Fabien L. Condamine

Fabien L. Condamine
French National Centre for Scientific Research | CNRS · Institut des Sciences de l'Evolution

Dr.

About

151
Publications
69,264
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Introduction
I study macroevolution with phylogenies and fossils. I did my PhD at the CBGP (Montpellier) with Gael Kergoat and Jean-Yves Rasplus. I did a first post-doc at the Ecole Polytechnique (CNRS) with Hélène Morlon, a second post-doc at the University of Gothenburg with Alexandre Antonelli. I then obtained a Marie Curie IOF grant with Felix Sperling (University of Alberta) and Isabel Sanmartín (CSIC). I am now a Research scientist at the CNRS (Institut des Sciences de l'Evolution, Montpellier).
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - present
French National Centre for Scientific Research
Position
  • Researcher
February 2015 - December 2015
University of Alberta
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2014 - January 2015
University of Gothenburg
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (151)
Article
Deciphering the timing of lineage diversification and extinction has greatly benefited in the last decade from methodological developments in fossil-based analyses. If these advances are increasingly used to study the past dynamics of vertebrates, other taxa such as insects remain relatively neglected. Our understanding of how insect clades waxed a...
Preprint
Butterflies are a diverse and charismatic insect group that are thought to have diversified via coevolution with plants and in response to dispersals following key geological events. These hypotheses have been poorly tested at the macroevolutionary scale because a comprehensive phylogenetic framework and datasets on global distributions and larval...
Preprint
Full-text available
A bstract Wild silkmoths (Saturniidae) are one of the most emblematic and most studied families of moths. Yet, the absence of a robust phylogenetic framework based on a comprehensive taxonomic sampling impedes our understanding of their evolutionary history. We analyzed 1,024 ultraconserved elements (UCEs) and their flanking regions to infer the re...
Article
Full-text available
A new specimen of the species Litholingia rhora Ren, 2002, from the Middle-Upper Jurassic deposit of Daohugou, is used to redescribe the species and precise its diagnosis. We also propose a series of wing venation drawings highlighting the main characteristics of the wing venation all Litholingia species. Finally, we summarize the current diversity...
Article
A new genus and species of stonefly is described and figured from the mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber as †Burmaperla pouilloni Jouault & Nel gen. et sp. nov. The placement of this new genus and species within the Perlidae is corroborated by an in-depth comparison of apomorphies. This new species differs from all other Acroneuriinae from the mid-Cretac...
Article
Full-text available
The Andes are the world's most biodiverse mountain chain, encompassing a complex array of ecosystems from tropical rainforests to alpine habitats. We provide a synthesis of Andean vascular plant diversity by estimating a list of all species with publicly available records, which we integrate with a phylogenetic dataset of 14 501 Neotropical plant s...
Article
Mountainous areas host a disproportionately large fraction of Earth's biodiversity, suggesting a causal relationship between mountain building and biological diversification. Mountain clade radiations are generally associated with changes in environment, climate, and the increase in heterogeneity therein during mountain building. However, examining...
Preprint
The Eocene--Oligocene transition (EOT) represents a period of global environmental changes particularly marked in Europe and coincides with a dramatic biotic turnover. Here, using an exceptional fossil preservation, we document and analyse the diversity dynamics of a mammal clade, Cainotherioidea (Artiodactyla), that survived the EOT and radiated r...
Article
Full-text available
The global increase in species richness toward the tropics across continents and taxonomic groups, referred to as the latitudinal diversity gradient, stimulated the formulation of many hypotheses to explain the underlying mechanisms of this pattern. We evaluate several of these hypotheses to explain spatial diversity patterns in a butterfly family,...
Article
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In the paper ‘A new stonefly species (Plecoptera: Perlodidae) from Eocene Baltic amber and questions on the wing venation potential for species diagnostic of fossil Plecoptera’, we figured and discussed on a specimen of the plecopteran Pteroliriope sinitshenkovae Cui, Béthoux, Kondratieff, Shih & Ren, 2016 (Jouault et al., 2021: figs 5–6), under th...
