Feiyue Wang

Feiyue Wang
University of Manitoba | UMN · Centre for Earth Observation Science & Department of Environment and Geography

Ph.D.

About

191
Publications
36,196
Reads
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8,015
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2010 - February 2010
Griffith University
Position
  • Visiting Professor
Description
  • On sabbatical leave.
March 2009 - present
University of Manitoba
Position
  • Professor (Full)
March 2004 - March 2009
University of Manitoba
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Education
September 1990 - July 1995
Peking University
Field of study
  • Environmental Geochemistry
September 1986 - July 1990
Wuhan University
Field of study
  • Environmental Chemistry

Publications

Publications (191)
Article
The transformation of mercury (Hg) in the environment plays a vital role in the cycling of Hg and its risk to the ecosystem and human health. Of particular importance are Hg oxidation/reduction and methylation/demethylation processes driven or mediated by the dynamics of light, microorganisms, and organic carbon, among others. Advances in understan...
Article
Anthropogenic mercury (Hg) undergoes long-range transport to the Arctic where it is transformed into methylmercury (MeHg), potentially leading to high exposure in some Arctic inhabitants and wildlife. The environmental exposure of Hg is determined not just by the amount of Hg entering the Arctic, but also by biogeochemical and ecological processes...
Article
Full-text available
Silver (Ag) production in Hispanic America between the 16th and 19th centuries is thought to be one of the largest sources of anthropogenic mercury (Hg) emissions in history. Recent reviews of the chemistry behind the patio process, which used Hg amalgamation to extract Ag from ore, reveal that a large amount of the Hg may not have been immediately...
Article
Investigation of mercury (Hg) from atmospheric precipitation is important for evaluating its ecological impacts and developing mitigation strategies. Western China, which includes the Tibetan Plateau and the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, is one of the most remote region in the world and is understudied in regards to Hg precipitation. Here we r...
Article
Full-text available
There has been a considerable number of reports on Hg concentrations in Arctic mammals since the last Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) effort to review biological effects of the exposure to mercury (Hg) in Arctic biota in 2010 and 2018. Here, we provide an update on the state of the knowledge of health risk associated with Hg conce...
Article
Dramatic environmental shifts are occuring throughout the Arctic from climate change, with consequences for the cycling of mercury (Hg). This review summarizes the latest science on how climate change is influencing Hg transport and biogeochemical cycling in Arctic terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems. As environmental changes in the Arcti...
Article
Full-text available
Although studies of biogeochemical processes in polar sea ice have been increasing, similar research on relatively warm low-salinity sea ice remains sparse. In this study, we investigated biogeochemical properties of the landfast sea ice cover in the brackish Bothnian Bay (Northern Baltic Sea) and the possible role of this sea ice in mediating the...
Article
Full-text available
An influx of glacial meltwater has the ability to alter the properties of marine surface waters and their ability to exchange CO2 through changes to water column stratification and the inorganic carbon system. Here, we report how inputs of meteoric water affect the physical and biogeochemical properties of both the water column and the sea ice cove...
Research
Full-text available
Mercury (Hg), along with many other metals, is released by volcanoes and geothermal systems. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) is understood to be the dominant form of Hg in volcanic gas and can be transported great distances in the atmosphere prior to deposition on the Earth's surface environments. Much of the spectrum of Earth's volcanic activity i...
Article
Antimony (Sb) isotopes have been shown to be promising tracers for studying Sb cycling in the environment and its impact on ecosystem and human health. Yet precise measurements of Sb isotopic composition have been challenged by low Sb concentrations and high matrix effect and by the lack of a common reference material (zero-delta). Here we report a...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean sediments are the largest sink for mercury (Hg) sequestration and hence an important part of the global Hg cycle ¹ . Yet accepted global average Hg flux data for deep-ocean sediments (> 200 m depth) are not based on measurements on sediments but are inferred from sinking particulates ² . Mercury fluxes have never been reported from the deepes...
Article
Full-text available
Mercury is a potent neurotoxin that poses health risks to the global population. Anthropogenic mercury emissions to the atmosphere are projected to decrease in the future due to enhanced policy efforts such as the Minamata Convention, a legally-binding international treaty entered into force in 2017. Here, we report the development of a comprehensi...
