Femke Holwerda

Femke Holwerda
Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

30
Publications
10,115
Reads
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149
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2012 - April 2013
Universidade NOVA de Lisboa
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Projecto Dinoeggs; dinosaur eggs and embryos from the Late Jurassic Lourinhã Fm., Portugal
March 2011 - December 2011
Durham University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Stable-Isotope Biogeochemistry Laboratory (SIBL)

Publications

Publications (30)
Chapter
Eusauropods are large-bodied and long-necked dinosaurs that dominated the role of large herbivores in terrestrial ecosystems since at least the late Early Jurassic (Pliensbachian–Toarcian). Their early diversification is best recorded in South America where the best-preserved eusauropods and close relatives from this period of time have been found....
Article
Full-text available
Middle Jurassic sauropod taxa are poorly known, due to a stratigraphic bias of localities yielding body fossils. One such locality is Cerro Cóndor North, Cañadón Asfalto Formation, Patagonia, Argentina, dated to latest Early–Middle Jurassic. From this locality, the holotype of Patagosaurus fariasi Bonaparte 1986 is revised. The material consists of...
Article
Full-text available
The Cretaceous Kem Kem beds of Morocco and equivalent beds in Algeria have produced a rich fossil assemblage, yielding, amongst others, isolated sauropod teeth, which can be used in species diversity studies. These Albian-Cenomanian (∼113–93.9 Ma) strata rarely yield sauropod body fossils, therefore, isolated teeth can help to elucidate the faunal...
Article
Full-text available
Gondwanan Jurassic non-neosauropod eusauropods are key for the understanding of sauropod evolution, although their phylogenetic interrelationships remain poorly understood. However, following the revision of the holotype of a key taxon from the early Middle Jurassic Cañadón Asfalto Formation Patagonia, Argentina, Patagosaurus fariasi, the phylogene...
Article
Full-text available
Although sauropodomorph dinosaurs have been known for a long time from the Late Triassic of central Europe, sauropodomorph diversity and faunal composition has remained controversial until today. Here we review sauropodomorph material from the Canton Schaffhausen, Switzerland. The material comes from three different but geographically close localit...
Article
Dinosaur body fossilmaterial is rare in Scotland, previously known almost exclusively from the Great Estuarine Group on the Isle of Skye. We report the first unequivocal dinosaur fossil from the Isle of Eigg, belonging to a Bathonian (Middle Jurassic) taxon of uncertain affinity. The limb bone NMS G.2020.10.1 is incomplete, but through a combinatio...
Chapter
We continue our trip back in time through the Mesozoic, visiting several different ecosystems across the planet. Each of these was strongly influenced by the continental breakup from a single landmass into several tectonic plates and associated landmasses during this period. We will visit localities on several continents, observe how their vertebra...
Article
Full-text available
Eine internationale Forschergruppe beschreibt in der aktuellen Ausgabe des Swiss Journal of Geosciences einen für die Wissenschaft neuen Dinosaurier aus dem Kanton Schaffhausen unter dem Namen Schleitheimia schutzi. Dabei stützen sich die Wissenschaftler sowohl auf ältere Funde eines lokalen Sammlers als auch auf Fossilien aus einer Grabung im Jahr...
Article
Full-text available
Four isolated sauropod axial elements from the Oxford Clay Formation (Callovian, Middle Jurassic) of Peterborough, UK, are described. Two associated posterior dorsal vertebrae show a dorsoventrally elongated centrum and short neural arch, and nutrient or pneumatic foramina, most likely belonging to a non-neosauropod eusauropod, but showing ambiguou...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Cretaceous Kem Kem beds of Morocco and equivalent beds in Algeria have produced a rich fossil assemblage, yielding, amongst others, isolated sauropod teeth, which can be used in species diversity studies. These Albian-Cenomanian (~113 – 93.9 Ma) strata rarely yield sauropod body fossils, therefore, isolated teeth can help to elucidate the fauna...
Article
Full-text available
A set of associated left pedal elements of a sauropod dinosaur from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in Weston County, Wyoming, is described here. Several camarasaurids, a nearly complete small brachiosaur, and a small diplodocid have been found at this locality, but none match the exceptionally large size of the pedal elements. Next to the as...
Data
Eusauropod metatarsal V elongation Red ratios are based on measurements taken from figures.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Titanosaurs were the last-surviving group of sauropod dinosaurs, having persisted until the end-Cretaceous. Since the early 21st century, knowledge of this diverse and cosmopolitan group of dinosaurs has greatly improved, although many aspects of their biology and evolutionary history remain poorly understood. In particular, knowledge of Late Creta...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian, 100.5Ma – 93.9Ma) Kem Kem beds of Morocco and equivalent beds in Algeria have produced a rich fossil assemblage, yielding, among others, many isolated teeth which can be used in species diversity studies. As this area is rare in herbivore body fossils, these isolated teeth provide a different approach to analyzing p...
Article
Full-text available
Eusauropods were a group of herbivorous dinosaurs that evolved during the Early Jurassic and dominated the terrestrial ecosystems throughout the Jurassic and Cretaceous. A peak of diversity is represented by the Late Jurassic, when most of the lineages of the derived clade, Neosauropoda, are represented. Different lineages of eusauropods differ in...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Callovian Oxford Clay of England has yielded a rich and diverse marine fauna, mainly discovered and described by Alfred Leeds. However, occasionally it also brought forth terrestrial fossils, including four isolated cases of sauropod remains, one of a stegosaurid, and another of a dryosaurid. Thus far, only Cetiosaurus oxoniensis and Cetiosauri...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Callovian Oxford Clay of England has yielded a rich and diverse marine fauna, mainly discovered and described by Alfred Leeds. However, occasionally it also brought forth terrestrial fossils, including four isolated cases of sauropod remains, one of a stegosaurid, and another of a dryosaurid. Thus far, only Cetiosaurus oxoniensis and Cetiosauri...
