Fanny Mondet

Fanny Mondet
French National Institute for Agriculture, Food, and Environment (INRAE) | INRAE · Abeilles et Environnement

PhD

About

87
Publications
33,487
Reads
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1,495
Citations
Citations since 2017
73 Research Items
1144 Citations
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Introduction
I currently work at the Abeilles et Environnement unit of INRAE (French National Institute for Agricultural Research). I do research on honey bee health, and more particularly I investigate host-parasite interactions between bees and varroa.
Additional affiliations
October 2014 - present
French National Institute for Agriculture, Food, and Environment (INRAE)
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Honey bee pathology
October 2011 - December 2014
University of Otago
Position
  • PhD Student
October 2011 - December 2014
French National Institute for Agriculture, Food, and Environment (INRAE)
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 2010 - September 2011
AgroParisTech
Field of study
  • Ecology
September 2009 - September 2011
AgroParisTech
Field of study
  • Environment and agriculture public policies
September 2006 - June 2009
Ecole normale supérieure de Lyon
Field of study
  • Biosciences

Publications

Publications (87)
Article
Full-text available
Background: Eusocial insects are crucial to many ecosystems, and particularly the honeybee (Apis mellifera). One approach to facilitate their study in molecular genetics, is to consider whole-colony genotyping by combining DNA of multiple individuals in a single pool sequencing experiment. Cheap and fast, this technique comes with the drawback of...
Article
Invasive parasites are major threats to biodiversity. The honey bee ectoparasite, Varroa destructor, has shifted host and spread almost globally several decades ago. This pest is generally considered to be the main global threat to Western honey bees, Apis mellifera, although the damages it causes are not equivalent in all its new host's population...
Article
Full-text available
EurBeST — A Pilot Study Testing Varroa-resistant Bees Under Commercial Beekeeping Conditions.
Article
Full-text available
In 1977, a sample of diseased adult honeybees ( Apis mellifera ) from Egypt was found to contain large amounts of a previously unknown virus, Egypt bee virus, which was subsequently shown to be serologically related to deformed wing virus (DWV). By sequencing the original isolate, we demonstrate that Egypt bee virus is in fact a fourth unique, majo...
Conference Paper
Eusocial insects, especially the honeybee (Apis mellifera), are major contributors to many ecosystems and face high levels of biotic and abiotic stress. Living in colonies the unit of interest, for phenotyping, is generally the group, making pool sequencing a relevant genomic tool for estimating genetic contributions. However, due to the multi-male...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Eusocial insects play a central role in many ecosystems, and particularly the important pollinator honeybee ( Apis mellifera ). One approach to facilitate their study in molecular genetics, is to consider whole colonies as single individuals by combining DNA of multiple individuals in a single pool sequencing experiment. Such a technique...
Method
Full-text available
EURBEST KSIĄŻKA METOD OCENY PSZCZELARZE PROWADZĄCY OCENĘ STACJONARNĄ PT Uzunov et., 2021
Article
Full-text available
The invasive mite Varroa destructor is identified as the main biotic cause of European honey bee colony losses in many regions, leading to systematic treatments of colonies every year in order to prevent colonies from collapsing. However, some colonies have been reported to survive in the absence of treatment. The ability of honey bee colonies to s...
Article
Full-text available
The parasitic Varroa destructor is considered a major pathogenic threat to honey bees and to beekeeping. Without regular treatment against this mite, honey bee colonies can collapse within a 2–3-year period in temperate climates. Beyond this dramatic scenario, Varroa induces reductions in colony performance, which can have significant economic impa...
Article
Full-text available
The identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) through genome‐wide association studies (GWAS) is a powerful method for unravelling the genetic background of selected traits and improving early‐stage predictions. In honey bees (Apis mellifera), past genetic analyses have particularly focused on individual queens and workers. In this study, we u...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species events related to globalization are increasing, resulting in parasitic outbreaks. Understanding of host defense mechanisms is needed to predict and mitigate against the consequences of parasite invasion. Using the honey bee Apis mellifera and the mite Varroa destructor, as a host–parasite model, we provide a comprehensive study of...
Article
Full-text available
