component...
Poster
Full-text available
Here, we evaluated oxidative stress responses Cory’s shearwaters between pre laying and chick rearing periods and any relationships with their trophic ecology and spatial distribution at sea
Presentation
This presentation shows the results of the paper "Foraging strategies of a generalist seabird species, the yellow-legged gull, from GPS tracking and stable isotope analyses" https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00227-018-3421-0
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Hawksbills, the most tropical sea turtle species. In Príncipe (1º 37’ N; 7º 23’ E) is located one of the last remaining aggregations in West Africa. Therefore, it is of high conservation value but research on their biology and ecology remains scarce. Here we report, for the first time, data on the trophic and foraging ecology of both juvenile and a...
Article
Full-text available
The life histories of cephalopods are still not well described. Stable isotopic analysis of cephalopod beaks is an effective method to study of habitat and trophic ecology of this group of organisms. As beaks grow continuously throughout squid's life without replacement, we hypothesised that analysing different sections along the beak will provide...
Presentation
Cephalopods play a major role in Antarctic marine ecosystems and are a possible target for exploitation in the future. Despite this importance very little is known about its distribution and trophic ecology in different stages of individuals’ life. Applying a stable isotopic analysis of δ13C and δ15N in two regions of squid lower beaks’ (tip of the...
Article
Full-text available
Intrinsic markers, such as stable isotopes, are a powerful approach to trace wildlife movements because they do not require initial marking of the organism. The main limitation of the isotopic method is the lack of knowledge in spatio-temporal patterns and dynamics of stable isotopes in marine environments, especially at local scales. Here, we comb...
Article
Full-text available
Generalist and opportunistic species, such as the yellow-legged gull Larus michahellis, can feed on a wide variety of food from both marine and terrestrial origins. This work evaluates the potential foraging strategies (terrestrial, mix and marine) of the yellow-legged gull during the breeding season, in Berlenga (39°24′55″N, 9°30′28″W) and Deserta...
Article
Gonatus fabricii is the most abundant cephalopod species in the Arctic waters, and the only squid with a complete life cycle there. In order to understand its ecological role in the Arctic, we conducted stable isotope analyses of beaks from all ontogenetic groups from the west and east Greenland waters and the Barents Sea, complemented with morphol...
Article
Full-text available
Early life-history stages of cephalopods are known to play an important role as prey in food webs of the Southern Ocean, but little information is available about their biology and availability to predators. Top predators, such as penguins, are known to feed regularly on coastal juvenile/sub-adult cephalopods. Using eastern rockhopper penguins Eudy...
Article
Full-text available
As climate change, among other factors, is increasingly affecting Antarctic marine systems, competition for prey may increase between predators, particularly in the Antarctic Peninsula which has warmed more than elsewhere. Under such a context, we tested the feeding and trophic ecology of Gentoo (Pygoscelis papua) and Chinstrap (Pygoscelis antarcti...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Anthropogenic activities can have major impacts on the foraging behaviour and spatial distribution of coastal seabird species. We used GPS loggers to monitor yellow-legged gulls breeding at Berlenga (2011-2016) and Deserta (2015-2016) islands (Portugal), and also to monitor Audouin’s gulls at Deserta (2015). We found that, although the sea was the...
Article
Fisheries produce large quantities of discards, an important resource for scavenging seabirds. However, a policy reform banning discards, which is soon to be implemented within the EU, will impose a food shortage upon scavengers, and it is still largely unknown how scavengers will behave. We studied the diet (hard remains), trophic (stable isotope...
Article
Niche segregation between similar species will result from an avoidance of competition but also from environmental variability, including nowadays anthropogenic activities. Gulls are among the seabirds with greater behavioural plasticity, being highly opportunistic and feeding on a wide range of prey, mostly from anthropogenic origin. Here, we anal...
Article
Full-text available
Sexual segregation in foraging occurs in many animal species, resulting in the partitioning of resources and reduction of competition between males and females, yet the patterns and drivers of such segregation are still poorly understood. We studied the foraging movements (GPS-tracking), habitat use (habitat modelling) and trophic ecology (stable i...