Fernanda Santos

Fernanda Santos
Oak Ridge National Laboratory/ UTK · Plant-Soil Interactions group

Ph.D., City University of New York
Disturbance Ecology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

About

28
Publications
14,126
Reads
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893
Citations
Introduction
Additional affiliations
July 2017 - June 2019
University of California, Merced
Position
  • Fellow
February 2014 - April 2015
Michigan State University
Position
  • Post-doctoral Associate Researcher
Education
August 2007 - September 2014
CUNY Graduate Center
Field of study
  • Earth and Environmental Sciences

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Manganese (Mn) is a biologically important and redox-active metal that may exert a poorly recognized control on carbon (C) cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Manganese influences ecosystem C dynamics by mediating biochemical pathways that include photosynthesis, serving as a reactive intermediate in the breakdown of organic molecules, and binding a...
Article
Full-text available
Pyrogenic organic carbon (PyC) is a complex, heterogeneous class of thermally altered organic substrates, but its dynamics and how its behavior changes with soil depth remain poorly understood. We conducted a laboratory incubation study to investigate the interactive effects of pyrolysis temperature and soil depth on the turnover of PyC compared to...
Article
Full-text available
The importance of soil age as an ecosystem driver across biomes remains largely unresolved. By combining a cross-biome global field survey, including data for 32 soil, plant, and microbial properties in 16 soil chronosequences, with a global meta-analysis, we show that soil age is a significant ecosystem driver, but only accounts for a relatively s...
Article
Full-text available
1.Fire is a powerful ecological and evolutionary force that regulates organismal traits, population sizes, species interactions, community composition, carbon and nutrient cycling, and ecosystem function. It also presents a rapidly growing societal challenge, due to both increasingly destructive wildfires and fire exclusion in fire‐dependent ecosys...
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The role of soil biodiversity in regulating multiple ecosystem functions is poorly understood, limiting our ability to predict how soil biodiversity loss might affect human wellbeing and ecosystem sustainability. Here, combining a global observational study with an experimental microcosm study, we provide evidence that soil biodiversity (bacteria,...
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Unlike plants and vertebrates, the ecological preferences, and potential vulnerabilities of soil invertebrates to environmental change, remain poorly understood in terrestrial ecosystems globally. We conducted a cross‐biome survey including 83 locations across six continents to advance our understanding of the ecological preferences and vulnerabili...
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Full-text available
In forest ecosystems, deadwood can improve carbon storage, nutrient availability, and water holding capacity in soils. Yet the effect of organic matter from deadwood such as lignin on these soil functions and their regulators are unknown. We hypothesized that carbon storage, exchangeable cations, and pore space increase with the quantity of lignin-...
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Full-text available
Identifying the global drivers of soil priming is essential to understanding C cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. We conducted a survey of soils across 86 globally-distributed locations, spanning a wide range of climates, biotic communities, and soil conditions, and evaluated the apparent soil priming effect using 13C-glucose labeling. Here we show...
Article
The Brazilian Cerrado has undergone extensive land-use change in the past century with large areas converted to agriculture and silviculture. Eucalyptus is the dominant planted tree species in Brazil, but the short rotations (6-7 years) and the associated soil disturbances can reduce soil organic matter (SOM), particularly in subsurface soil over l...
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Belowground organisms play critical roles in maintaining multiple ecosystem processes, including plant productivity, decomposition, and nutrient cycling. Despite their importance, however, we have a limited understanding of how and why belowground biodiversity (bacteria, fungi, protists, and invertebrates) may change as soils develop over centuries...
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Background: Fire plays an important role in controlling the cycling and composition of organic matter and nutrients in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. In this study, we investigated the effects of wildfire severity, time since fire, and site-level characteristics on (1) concentration of multiple solutes (dissolved organic carbon, DOC; total dis...
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Full-text available
Inventories of fire-derived (pyrogenic) C (PyC) stocks in soils remain incomplete for many parts of the world, yet are critical to reduce uncertainties in global PyC estimates. Additionally, PyC dynamics in soils remain poorly understood. For example, dissolved PyC (DPyC) fluxes from soil horizons, as well as the influence of historical fire events...
Article
In the next decades, the influence of wildfires in controlling the cycling and composition of soil organic matter (SOM) globally and in the Western US is expected to grow. While the impact of fires on bulk SOM has been extensively studied, the extent at which heating of soil affects the soluble component of SOM remains unclear. Here, we investigate...
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Full-text available
While fine roots (≤2-mm diameter) are major suppliers of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) to northern temperate and boreal forest soils, our understanding of how long-term plant and N inputs affect fine root decomposition rates and the amount of root-derived organic matter (OM) stabilized in forest soils is incomplete. We examined the influence of long-...
Article
a b s t r a c t Fire-derived organic matter (pyrogenic organic matter, or PyOM), despite its apparent long term stability in the environment, has recently been reported to degrade faster than previously thought. Current studies have suggested that the composition and structure of PyOM can provide new insights on the mechanisms by which C and N from...
Article
Pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM), the incomplete combustion product of organic materials, is considered stable in soils and represents a potentially important terrestrial sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. One well-established method of measuring PyOM in the environment is as benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCAs), a compound-specific method, which...
Article
Black carbon (BC), a product of the incomplete combustion of biomass (B) and fossil fuels (F), is present in the atmosphere in the form of aerosols, and is the second largest contributor to global warming. Global estimations of total BC emissions from B burning and F range between 50 and 270 Gt C year-1, and 12.6 and 24 Gt C year-1, respectively. T...
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Full-text available
The presence in the vegetation landscape of many varied scales of organization implies a complex set of land/atmosphere interactions. Larger scales of variability at the surface induce boundary layer heterogeneity and may induce secondary boundary layer circulation patterns. The quantification of the scales of heterogeneity in the surface vegetatio...
Article
A critical knowledge gap in soil organic carbon (SOC) cycling concerns the SOC portion collectively known as pyrogenic C or black carbon (BC), which is a chemically heterogeneous class of highly reduced compounds produced by incomplete combustion. While the stocks of BC are significant in surface soils worldwide, this SOC pool has been considered t...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
To better understand carbon and manganese interactions during decomposition of organic matter.