Preprint
Full-text available
The episodic build-up of gas-phase reactive bromine species over sea ice and snowpack in the springtime Arctic plays an important role in the boundary layer, causing annual concurrent depletion of ozone and gaseous elemental mercury during polar sunrise. Extensive studies have shown that these phenomena, known as bromine explosion events (BEEs), oz...
Article
This study describes the validation of a diffusive gradients in thin film (DGT) technique for determining lanthanide rare earth elements (REEs) and in situ measurements of REEs in sediment pore waters. Laboratory experiments demonstrated that Chelex-100 binding layers had uptake efficiencies ranging from 78.0% to 92.3% for all REEs. An eluent of 1...
Article
Volcanism is a potentially important natural source of mercury (Hg) to the environment. However, its impact on the global Hg cycle remains poorly understood despite advances over the last five decades. This represents a major uncertainty in our understanding of the relative contributions of natural and anthropogenic Hg sources to the global atmosph...
Preprint
Full-text available
Mercury (Hg) is a potent neurotoxin that poses health risks to the global population. Anthropogenic Hg emissions to the atmosphere are projected to decrease in the future due to enhanced policy efforts such as the Minamata Convention, a legally-binding international treaty entered into force in 2017. To project the health benefits of emission reduc...
Article
Full-text available
Mercury (Hg), a global contaminant, is emitted mainly in its elemental form Hg0 to the atmosphere where it is oxidized to reactive HgII compounds, which efficiently deposit to surface ecosystems. Therefore, the chemical cycling between the elemental and oxidized Hg forms in the atmosphere determines the scale and geographical pattern of global Hg d...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Naturally occurring natural organic matter (NOM) is one of the important chemical components in natural environments. Many studies have shown that NOM plays a significant role in many physical and biogeochemical processes and had important eco-environmental effects in aquatic ecosystems. For example, NOM played an important role in water quality an...
Article
Full-text available
Ikaite (CaCO3·6H2O) precipitation in sea ice has been shown to affect CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and ocean. A laboratory study indicates that it could also co-precipitate phosphate from sea ice, which has the potential to affect sea-ice biogeochemical processes. However, the relative importance of ikaite precipitation on phosphate removal...
Article
Mercury (Hg) deposition through litterfall has been regarded as the main input of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0) into forest ecosystems. We hypothesize that earlier studies largely underestimated this sink because the contribution of Hg0 uptake by moss and the downward transport to wood and throughfall is overlooked. To test the hypothesis, we inv...
Preprint
The Minamata Convention is a legally-binding international treaty aimed at reducing the anthropogenic release of mercury, a potent neurotoxin. However, its human health benefit has not been quantified on a global scale. Here we evaluate the Convention’s benefit by a coupled climate-atmosphere-land-ocean-ecosystem model and a human mercury exposure...
Article
Mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) accumulation since the Industrial Revolution has been generally observed to increase concurrently in lake sedimentary records around the world. Located downwind during the monsoon season from a rapidly developing South Asia, the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau are expected to receive direct anthropogenic Hg and Pb loadings,...
Article
Gaseous elemental mercury (Hg⁰) comprises the majority of atmospheric mercury (Hg) and results in long-range transport of Hg. Secondary emissions from the marine surface mixed layer result in spatial and temporal Hg⁰ variability, which subsequently determine marine pools of divalent mercury (HgII) available for methylation. We measured atmospheric...
Article
The discovery of a pervasive subsurface methylmercury maximum in the world's oceans highlights the importance of understanding the processes and rates that produce and destroy this potent neurotoxin in seawater. Two approaches have been published in the literature, one based on the spatial distribution of mercury species in seawater and, more recen...
Article
Mercury (Hg) transformations in sediments are key factors in the Hg exposure pathway for wildlife and humans yet are poorly characterized in Arctic lakes. As the Arctic is rapidly warming, it is important to understand how the rates of Hg methylation and demethylation (wich determine Hg bioavailability) change with temperature in lake sediments. Me...
Article
As global climate continues to warm, melting of glaciers releases a large quantity of mercury (Hg) originally locked in ice into the atmosphere and downstream ecosystems. Here, we show an opposite process that captures atmospheric Hg through glacier-to-vegetation succession. Our study using stable isotope techniques at 3 succession sites on the Tib...
Presentation
Full-text available
Among the many trace metal volatiles outgassed from volcanic and geothermal systems, mercury (Hg) is considered the most environmentally significant due to its harmful effects on biological systems and its propensity for long-range atmospheric transport in its stable elemental form Hg(0) (known as gaseous elemental mercury or GEM). Since 1971 when...
