Filip Vasic

Filip Vasic
University of Belgrade · Department of Ecological Engineering for Soil and Water Resources Protection

PhD Candidate

About

8
Publications
1,489
Reads
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13
Citations
Citations since 2017
8 Research Items
13 Citations
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468
201720182019202020212022202302468
Introduction
My research is focused on wetlands, specifically on ecosystem services that wetlands provide, land use, and climate change influence on wetlands, as well as policy and conservation-related topics in this field. Currently, I am doing research on soil carbon stock in Serbian wetlands (mostly Ramsar sites). Apart from this, I am always interested in various environmental research topics.
Additional affiliations
February 2019 - February 2020
Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research
Position
  • Researcher
September 2017 - December 2017
Universidad Nacional del Sur
Position
  • Researcher
Education
October 2016 - September 2017
University of Belgrade
Field of study
  • Degradation and Soil Resources Protection
October 2011 - October 2016
University of Belgrade
Field of study
  • Department of Ecological Engineering for Soil and Water Resources Protection

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Full-text available
Humans are exposed to agricultural soils through inhalation, dermal contact, or the consumption of food. Human health may be at risk when soils are contaminated; while some soil contaminants such as heavy metals (HMs) have been extensively studied, others such as micro(nano)plastics (MNPs) or antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) pose novel threats....
Poster
Full-text available
Integrated watershed management has gained increasing importance in recent years, given its ecological, economic, and social importance. In order for watershed management to be in accordance with these principles, and at the same time efficient, it is necessary to analyze and integrate a number of different factors. This literature review determine...
Article
Full-text available
The intensification of agriculture over the last few decades has caused habitat loss, which poses a significant threat to the survival of populations and species. Where habitats are connected, populations may escape the destruction of their habitat by migrating to another one. Consequently, the functional connectivity of landscapes has become an im...
Article
Full-text available
Kettle holes are small water bodies of glacial origin which mostly occur in agricultural landscapes. They provide numerous ecosystem services (ES), but their supply may be negatively affected by agricultural management. We conducted a literature review to identify which ES are supplied by kettle holes and to analyze feedbacks with agricultural mana...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This master thesis presents the contents of heavy metals (Zn, Pb, Cd) under forest in studying soils of Mt. Tara, localities GJ Tara, GJ Crni Vrh, GJ Zvezda. As part of the analysis, soil samples were taken at fixed depths of 0-10, 10-20, 20-40 cm as well as organic horizons. The content of the studied microelements in the soil was determined by th...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Our aim was to assess the importance of kettle holes in agricultural landscapes by quantifying the functional landscape connectivity in the three landscapes with kettle holes, both in the current state and in the case of the three predicted landscape scenarios. This approach should give us a possible perspective and guidelines on how to implement landscape connectivity into the land-use planning with a focal point for better conservation management of habitats.
Project
To manage agricultural areas around kettle holes sustainably, it is necessary to consider the ecosystem services provided by them and how their provision is affected by the agricultural management. While many studies have examined specific ES provided by kettle holes and analyzed effects from a limited number of agricultural management practices, no paper has yet provided an integrated overview of all ES provided by kettle holes and a full range of management practices affecting them. This paper contributes to closing this gap by providing a systematic overview of ES provided by kettle holes as well as the agricultural management practices affecting them. The objectives of this paper are to: 1. Conduct a systematic review of scientific literature to derive a list of ES from kettle holes analyzed in science; 2. Conduct an analysis of policy documents for a German test case to assess which ES are society perceives important and worth protection; 3. Review the state of knowledge about the interaction between ecosystem services supplied by kettle holes and agricultural management on adjacent fields.
Project
In February 2019, the Integrated Priority Project (IPP) “Small Water Bodies in an agricultural landscape: Ecosystem services of spatial and temporal within-field transition zones (SWBTrans)” was launched at the Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF). Our general objective is to quantify and balance ecosystem services and disservices of kettle holes in arable fields, considering explicitly long-distance effects as well as memory effects of occasional overflowing and falling dry. The project aims at assessing the range and size of kettle hole effects on adjacent arable fields with respect to regulating (water, microclimate, soil, pests), provisioning (crop yield) and supporting (biodiversity, primary production) ecosystem services or disservices, differentiating between kettle holes with fairly stable water level and those that often overflow or fell dry.