Felix Schulte

Felix Schulte
European Centre for Minority Issues

PhD

About

17
Publications
1,303
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17
Citations

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Scholars debate whether self-rule is conducive to intrastate violence or peace. We argue that to resolve this problem the entire institutional setup of the state must be taken into account. Whereas the centripetalist view deemphasizes self-rule as a vehicle of interethnic competition, consociationalism holds that it is the interplay of accommodativ...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Advisory mandate for the OSCE A Reference Tool for Evaluating the Implementation of Ljubljana Guidelines-based Policy In 2012, the OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities issued the so-called Ljubljana Guidelines: recommendations for member states to foster integration in increasingly diverse societies. A few years later, in December 2019,...
Article
Full-text available
The high degree of conceptual confusion in the field of territorial self-governance constitutes a major obstacle to robust findings. Based on a parsimonious definition involving three individually necessary and jointly sufficient criteria (constitutional protection, territorial quality, and strength of self-rule), we develop a new typology of terri...
Book
Bringing together comparative politics, conflict research and social psychology, this book presents a novel theory to explain the consolidation outcomes of post-conflict autonomy arrangements. It builds on Social Identity Theory and identifies a successful process of ethnic recognition as the key prerequisite for peaceful interethnic cohabitation t...
Chapter
This chapter links the conditions of the two empirical models from Chap. 3 with the assumed three-stage social mechanism of ethnic recognition as central prerequisite of autonomy consolidation to two multi-causal process models. The causal models are then tested against two representative cases by theory-testing process tracing. The successful case...
Chapter
This chapter deals with the central explanandum of the study and finds empirical evidence for the high variance in consolidation outcomes of post-conflict autonomy arrangements. To explain this variance, the chapter builds on Social Identity Theory and develops two multi-causal models, which explain autonomy consolidation as a successful process of...
Chapter
This chapter summarizes the findings of the study, discusses its contribution to current research on post-conflict institutional engineering, and identifies some implications for future research efforts. Finally, based on the empirical results, three key policy recommendations for peace builders are derived. First, the critical importance of a high...
Chapter
This introductory chapter argues that the peaceful regulation of ethnic self-determination conflicts require the institutional recognition of ethnic identity. Territorial autonomies, which differ conceptually from other managing institutions such as decentralization, federalism, or executive power sharing, are a suitable institutional option to man...
Chapter
The first empirical part of the study presents the calibration decisions and conducts the set-theoretical analysis. In order to obtain a comprehensive picture of the positive and negative determinants of autonomy consolidation outcomes, the core conditions identified in Chap. 2 as well as other important factors such as the electoral system and rul...
Article
Full-text available
Research on territorial autonomy has gained new impetus in recent years. This research note presents a first comprehensive bibliometric analysis of autonomy studies. It introduces the Territorial Autonomy Literature Datasets (TALD), surveys of over 800 peer-reviewed and non peer-reviewed articles published between 1945 and 2018. The study reveals s...
Article
Full-text available
Territorial autonomies have been increasingly implemented as tools for the regulation of ethnic self-determination conflicts. Recent literature has primarily focused on the debate about the general conflict-solving potential of territorial self-government in multi-ethnic societies. However, autonomy consolidation is not an entirely endogenous proce...
Preprint
Territorial autonomies (TA) are increasingly implemented as tools forregulating ethnic conflicts. Since there are successful as well as failed cases,the ongoing debate about a general conflict-solving potential is not a veryfruitful one. The article turns towards the analysis of various factors affectingthe success and failure of conflict regulatin...
Article
Territorial autonomies are increasingly implemented as tools for regulating ethnic conflicts. Since there are successful as well as failed cases, the ongoing debate about a general conflict-solving potential is not a very fruitful one. The article turns towards the analysis of various factors affecting the success of conflict regulating autonomies....
Article
Ethnic conflicts continue to be the most common form of intrastate conflict. The international community makes efforts to transform war-torn societies into peaceful democracies, often overlooking that building peace can conflict with building democracy, and vice versa. Using findings of the rich literature of Institutional Engineering, this article...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The high degree of conceptual confusion in the field of territorial self-governance constitutes a major obstacle to robust findings. Based on a parsimonious definition involving three individually necessary and jointly sufficient criteria (constitutional protection, territorial quality, and strength of self-rule), we develop a new typology of territorial self-governance that carves out subnational differences in kind. We take a fresh look at territorial self-governance in more than 2,200 second-level regions in 96 Western and non-Western democracies, semi-democracies, and a selection of autocratic regimes between 2000 and 2018.
Project
Bringing together comparative politics, conflict research and social psychology, this book presents a novel theory to explain the consolidation outcomes of post-conflict autonomy arrangements. It builds on Social Identity Theory and identifies a successful process of ethnic recognition as the key prerequisite for peaceful interethnic cohabitation through territorial self-governance. As this process is highly context-dependent, the study identifies relevant structural and actor-centered factors and analyzes their occurrence in the consolidation periods of nineteen autonomy arrangements worldwide using Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA). The author concludes that elites accept autonomy reforms if they promise a high degree of self-determination and, at the same time, ethnic recognition is not hindered by horizontal inequalities. Bargaining efforts succeed within inclusive institutions involving non-nationalist parties and international organizations. Autonomy reforms fail if the degree of self-rule offered is too low and strong inequalities generate new grievances. Autocratic rule, nationalist parties, and a lack of international attention provide a breeding ground for further centrifugal activities. In-depth case studies on South Tyrol and the Chittagong Hill Tracts provide further evidence for the theoretical models.
Project
The OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities (HCNM) provides “early warning” and, as appropriate, “early action” at the first signs of tension involving national minority issues. The High Commissioner’s holistic approach to conflict prevention takes a longer term perspective in order to address the root causes of ethnic tension. As part of this long-term approach towards conflict prevention, consecutive High Commissioners have recommended that the OSCE participating States adopt measures and implement policies aimed specifically at promoting the integration of diverse groups within society. In 2012, the HCNM summarized the institution’s experience in this area in a landmark publication entitled The Ljubljana Guidelines on Integration of Diverse Societies. The Ljubljana Guidelines provide guiding principles and practical advice on how to elaborate and implement policies that facilitate the integration of society. The guidelines cover institutional, policy, legal, social and cultural measures that together promote the integration of society. Integration is understood as a dynamic, multi-actor process of mutual engagement that facilitates effective participation by all members of a diverse society and fosters a shared and inclusive sense of belonging at national and local levels. The HCNM has advised on, and supported, the development and implementation of integration strategies in several OSCE participating States. Data is important in this process. Understanding baselines and setting targets are prerequisites to defining concrete measures to implement integration strategies. Indicators guide data collection and can thus inform decisions on where to invest resources. This is vital for the development of evidence-based policies.