Fabio Marson

Fabio Marson
Patrizio Paoletti Foundation for Development and Communication, Italy, Assisi · Research Institute for Neuroscience, Education and Didactics

Master of Science

About

18
Publications
1,754
Reads
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91
Citations
Introduction
Fabio Marson currently works at the Research Institute for Neuroscience, Education and Didactics in Italy (Assisi). Fabio does research in Cognitive Science and Neuroscience with a specific focus on embodied cognition and EEG. Currently, Fabio is focusing his research on the role of sensorimotor experience in modulation of cognitive functions and on the nature of conceptual representations in the framework of Embodied Cognition.
Additional affiliations
February 2018 - present
Patrizio Paoletti Foundation for Development and Communication
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • My researches are focused on electrophysiological correlates and of meditation and mindful motor trainings.
January 2015 - present
Sapienza University of Rome
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • My researches are focused on numerical cognition and spatial attention.
Education
October 2014 - July 2016
Sapienza University of Rome
Field of study
  • Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychological Rehabilitation
September 2011 - September 2014
Sapienza University of Rome
Field of study
  • Psichology & Health

Publications

Publications (18)
Chapter
Absorption, the ability to highly focus attention, as well as openness to self-altering experiences, is an important psychological construct, closely related to deep-meditation states and other altered states of consciousness. Yet, little is known about the electrophysiological profile of states of absorption, possibly due to the difficulty to indu...
Article
Full-text available
The Attentional-SNARC effect (Att-SNARC) originally described by Fischer et al. (Nat Neurosci 6(6):555, 2003), consists of faster RTs to visual targets in the left side of space when these are preceded by small-magnitude Arabic cues at central fixation and by faster RTs to targets in the right side of space when these are preceded by large-magnitud...
Article
Full-text available
Silence is an important aspect of various meditation practices, but little work has focused specifically on the underlying neurophysiology of silence-related meditative practice, and on how it relates to the self-reported experiences of practitioners. To expand current knowledge regarding the neurophenomenology of silence in meditation, we directly...
Article
Full-text available
Background and Objectives: Neurodegenerative diseases that typically affect the elderly such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and frontotemporal dementia are typically characterised by significant cognitive impairment that worsens significantly over time. To date, viable pharmacological options for the cognitive symptoms in these clinica...
Article
Humans are prone to mentally organise the ascending series of integers according to reading habits so that in western cultures small numbers are positioned to the left of larger ones on a mental number line. Despite 140 years since seminal observations by Sir Francis Galton (Galton, 1880a, b), the functional mechanisms that give rise to directional...
Article
Full-text available
It is debated whether the representation of numbers is endowed with a directional-spatial component so that perceiving small-magnitude numbers triggers leftward shifts of attention and perceiving large-magnitude numbers rightward shifts. Contrary to initial findings, recent investigations have demonstrated that centrally presented small-magnitude a...
Article
Full-text available
Psychophysical well-being can be supported during development by the integration of extra-curricular activities in scholastic settings. These activities can be implemented in different forms, ranging from physical activities to sitting meditation practices. Considering that both such activities are thought to affect children’s psychophysical develo...
Article
Full-text available
Most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis are heterogeneous in their clinical profiles and underlying pathophysiology, although they typically share the presence of cognitive impairment that worsens significantly during the course of the disease. Viable...
Article
Full-text available
Right brain-damaged patients with unilateral spatial neglect fail to explore the left side of space. Recent EEG and clinical evidence suggests that neglect patients might suffer deficits in predictive coding, i.e. in identifying and exploiting probabilistic associations among sensory stimuli in the environment. To gain direct insights on this issue...
Chapter
Full-text available
While it has been suggested that diagonal rhythmical bilateral movements promote improvement in motor and cognitive functions, no study that we are aware of has actually examined electrophysiological changes during diagonal movements. Therefore, we aimed to study cerebral activity during the performance of diagonal and vertical movements (DM and VM...
Article
Orienting of attention produces a “sensory gain” in the processing of visual targets at attended locations and an increase in the amplitude of target-related P1 and N1 ERPs. P1 marks gain reduction at unattended locations; N1 marks gain enhancement at attended ones. Lateral targets that are preceded by valid cues also evoke a larger P1 over the hem...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Quadrato Motor Training (QMT) is a mindful movement practice in which the participant is required to move within a Square, according to a specific sequence of instructions. The QMT requires a high level of attention divided between the body and the Quadrato space, as well as silent waiting for the next instruction. Previous studies showed that QMT...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Studies suggest that consonant and dissonant sounds are processed differently during the first stage of auditory perception. In the current study, we aimed at examining the electrophysiological brain activity related to auditory processing, focusing on what happens when we perceive consonant and dissonant sounds compared to when we categorize such...
Preprint
Full-text available
Humans are prone to mentally organise the ascending series of integers according to reading habits, so that in western cultures small numbers are positioned to the left of larger ones on a mental number line (MNL, Dehaene et al., 1993). Despite 140 years since seminal observations made by Sir Francis Galton in human observers that experienced vivid...
Article
In a series of five experiments with unimanual Go/No-Go tasks and intermixed Arabic numerical, i.e. numbers lower or higher than 5, and directional targets, i.e. arrows pointing to the left or to the right, we explored whether spatial codes used in isolation inherently evoke the left-to-right representation of number magnitudes, i.e. Space-to-Numbe...
Article
We have recently demonstrated that when endogenous orienting of spatial attention is guided by central directional cues that reliably predict the position of lateral targets, Pupil Dilation (PDil) is higher as compared with directional cues that do not predict target position. These findings were interpreted as reflecting different levels of Locus...
Article
Over the last few years, several studies have investigated the possible effects of mindfulness meditation on time perception. Mindfulness meditation has been linked to both longer time production (TP) and increased bodily perception, and bodily processes are in turn thought to lie at the core of human time perception. Nevertheless, the connection b...
Preprint
Full-text available
In a series of recent studies we have pointed out that the use of contrasting left/right spatial codes, whether indirectly related to number magnitudes through response selection or directly associated to the same magnitudes to guide their spatial positioning on a mental number line, is crucial in eliciting space-number associations (Aiello, 2012;...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Hello ResearchGate community,
I am having troubles with the computing of "connectivity1" feature in LORETA.
I have a dataset extracted from MatLab in *.txt format that I want to analyze using the LORETA software. Dataset includes 22 txt file (11 subjects x 2 conditions) and each txt is composed by 1000 datapoints x 30 electrodes.
When I try to compute lagged coherence in "connectivity1" using "delta, theta, alpha, beta1, beta2, beta3 and gamma" as frequency bands it doesn't work and it gives me this prompt:
Singular Hermitian ROI 6*6 (conn57). Few EEGs or band too narrow, maybe?). Aborting!
I tried to perform analysis on each single txt separately in order to understand whether this error is related to specific subject or condition.
In fact, it came out that this error is related to specific subjects but the data format of the non-working file is absolutely the same as other subjects on which computing worked well.
I have no idea of what could lead to such an error and google didn't help. Does anybody has suggestion or advice on how to overcome this issue?
Thanks,
Fabio

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