Article
Full-text available
Mountain systems harbor a substantial fraction of global biodiversity and, thus, provide excellent opportunities to study rapid diversification and to understand the historical processes underlying the assembly of biodiversity hotspots. The rich biodiversity in mountains is widely regarded as having arisen under the influence of geological and clim...
Article
Full-text available
Assessing the relative importance of geographical and ecological drivers of evolution is paramount to understand the diversification of species and traits at the macroevolutionary scale. Here, we use an integrative approach, combining phylogenetics, biogeography, ecology, and quantified phenotypes to investigate the drivers of both species and phen...
Article
It is striking to observe that species richness is not evenly distributed across the surface of the planet. Current species diversity indeed decreases toward the poles, with Antarctica for instance being depauperate compared to tropical regions. This ubiquitous pattern has long attracted the attention of naturalists and more recently of evolutionar...
Article
Full-text available
Examination of Baltic amber Plecoptera reveals a new species of Isoperla: Isoperla baltica sp. nov. The placement of this new species is supported by an in-depth comparison of apomorphies supporting families, subfamilies, and suborders. Contrary to previous descriptions of many fossil species, we took advantage of the good preservation of the genit...
Article
Full-text available
The question why non-avian dinosaurs went extinct 66 million years ago (Ma) remains unresolved because of the coarseness of the fossil record. A sudden extinction caused by an asteroid is the most accepted hypothesis but it is debated whether dinosaurs were in decline or not before the impact. We analyse the speciation-extinction dynamics for six k...
Article
The Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT) represents a period of global environmental changes particularly marked in Europe and coincides with a dramatic biotic turnover. Here, using an exceptional fossil preservation, we document and analyse the diversity dynamics of a mammal clade, Cai-notherioidea (Artiodactyla), that survived the EOT and radiated r...
Article
Aim Sea-level changes have long been put forward to explain the colonization of Southeast Asian islands by freshwater aquatic organisms. We examined the relative impact of Sundaland geology since the Oligocene and of Pleistocene Eustatic Fluctuations on the mitochondrial lineage diversification of a species-rich subfamily of freshwater fishes widel...
Preprint
Full-text available
Mountainous areas host a disproportionately large fraction of Earth’s biodiversity, suggesting a causal relationship between mountain building and biological diversification. Mountain clade radiations are generally associated with environmental heterogeneity, and with ecological opportunities created during the formation of high-elevation habitats....
Preprint
Full-text available
Assessing the relative importance of geographical and ecological drivers of evolution is paramount to understand the diversification of species and traits at the macroevolutionary scale. Here, we use an integrative approach, combining phylogenetics, biogeography, ecology, and quantified phenotypes to investigate the drivers of both species and phen...
Preprint
Full-text available
The origin of the outstanding Neotropical biodiversity is still debated. A comprehensive understanding is hindered by the lack of deep-time comparative data across wide phylogenetic and ecological contexts. Here we define and evaluate four evolutionary scenarios assuming different diversity trajectories and drivers of Neotropical diversification. R...
Article
Full-text available
The mega-diversity of herbivorous insects is attributed to their co-evolutionary associations with plants. Despite abundant studies on insect-plant interactions, we do not know whether host-plant shifts have impacted both genomic adaptation and species diversification over geological times. We show that the antagonistic insect-plant interaction bet...
Article
Full-text available
Competition among species and entire clades can impact species diversification and extinction, which can shape macroevolutionary patterns. The fossil record shows successive biotic turnovers such that a dominant group is replaced by another. One striking example involves the decline of gymnosperms and the rapid diversification and ecological domina...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the biogeographical and diversification processes explaining current diversity patterns of subcosmopolitan-distributed groups is challenging. We aimed at disentangling the historical biogeography of the subcosmopolitan liverwort genus Lejeunea with estimation of ancestral areas of origin and testing if sexual system and palaeotemperat...
Preprint
Full-text available
The exuberant proliferation of herbivorous insects is attributed to their associations with plants. Despite abundant studies on insect-plant interactions, we do not know whether host-plant shifts have impacted both genomic adaptation and species diversification over geological times. We show that the antagonistic insect-plant interaction between sw...