Poster
Full-text available
Volcán Poás is confirmed as a low Hg-emitting environment. • New Hg/SO2 ratio of 1.4 × 10-7 corresponding to a Hg flux of 77 kg a-1 • Hg/SO2 ratio increased, but less than projected for erupting volcanoes, suggesting that SO2 and Hg do not share same source. • Measurements of Hg/SO2 during two stages of activity are within range of repeated studies...
Article
Microplastics (plastic particles <5 mm) are an emerging concern in Arctic sea ice with measured concentrations orders of magnitude higher than in surface seawater. However, incorporation of microplastics into sea ice, and their impact on sea ice properties, is unknown. We added microplastic particles in a microcosm experiment to determine microplas...
Article
Full-text available
This article introduces the EU Horizon 2020 research project GRACE (Integrated oil spill response actions and environmental effects), which focuses on a holistic approach towards investigating and understanding the hazardous impact of oil spills and the environmental impacts and benefits of a suite of marine oil spill response technologies in the c...
Article
Cryoconite is a granular aggregate, comprising of both mineral and biological material and known to accumulate atmospheric contaminants. In this study, cryoconite were sampled from seven high-elevation glaciers in Western China to investigate the spatial and altitudinal patterns of atmospheric mercury (Hg) accumulation in the cryoconite. The result...
Article
The Minamata Convention to reduce anthropogenic mercury (Hg) emissions entered into force in 2017, and attention is now focused on how to best monitor its effectiveness at reducing Hg exposure to humans. A key question is how closely Hg concentrations in the human food chain, especially in fish and other aquatic wildlife, will track the changes in...
Chapter
Full-text available
https://www.unep.org/resources/publication/global-mercury-assessment-2018
Chapter
Full-text available
https://www.unep.org/resources/publication/global-mercury-assessment-2018
Article
Mercury (Hg) is a global environmental contaminant. Major anthropogenic sources of Hg emission include gold mining and the burning of fossil fuels. Once deposited in aquatic environments, Hg can undergo redox reactions, form complexes with ligands, and adsorb onto particles. It can also be methylated by microorganisms. Mercury, especially its methy...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic mercury (Hg(0)) emissions oxidize to gaseous Hg(II) compounds, before deposition to Earth surface ecosystems. Atmospheric reduction of Hg(II) competes with deposition, thereby modifying the magnitude and pattern of Hg deposition. Global Hg models have postulated that Hg(II) reduction in the atmosphere occurs through aqueous-phase phot...
Article
Full-text available
The solubility of CO2 in seawater is known to increase at colder temperatures, but few studies have examined the CO2 solubility in seawater and in sea-ice brines at sub-zero (Celsius) temperatures. The thermodynamic Henry's Law constant (KH) for CO2 in concentrated NaCl solutions was determined for the first time at sub-zero temperatures and salini...
Article
Full-text available
Mercury (Hg) is a contaminant of major concern in Arctic marine ecosystems. Decades of Hg observations in marine biota from across the Canadian Arctic show generally higher concentrations in the west than in the east. Various hypotheses have attributed this longitudinal biotic Hg gradient to regional differences in atmospheric or terrestrial inputs...
Article
In support of international efforts to reduce mercury (Hg) exposure in humans and wildlife, this paper reviews the literature concerning global Hg emissions, cycling and fate, and presents revised global and oceanic Hg budgets for the 2018 United Nations Global Mercury Assessment. We assessed two competing scenarios about the impacts of 16th - late...
Conference Paper
This paper presents an overview of the research conducted to date at the University of Manitoba Sea-ice Environmental Research Facility pertaining to the microwave remote sensing of oil spills in the presence of sea ice. As such, a description of the facility and the design of oil-in-sea ice experiments is provided along with a summary of the prima...
Article
The partial pressure of CO2 in surface water (pCO2sw) measured within the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) and Baffin Bay was highly variable with values ranging from strongly undersaturated (118 μatm) to slightly supersaturated (419 μatm) with respect to the atmospheric levels (~386 μatm) during summer and autumn 2011. During summer, melting sea...
Article
Full-text available
Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is an important parameter to characterize the biogeochemical processes in sea ice and across the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere interface. The main challenge in bulk sea ice processing for DIC analysis is to melt the ice core without exposure to the air, which otherwise might contaminate the sample. A common practice is t...