Cell recapping is a behavioural trait of honeybees (Apis mellifera) where cells with developing pupae are uncapped, inspected, and then recapped, without removing the pupae. The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, unarguably the most destructive pest in apiculture world-wide, invades the cells of developing pupae to feed and reproduce. Honeybees...
Conference Paper
Characterizing the genetic diversity of populations allows to better understand their demographic history and their adaptation to selective pressures. Social insects, such as honeybee, live in colonies which ultimately are the relevant evolutionary and selective units for such species. However, performing large scale genetic analyses of honeybees i...
Article
Full-text available
Developing resistance to the varroa mite in honey bees is a major goal for apicultural science and practice, the development of selection strategies and the availability of resistant stock. Here we present an extended literature review and survey of resistant populations and selection programs in the EU and elsewhere, including expert interviews. W...
Article
Full-text available
In the fight against the Varroa destructor mite, selective breeding of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) populations that are resistant to the parasitic mite stands as a sustainable solution. Selection initiatives indicate that using the suppressed mite reproduction (SMR) trait as a selection criterion is a suitable tool to breed such resistant bee pop...
Article
Full-text available
In the current context of worldwide honey bee colony losses, among which the varroa mite plays a major role, the hope to improve honey bee health lies in part in the breeding of varroa resistant colonies. To do so, methods used to evaluate varroa resistance need better understanding. Repeatability and correlations between traits such as mite non-re...
Preprint
In the current context of worldwide honey bee colony losses, among which the varroa mite plays a major role, hope to improve honey bee health lies in part in the breeding of varroa resistant colonies. To do so, methods used to evaluate varroa resistance need better understanding. Repeatability and correlations between traits such as Mite Non-Reprod...
Article
Full-text available
Since its migration from the Asian honey bee (Apis cerana) to the European honey bee (Apis mellifera), the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor has emerged as a major issue for beekeeping worldwide. Due to a short history of coevolution, the host–parasite relationship between A. mellifera and V. destructor is unbalanced, with honey bees suffering i...
Article
Full-text available
The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is the most significant pathological threat to the western honey bee, Apis mellifera, leading to the death of most colonies if left untreated. An alternative approach to chemical treatments is to selectively enhance heritable honey bee traits of resistance or tolerance to the mite through breeding programs,...
Article
Full-text available
The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is the most significant pathological threat to the western honey bee, Apis mellifera, leading to the death of most colonies if left untreated. An alternative approach to chemical treatments is to selectively enhance heritable honey bee traits of resistance or tolerance to the mite through breeding programs,...
Article
Full-text available
The parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, has shaken the beekeeping and pollination industries since its spread from its native host, the Asian honey bee (Apis cerana), to the naïve European honey bee (Apis mellifera) used commercially for pollination and honey production around the globe. Varroa is the greatest threat to honey bee health. Worrying ob...
Preprint
Full-text available
The parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, has shaken the beekeeping and pollination industries since its spread from its native host, the Asian honey bee (Apis cerana), to the naïve European honey bee (A. mellifera) used commercially for pollination and honey production around the globe. Varroa is the greatest threat to honey bee health. Worrying obse...
Preprint
Full-text available
The parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, has shaken the beekeeping and pollination industries since its spread from its native host, the Asian honeybee (Apis cerana), to the naïve European honeybee (A. mellifera) used commercially for pollination and honey production around the globe. Varroa is the greatest threat to honeybee health. Worrying observa...
Conference Paper
Characterising the genetic diversity of populations allows to better understand their demographic history and their adaptation to selective pressures. In honey bees, this characterisation is facilitated by a relatively small genome size, but is hindered by the fact that often the unit of observation and sampling is the colony rather than a single i...
Article
Varroa destructor and its associated viruses, in particular deformed wing virus (DWV), have been identified as probable causes of honey bee (Apis mellif era L.) colony losses. Evidence suggests that elevated DWV titres in bees could compromise sensory and communication abilities resulting in negative consequences for hygienic behaviour. As antennae...