Article
Full-text available
The comment by Gamisch (2020) draws the attention of users of the R‐package RPANDA (Methods Ecol. Evol., 7, 2016, 589) on situations when properly interpreting the results of linear diversification dependencies requires caution. Here we provide clarifications to help users interpreting their results when using any type of functional diversification...
Article
Full-text available
Losaria coon (Fabricius, 1793) is currently comprised of ten subspecies, which were originally described under two names, Papilio coon and P. doubledayi before 1909, when they were combined as one species. The main difference between them is the colour of abdomen and hindwing subterminal spots—yellow in coon and red in doubledayi. Wing morphology,...
Article
Full-text available
Aim The Neotropics currently host outstanding levels of species richness, with one‐third of the global tetrapod species. The underlying causes of these extraordinary levels of biodiversity are a topic debated in evolutionary ecology, but the main processes at work remain elusive. Location Neotropics. Time period Cenozoic and Mesozoic. Major taxa...
Article
Full-text available
Three Graphium species belonging to two species groups of the subgenus Pazala, the alebion and tamerlanus groups, were examined in molecular and morphological studies, and their female genitalia are reported for the first time. Their relationship with other species groups within the subgenus is assessed and their divergence times are estimated. We...
Article
Dans les Néotropiques comme ailleurs, la biodiversité actuelle résulte d’un équilibre entre apparition et disparition d’espèces au cours du temps (balance spéciation/extinction). Cette biodiversité témoigne aussi des phases successives d’immigration de nouvelles espèces depuis les régions adjacentes ou des zones plus éloignées, sous l’effet de phén...
Cover Page
The issue is mostly devoted to Neotropical mammals, with original drawings by Mazan and a bunch of nice articles (interchanges, evolution, megafauna, and Caribbean mammals), original illustrations, fantastic drawings by Mazan, and photographs (notably by Antoine Baglan, Quentin Martinez, and Nathan Upham)!
Article
Variations of speciation and extinction rates determine the fate of clades through time. Periods of high diversification and extinction (possibly mass‐extinction events) can punctuate the evolutionary history of various clades, but they remain loosely defined for many biological groups, especially nonmarine invertebrates like insects. Here, we exam...
Article
Understanding heterogeneity in species richness between closely related clades is a key research question in ecology and evolutionary biology. Multiple hypotheses have been proposed to interpret such diversity contrasts across the tree of life, with most studies focusing on speciation rates to explain clades’ evolutionary radiations, while often ne...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Abiotic factors such as global temperature or continental fragmentation may favour speciation through the ecological and geographical isolation of lineages, but macroevolutionary quantifications of such effect with both fossil and phylogenetic data are rarely performed. Here, we propose to use biogeographical estimations and palaeo‐environmenta...
Article
Full-text available
The Graphium (Pazala) mandarinus group was recently defined and the status of taxa as well as the number of species was revised. We report here the discovery of a new species from Kon Tum plateau of the Truong Son (Annamite) Range of Central Vietnam, which we describe based on morphological and molecular evidence. Molecular phylogeny shows that the...
Article
The convergent evolution of analogous features is an evolutionary process occurring independently across the tree of life. From the evolution of echolocation, prehensile tail, viviparity or winged flight, environmental factors often drive this astonishing phenomenon. However, convergent evolution is not always conspicuous or easily identified. Gian...
Article
Evolutionary relationships have remained unresolved in many well-studied groups, even though advances in next-generation sequencing and analysis, using approaches such as transcriptomics, anchored hybrid enrichment, or ultraconserved elements, have brought systematics to the brink of whole genome phylogenomics. Recently, it has become possible to s...
Article
Full-text available
The rise of Neogene C 4 grasslands is one of the most drastic changes recently experienced by the biosphere. A central-and widely debated-hypothesis posits that Neogene grasslands acted as a major adaptive zone for herbivore lineages. We test this hypothesis with a novel model system, the Sesamiina stemborer moths and their associated host-grasses....
