Federica Formato

Federica Formato
University of Brighton · School of Humanities

PhD Linguistics

About

18
Publications
4,795
Reads
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43
Citations
Citations since 2017
12 Research Items
40 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023024681012
2017201820192020202120222023024681012
2017201820192020202120222023024681012
2017201820192020202120222023024681012
Introduction
I'm a linguist interested in gender, corpus linguistics, discourse analysis, sexist language. I also investigate language used by the media, parliaments and other speakers on violence against women. I wrote Gender, Ideology and Discourse in Italian for Palgrave. I have a considerable teaching experience in UK institutions and I am now a Lecturer in Sociolinguistics at Brighton Uni I'm the Book Review Editor of the Gender and Language Journal. http://federicaformato.wix.com/federicaformato
Additional affiliations
September 2015 - January 2016
Lancaster University
Position
  • LEAD MENTOR MOOC Corpus Linguistics
September 2014 - February 2015
Lancaster University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
October 2011 - June 2014
Lancaster University
Field of study
  • Linguistics

Publications

Publications (18)
Chapter
Language used for, about and by female politicians, is qualitatively and quantitatively investigated to demonstrate how language operates to signal gender, gendering and gendered prototyping. The media have found ways to expose a ‘war among female politicians’, manipulating the choices of the language they use to refer to themselves. Marked forms a...
Article
In this article, we investigate, through corpus linguistics and qualitative approaches, YouTube responses to an advert which attempts to bring to the fore detrimental masculine toxic behaviours. With the affordances proper to the medium - anonymity, disinhibition, and de-individuation - our investigation focuses on three gendered terms representing...
Article
Research has found humour and gender to be linked (Davies, 2006, Gendered sense of humor as expressed through aesthetic typifications. Journal of Pragmatics, 38(1), 96–113. doi:10.1016/j.pragma.2005.06.006; Kotthoff 2006, Gender and humor: The state of the art. Journal of pragmatics, 38(1), 4–25. doi:10.1016/j.pragma.2005.06.003), specifically with...
Article
JOURNAL OF LANGUAGE AND DISCRIMINATION Generic masculines – masculine forms used for women – are employed in many languages, for example English (Mills 2008), French (Coady 2018), Spanish (Bengoechea 2011) and German (Motschenbacher 2016), providing accounts of how gender is made visible in the language through morphological, lexical and syntactic...
Chapter
Grammatical gendered languages, such as Italian have a lexical, morphological and syntactic system that allows for the formation of gender in the language. A classification of how the Italian gender-specific grammar works and how it is manipulated to serve the ‘male as a norm’ discursive status quo is offered in this chapter. Telling examples show...
Chapter
Exploring the historical gendered fixed roles for women and men in the private, i.e. heterosexual relationships, demonstrates that these prove equally detrimental to women. The femminicidio, the crime in which men kill their on-going or former partners, is a widespread phenomenon worldwide as well as in Italy. Qualitative and quantitative language...
Chapter
Italy is a fruitful epistemological site, apt to investigate gendered language in relation to a deep-rooted sexist culture and an imbalanced society. Women in private and public spheres are still evaluated and judged against ‘male as a norm’. Notwithstanding an increase in the number of women accessing political arenas, they are still seen as inter...
Chapter
Academia is paying attention to ‘masculine as a norm’ with the aim to unravel the intricate relation between language and a sexist and historically male-oriented society. Activists, among whom, politicians, are also raising their voices to challenge the discursive status quo of language which reproduces an imbalanced society. Feminist linguist Alma...
Book
Full-text available
This book analyses gendered language in Italian, shedding light on how the Italian language constructs and reproduces the social imbalance between women and men, and presenting indirect and direct instances of asymmetrical constructions of gender in public and private roles. The author examines linguistic treatments of women in politics and the med...
Article
Full-text available
Italian female politicians are increasingly gaining access to the institutional public space, in some cases breaking the glass ceiling that has blocked them from reaching high positions. However, language used to attack them for their possible wrong doings or employed to represent themselves demonstrates that a rearrangement of a gendered fixed ord...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the way that the Italian media use language to refer to female ministers in the last three governments. While Italian is a genderspecific language (e.g., a root of the job titles can be followed by either feminine or masculine morphemes, singular and plural), it is common to use masculine forms to refer to and address women. Min...
Research
Full-text available
This is of interest of researchers in sexism and sexist language. We are looking forward to publishing issue 4 of the IGALAblog - see document for information.

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
In investigating grammatical gendered and sexist language it is important to take into consideration what speakers think about the linguistic variants that they consciously or unconsciously choose. This sort of examination can shed light on usages of inclusive, gender-specific and masculine generic forms which are employed when describing women and men, for instance, in work settings. In this paper I investigate an online survey that examines attitudes to and beliefs about gendered terms and sexist language in Italian. Specifically, the speakers consulted were asked to answer closed questions as well as to provide explanations and comments on the issues raised – sexist and gendered language – particularly in relation to a gender imbalanced political public space. In terms of ethics, the survey exclusively collected information that contributed to the stratification of results based on age (5 age ranges), gender (“woman”, “man”, “I do want to disclose this information”) and native language (Italian or other). In the introduction to the survey, the respondents also specified whether they were familiar with academic studies or columns that deal with sexist language, as this could affect the understanding of and the answers to the usages of gender-specific forms long disregarded in Italian (e.g. ingegnera/engineer [feminine]). In the time that the survey was online, i.e. 5 months between May and September 2015, 178 users responded. I here present the quantitative results and discuss the qualitative insights provided by the users. These will be discussed in relation to dated guidelines (Sabatini, 1993) and up-to-date literature on Italian gendered and sexist language (Fusco, 2012; Mills, 2008; author, 2014, forthcoming). The survey is further contextualised within the timely, yet not enough vigorous, debate on sexist language in Italian, promoted by, among others, the Speaker of the Lower Chamber of the Italian Parliament, Laura Boldrini. The paper problematizes language in relation to the array of grammatical forms available: 1. feminine e.g. ministra (Minister, feminine); 2. Masculine or (sexist) generic, e.g. ministro (Minister, masculine). Together with these, I will explore other forms, to which attention has not been paid, more specifically: epicene forms, i.e. gender-free terms that turn gender specific with satellite elements (e.g. feminine/masculine articles, adjectives) – e.g. la/il presidente (the[feminine]/the[masculine] speaker, chair) – together with grammatically incorrect singular and plural terms – e.g. avvocatessa (lawyer [feminine]). This paper contributes to the debate on language prescriptivism and semantic derogation (Mills, 2008; Mills and Mullany, 2011) in grammatical gender languages as well as outlining the advantages and disadvantages of using surveys as a method of investigation.