Article
Full-text available
The western honeybee Apis mellifera exhibits a diverse set of adaptations in response to infestations by its most virulent disease-causing agent, the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor. In this study, we investigated the effect of honeybee pupae genotype on the expression of four host and parasite traits that are associated with the reproductive...
Preprint
Full-text available
It was brought to our attention that a preprint version of a refutation to our paper titled “Rapid parallel evolution overcomes global honey bee parasite” was posted through PeerJ recently. This is our formal response to the refutation, which can be found through this link: https://peerj.com/preprints/27938/ Here we have broken down the arguments o...
Conference Paper
The mite Varroa destructor is known for causing devastating colony losses in the western honey bee, Apis mellifera. While chemical treatments are currently the norm in many countries, the most sustainable solution against this pest is to select and breed varroa-resistant honey bees. However, this solution is impeded by the difficulty to evaluate th...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Characterising the genetic diversity of populations allows to better understand their demographic history and their adaptation to selective pressures. In honey bees, this characterisation is facilitated by a relatively small genome size, but is hindered by the fact that often the unit of observation and sampling is the colony rather than a single i...
Article
Full-text available
The ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor, is the most severe biotic threat to honeybees (Apis mellifera) globally, usually causing colony death within a few years without treatments. While it is known that a few A. mellifera populations survive mite infestations by means of natural selection, the possible role of mite adaptations remains unclear....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Honey bees in Europe, Apis mellifera, are under the threat of Varroa destructor infestation. Three main phenotypes can be measured on the colony to inform on its resistance toward such infestation: varroa-sensitive hygiene (VSH), suppressed mite reproduction (SMR) and varroa mite infestation dynamic. The first, VSH, is related to a behaviour involv...
Article
Full-text available
In eusocial insect colonies nestmates cooperate to combat parasites, a trait called social immunity. However, social immunity failed for Western honey bees (Apis mellifera) when the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor switched hosts from Eastern honey bees (Apis cerana). This mite has since become the most severe threat to A. mellifera world-wide....
Article
Full-text available
Background: The parasite Varroa destructor represents a significant threat to honeybee colonies. Indeed, development of Varroa infestation within colonies, if left untreated, often leads to the death of the colony. Although its impact on bees has been extensively studied, less is known about its biology and the functional processes governing its a...
Article
Varroa destructor is a key contributor to honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colony losses that threaten global economies. Some colonies, especially those displaying high levels of hygiene behaviour targeted towards V. destructor-infested cells, survive mite infestation. Worker bees displaying varroa sensitive hygiene (VSH) open infested brood cells and...
Chapter
Full-text available
After varroa invaded Europe in the mid of twentieth century, a few populations of honeybee colonies have been found to survive the mite. This chapter describes the case of natural selection of honeybees in France against varroa. Different hypotheses have been tested to explain this phenomenon, such as resistance of the bees to the mite or to the as...
Method
Full-text available
Method of screening for suppressed mite reprodcution (SMR) and recapping of brood cells (REC) in European honey bees developed by members of Research Network for Sustainable Bee Breeding (RNSBB).
Book
After varroa invaded Europe in the mid of twentieth century, a few populations of honeybee colonies have been found to survive the mite. The chapter describes the case of natural selection of honeybees in France against varroa. Different hypotheses have been tested to explain this phenomenon, such as resistance of the bees to the mite or to associa...
Article
Full-text available
Social immunity forms an essential part of the defence repertoire of social insects. In response to infestation by the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its associated viruses, honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) have developed a specific behaviour (varroa-sensitive hygiene, or VSH) that helps protect the colony from this parasite. Brood cells heavil...
Article
Full-text available
article présenté lors du Colloque Abeilles, qui s’est tenu à Avignon le 15 novembre 2016.