Article
Widely known for pest species that include major modulators of temperate forests, the genus Choristoneura is part of the species‐rich tribe Archipini of leafroller moths (Tortricidae). Delimitation of the genus has remained unresolved because no phylogeny has included species endemic to Africa and studies have often omitted the type species of the...
Conference Paper
Choristoneura species are well known as temperate forest pests, but delimitation of the genus has remained unresolved. Taxonomic confusion increased when Archips occidentalis (Walsingham) was transferred to Choristoneura, creating a homonym with Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman. We reconstructed a phylogeny using DNA for mitochondrial COI and nuc...
Article
Full-text available
The previously recognised closely related species Graphium (Pazala) mandarinus (Oberthür, 1879) and G. (P.) sichuanica (Koiwaya, 1993) are shown to comprise seven species as a result of both molecular and morphological analysis. Molecular dating analysis is also performed on the mandarinus group in order to investigate the divergence time of the ta...
Article
Full-text available
The American tropics (the Neotropics) are the most species-rich realm on Earth, and for centuries, scientists have attempted to understand the origins and evolution of their biodiversity. It is now clear that different regions and taxonomic groups have responded differently to geological and climatic changes. However, we still lack a basic understa...
Article
Mountainous areas contain a substantial part of the world species richness, but the evolutionary origins and diversification of this biodiversity remain elusive. Diversification may result from differences in clade age (longer time to diversify), net diversification rates (faster speciation rate) or carrying capacities (number of niches). The likel...
Article
Swallowtail butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) have been instrumental in understanding many foundational concepts in biology; despite this, a resolved and robust phylogeny of the group has been a major impediment to elucidating patterns and processes of their ecological and evolutionary history. This study presents a mitogenomic, time-calibrat...
Article
Eusociality, Darwin's special difficulty, has been widely investigated but remains a topic of great debate in organismal biology. Eusocial species challenge existing theories, and the impact of highly integrated societies on diversification dynamics is controversial with opposing assertions and hypotheses in the literature. Here, using phylogenetic...
Article
Full-text available
In macroevolution, the Red Queen (RQ) model posits that biodiversity dynamics depend mainly on species-intrinsic biotic factors such as interactions among species or life-history traits, while the Court Jester (CJ) model states that extrinsic environmental abiotic factors have a stronger role. Until recently, a lack of relevant methodological appro...
Article
Full-text available
The aim was to determine processes driving the latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG) in New World swallowtail butterfly diversity. We tested three mechanisms commonly invoked to explain the LDG: ecological opportunity, evolutionary rates and biogeographical history. New World and Eurasia. Oligocene–Present. New World swallowtail butterfly clade (Pap...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental sex determination (ESD) − a change in sexual function during an individual life span driven by environmental cues − is an exceedingly rare sexual system among angiosperms. Because ESD can directly affect reproduction success, it could influence diversification rate as compared with lineages that have alternative reproductive systems....
Preprint
Full-text available
In macroevolution, the Red Queen (RQ) model posits that biodiversity dynamics depend mainly on species-intrinsic biotic factors such as interactions among species or life-history traits, while the Court Jester (CJ) model states that extrinsic environmental abiotic factors have a stronger role. Until recently, a lack of relevant methodological appro...
Article
Full-text available
Karst ecosystems in southern China are species-rich and have high levels of endemism, yet little is known regarding the evolutionary processes responsible for the origin and diversification of karst biodiversity. The genus Primulina (Gesneriaceae) comprises ca. 170 species endemic to southern China with high levels of ecological (edaphic) specializ...
Preprint
Full-text available
Environmental sex determination (ESD) a change in sexual function during an individual life span driven by environmental cues is an exceedingly rare sexual system among angiosperms. Because ESD can directly affect reproduction success, it could influence diversification rate as compared with lineages that have alternative mating systems. Here we te...
Article
Full-text available
The Andean uplift is one of the major orographic events in the New World and has impacted considerably the diversification of numerous Neotropical lineages. Despite its importance for biogeography, the specific role of mountain ranges as a dispersal barrier between South and Central American lowland plant lineages is still poorly understood. The sw...