Fedor A. Dokshin

Fedor A. Dokshin
University of Toronto | U of T · Department of Sociology

About

9
Publications
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373
Citations
Introduction
My research and teaching interests are in political sociology, organizations, environmental sociology, social networks, and social movements. I specialize in the application of computational techniques to novel sources of data including administrative data and public records, online data, and large-scale text data. Read more about my research on my website: http://fedordokshin.weebly.com/

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Understanding public response to controversial projects, industries, and policies is of central focus to social scientists. During many of these contentious episodes, governmental agencies collect input from the public in the form of public comments. Public comments offer rich data for research on public response, and in recent years researchers ha...
Article
Full-text available
Public response to energy projects affects the emergence of new technologies and the distribution of their risks and benefits. Here we use thousands of individually authored comments submitted during a regulatory review of unconventional shale gas development in New York State to reconcile previous, inconsistent results about the relationship betwe...
Article
The influence of material interests and partisanship on local residents’ responses to proposed shale gas development (SGD) is examined. Complementing existing research on attitudes toward SGD, public response is conceptualized and measured as a political behavior. A novel research design combines information on participation in town board hearings...
Article
Full-text available
In the interest of enlarging their constituencies, social movements often broaden mobilization efforts beyond the directly aggrieved, beneficiary populations. The authors examine this process through an analysis of a movement against unconventional oil and gas development (UOGD or “fracking”) in Illinois. Using data on more than 37,000 public comme...
Article
Full-text available
Passionate disagreements about climate change, stem cell research and evolution raise concerns that science has become a new battlefield in the culture wars. We used data derived from millions of online co-purchases as a behavioural indicator for whether shared interest in science bridges political differences or selective attention reinforces exis...
Article
Full-text available
A long line of research documents the essential role of social networks in mediating the recruitment and retention of members in organizations. But organizations also comprise a primary context where people form social ties. We investigate how the network structure an organization creates among its members influences its ability to grow and reprodu...
Article
What drives local decisions to prohibit industrial land uses? This study examines the passage of municipal ordinances prohibiting gas development using hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) in New York State. I argue that local action against fracking depended on multiple conceptions of the shale gas industry. Matching these alternative conceptions wit...
Article
Full-text available
Amuch-theorized but seldom-tested theory is that elites achieve cohesion via the social network they form through their affiliations with local clubs, religious institutions, civic groups, and other voluntary associations. But few scholars have considered how increasing diversity with respect to elites' gender, race, and social class may undermine...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper investigates some of the social roles people play in the online community of Wikipedia. We start from qualitative comments posted on community oriented pages, wiki project memberships, and user talk pages in order to identify a sample of editors who represent four key roles: substantive experts, technical editors, vandal fighters, and so...

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