Article
Upper Maastrichtian to lower Paleocene, coarse-grained deposits of the Lefip an Formation in Chubut Province , (Patagonia, Argentina) provide an opportunity to study environmental changes across the Cretaceous–Palaeo-gene (K–Pg) boundary in a shallow marine depositional environment. Marine palynological and organic geochemical analyses were perform...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
During the Late Cretaceous, mosasaurs were successful marine reptiles, achieving a worldwide distribution and occupying a wide array of ecological niches. Recent research has aided in identifying the feeding guilds of the various mosasaur taxa. In the type area of the Maastrichtian Stage (southeast Netherlands, northeast Belgium), five species are...
Article
Full-text available
The early Middle Jurassic is regarded as the period when sauropods diversified and became major components of the terrestrial ecosystems. Not many sites yield sauropod material of this time; however, both cranial and postcranial material of eusauropods have been found in the Cañadón Asfalto Formation (latest Early Jurassic–early Middle Jurassic) in...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
OSTEOLOGICAL REVISION OF THE HOLOTYPE OF PATAGOSAURUS FARIASI, A BASAL EUSAUROPOD FROM ARGENTINA HOLWERDA, Femke, Bavarian State collection for Paleontology and Geology/ LMU, Munich, Germany; RAUHUT, Oliver, Bayerische Staatssammlung fur Palaontologie und Geologie, Munchen, Germany; POL, Diego, CONICET-MPEF, Trelew, Argentina The sauropod dinosaur...
Article
Full-text available
Teeth of the small durophagous mosasaur Carinodens belgicus are known from Maastrichtian Atlantic-Tethyan deposits worldwide. The peculiar dentition of Carinodens inspired debate and speculation on its dietary niche ever since its first description. In this contribution, we describe the macro- and microwear pattern in five well-preserved isolated t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Dinosaur eggs and eggshells of Jurassic age or older are relatively rare worldwide when compared with Cretaceous ones. However, the Lourinha region in central-west Portugal is rich in Kimmeridgian-Tithonian dinosaur egg- and eggshell localities, two with associated theropod embryo material of Lourinhanosaurus and another large theropod. Here, we de...
Article
Full-text available
Two new Late Jurassic (uppermost Late Kimmeridgian) dinosaur eggshell sites are described, Casal da Rola and Porto das Barcas, both near Lourinha˜, central-west Portugal. Casal da Rola yields eggshells with an obliquiprismatic morphotype comparable to those from a nest with the associated fossil embryos from Paimogo, tentatively assigned to the the...
Article
In order to clarify the nature of the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) transition at southern high latitudes, quantitative marine palynological analysis has been performed on samples from the Lefipan Formation (province of Chubut, Patagonia, Argentina). The shallow marine/estuarine nature of the succession prohibits the occurrence of age-diagnostic biot...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
(revised by Robert A. Gastaldo) Introduction - Direct contact with Nature is attractive to students and has an important impact on their desire to study, conserve and protect the environment. Likewise, learning programmes aiming to increase interest for palaeoenvironmental research, which informs us of past change, can be supplemented by virtual visits to the deep time (geological) contexts that are rich in ancient records of planet Earth. Such personal visits create emotions, and combining them with scientific instructions is a powerful teaching strategy. Topics and aims - Based on the considerations above, a coordinated project has been started to build an international undergraduate and post-graduate learning programme, supported by a book, about past environments. The aim is to illustrate several of the many steps of the history of Nature on our planet, exploiting the contribution of leading experts of different deep time intervals. The course will include 16 lecture Units of ca. 700 slides with a focus on terrestrial palaeoenvironments. Outstanding features and major transformations of natural systems during the Cenozoic, Mesozoic, and Palaeozoic will be shown by telling stories of key sites, particular geological contexts or objects, and distinguished research and researchers. Additionally, the goals of this learning programme are to be: 1) Attractive for students, simulating a walk through Nature; 2) "Relaxing" for both students, teachers, and other interested individuals, using simple language and avoiding complex topics that would need long explanations; 3) Up-to-date and scientifically correct, including artistic reconstructions of the highest fidelity; 4) Providing information and examples from around the world with a special focus on less known and less conventional information, such as palaeobotanical and palynological topics that can seem less attractive than others (e.g. fossil vertebrates) at first glance; and 5) Available for use to all contributors in its entirety for free. Palaeobotanical and palynological interest - The project is still a work in progress and open to accept helpful suggestions and constructive contributions from the palaeobotanical and palynological communities, who can propose relevant materials that are attractive to the intended audience. Since palynomorph-bearing organisms represent landscape-forming elements often not preserved as megafossils, a particularly successful opportunity is available. In fact, reconstructions of such organisms, in the framework of their ancient environments, complements information gained from the megafossil they produced. This "whole-organism" approach is particularly intriguing but also difficult to achieve, in particular for land plants that are generally fossilized in several scattered micro- and macroscopic parts, whose puzzle is very hard to piece together.