Article
The water level fluctuation zone (WLFZ) of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) in China is a unique geomorphological unit that undergoes annual flooding and drying alternation cycle. The alternating redox conditions within the WLFZ are expected to result in dynamic cycling of reduced sulfur species, which could affect mercury (Hg) methylation due to t...
Article
Full-text available
Ikaite (CaCO3•6H2O) is a metastable calcium carbonate mineral that forms at low temperature and/or high pressure. Ikaite precipitates in sea ice and may play a significant role in air–sea CO2 exchange in ice covered seas and oceans. However, the spatial and temporal dynamics of ikaite in sea ice are poorly understood due to few available measuremen...
Article
Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) in the marine boundary layer (MBL), and dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) in surface seawater of the Southern Ocean were measured in the austral summer from December 13, 2014 to February 1, 2015. GEM concentrations in the MBL ranged from 0.4 to 1.9 ng m− 3 (mean ± standard deviation: 0.9 ± 0.2 ng m− 3), whereas DGM con...
Presentation
Volcanic systems are a poorly-constrained, natural contributor to the global mercury cycle. Lack of comprehensive data has led to uncertainties in 1) the total amount of mercury emitted from volcanoes; 2) the speciation of mercury upon release from volcanic plumes; and 3) the pathways and timing of deposition following plume release. Three volcanoe...
Conference Paper
(13th International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant, Providence Rhode Island July 2017: Integrating mercury research and policy in a changing world) Volcanic systems are a poorly-constrained, natural contributor to the global mercury cycle. Lack of comprehensive data has led to uncertainties in 1) the total amount of mercury emitted fr...
Article
Full-text available
The Arctic Ocean is rapidly changing from thicker multiyear to thinner first-year ice cover, with significant consequences for radiative transfer through the ice pack and light availability for algal growth. A thinner, more dynamic ice cover will possibly result in more frequent leads, covered by newly formed ice with little snow cover. We studied...
Article
Geochemical analyses in varved lake sediment cores (Lake Montcortès, Pre-Pyrenees) allowed reconstruction of mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb) atmospheric deposition over the past seven centuries in the Pyrenees (NE Spain). Accumulation Rates (AR) from the Middle Ages to the Industrial Period ranged from 2500 to 26130 μg m².y⁻¹ and 15–152 μg m².y⁻¹ for Pb...
Chapter
This chapter provides a synthesis and critical review of the current understanding of transport and transformation of chemical contaminants in the sea ice environment. Using mercury, hexachlorocyclohexane and petrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as examples, we show that sea ice acts both as a passive, temporary storage, and an active concen...
Article
Full-text available
Long-term continuous measurements of speciated atmospheric mercury were conducted from July 2013 to June 2014 in Hefei, a midlatitude inland city in eastern central China that experiences frequent haze pollution. The mean concentrations (±standard deviation) of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and particle-bound mercu...
Article
Full-text available
Long-term continuous measurements of speciated atmospheric mercury were conducted at Hefei, a mid-latitude inland city in east central China, from July 2013 to June 2014. The mean concentrations (± standard deviation) of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) and particle-bound mercury (PBM) were 3.95 ± 1.93 ng m−3, 2.49 ±...
Article
During springtime in the Arctic, bromine explosion events occur when high concentrations of reactive bromine species are observed in the boundary layer with the concurrence of ozone depletion events and mercury depletion events. While a variety of substrates such as snow, sea ice, frost flowers and aerosols have been proposed to be the substrate an...
Article
Alpine lake sediments and glacier ice cores retrieved from high mountain regions can provide long-term records of atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic contaminants such as mercury (Hg). In this study, eight lake sediment cores and one glacier ice core were collected from high elevations across the Himalaya-Tibet region to investigate the chronol...
Article
Full-text available
Marine phytoplankton are known to produce mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) for protection against UV radiation. To assess whether the same strategy applies to sea ice-associated communities, MAAs were measured in algal communities associated with surface melt ponds, sea ice (bottom 3 cm), sea ice−water interface below melt ponds, and underlying...
Chapter
The stability of sedimentary metal profiles (defined as the absence of significant changes in profile shapes or concentrations as the accumulated metals are progressively buried), or the ability to reconstruct the original profiles following dispersion by diagenetic processes, is a key requirement for the robust interpretation of metal deposition h...