Ewa Krzyszczyk

Ewa Krzyszczyk
Bangor University · School of Natural Sciences

PhD

About

27
Publications
24,661
Reads
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446
Citations
Citations since 2016
19 Research Items
409 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
Additional affiliations
May 2016 - August 2016
Broadreach
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • I taught undergraduate students about shark physiology, habitats, conservation, and myths. More importantly I taught students how to scuba dive with sharks while collecting data for their own research projects. Students received college credit.
September 2013 - September 2016
Georgetown University
Position
  • Senior Researcher

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
The quantity and quality of individual social relationships is a fundamental feature of social structure for group-living species. In many species, individuals preferentially associate with close relatives, which can amplify social benefits through inclusive fitness. Reproductive variation, dispersal and other factors may nevertheless impact relati...
Article
Full-text available
Resource competition among conspecifics is central to social evolution, as it serves as one of the primary selective pressures of group living. This is because the degree of competition for resources impacts the costs and benefits of social interactions. Despite this, how heterogeneity in resource competition drives variation in the type and quanti...
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Full-text available
[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1098/rsos.170641.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1098/rsos.170641.].
Article
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Behavioral phenotypic traits or “animal personalities” drive critical evolutionary processes such as fitness, disease and information spread. Yet the stabilit y of behavioral traits, essential by definition, has rarely been measured over developmentally significant periods of time, limiting our understanding of how behavioral stability interacts wi...
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Full-text available
As demands for wildlife tourism increase, provisioning has become a popular means of providing up-close viewing to the public. At Monkey Mia, Shark Bay, Australia, up to five adult female Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins ( Tursiops aduncus ) visit a 100 m stretch of beach daily to receive fish handouts. In 2011, a severe marine heatwave (MHW) devas...
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The juvenile period is a challenging life-history stage, especially in species with a high degree of fission-fusion dynamics, such as bottlenose dolphins, where maternal protection is virtually absent. Here, we examined how juvenile male and female bot-tlenose dolphins navigate this vulnerable period. Specifically, we examined their grouping patter...
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Social behavior is an important driver of infection dynamics, though identifying the social interactions that foster infectious disease transmission is challenging. Here we examine how social behavior impacts disease transmission in Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) using an easily identifiable skin disease and social network data...
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Direct pathogen and parasite transmission is fundamentally driven by a population’s contact network structure and its demographic composition and is further modulated by pathogen life-history traits. Importantly, populations are most often concurrently exposed to a suite of pathogens, which is rarely investigated, because contact networks are typic...
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Social living brings competition over mates, relationships, and resources, which can translate to direct conflict. In dolphins, tooth rakes received from conspecifics are highly visible and reliable indicators of conflict. New rakes indicate recent conflicts while healed rakes suggest older instances of conflict. Here, we investigate the healing ti...
Article
Reproductive senescence is evident across many mammalian species. An emerging perspective considers components of reproductive senescence as evolutionarily distinct phenomena: fertility senescence and maternal-effect senescence. While fertility senescence is regarded as the ageing of reproductive physiology, maternal-effect senescence pertains to t...
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Maternal care varies across taxa from brief, minimal care to long-term, intensive care. Mammalian mothers provide extensive and energetically expensive care by definition through pregnancy and lactation, which can extend for years, resulting in behavioural trade-offs between resource acquisition and direct care. In marine environments, mammalian mo...
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Sexual segregation is widespread in mammals, although the proximate causes are poorly understood in monomorphic species. Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus), which exhibit a high degree of fission–fusion dynamics, offer a useful lens to examine the ecological and social drivers of sexual segregation. While ecological hypotheses sugg...
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Entanglement in marine debris has become a serious matter for marine fauna, yet most data come from deceased animals. Here we studied a non-lethal entanglement event involving a female juvenile bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus), known as EDE, in Shark Bay, Western Australia who has been monitored and observed since birth as part of a long-term...
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In fission-fusion societies, group size and composition change dynamically, reflecting social preferences and pressures. Most notably during reproduction, intersexual group dynamics reflect a balance between female choice for optimal mates and male competition for mating access. In systems where males and females remain in their natal area for life...
Article
Long-term studies often rely on natural markings for individual identification across time. The primary method for identification in small cetaceans relies on dorsal fin shape, scars, and other natural markings. However, dorsal fin markings can vary substantially over time and the dorsal fin can become unrecognizable after an encounter with a boat...
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Full-text available
Electronic supplementary material is available online at https://dx. Animal sociality is of significant interest to evolutionary and behavioural ecologists, with efforts focused on the patterns, causes and fitness outcomes of social preference. However, individual social patterns are the consequence of both attraction to (preference for) and avoida...
Data
Figure of two dolphins utilisation distributions and randomised spatial positions; Figure of daily MCPs; Correlations of home range overlap generated with increasing numbers of sightings per individual
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Sex differences in adult behaviour are well documented, but less is known about the ontogeny of these differences. In mammals, the transition to independence, from infancy to the juvenile period, is when these sex differences are likely to become prominent. Here, we examined sex differences in behavioural development among calf and juvenile bottlen...
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Sexual coercion results from extreme conflict over mating. As a male strategy to overcome female resistance, coercion can impose fitness costs on females. Among mammals, most cases involve single males or temporary coalitions, with allied aggression towards females being rare. Among Shark Bay bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops cf. aduncus, male alliance...
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Network null models are important to drawing conclusions about individual- and population-(or graph) level metrics. While the null models of binary networks are well studied, recent literature on weighted networks suggests that: (1) many so-called ‘weighted metrics’ do not actually depend on weights, and (2) many metrics that supposedly measure hig...
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Effective foraging is necessary for nearly all animals, but most animals are not born with adult-like foraging performance. Instead, foraging skills are developed during an individual’s lifetime. Life-history theory predicts that adult-level foraging performance should be reached prior to the start of reproduction, but for most species, we know lit...
Article
Activity budget data are essential for determining behavioral responses to physiological and ecological variables. Yet, few studies are available to investigate the robustness, accuracy, and biases of the methods used to estimate activity budgets for cetaceans. In this study, we compare activity budgets of 55 adult female bottlenose dolphins in Sha...
Article
To date, color patterns have been used to assess cetacean age and taxonomic status, but few studies have determined precise correlates of coloration with known age or investigated its function. Here, we examine the ontogeny of speckling in 88 bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) in Shark Bay, Australia, of known age, tracked from birth to age 34. Ven...
Data
Mitochondrial DNA profile of blow and blood from individuals 4 to 6. For ease of presentation we only show an 80 base pair long fragment (178 bp-255 bp) of the 434 base pair long sequence for three out of the six individuals. The remaining three DNA profiles are available on the online supporting material Figure S2. Additionally, the full sequences...
Data
Microsatellite DNA profile of blow and blood from the remaining 5 individuals. The top 3 panels represent the three microsatellite loci amplified from DNA extracted from blow. The 3 lower panels represent the three microsatellite loci amplified from DNA extracted from blood. The microsatellite locus lobs_Di21 is coloured green. The microsatellite l...
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Full-text available
Molecular tools are now widely used to address crucial management and conservation questions. To date, dart biopsying has been the most commonly used method for collecting genetic data from cetaceans; however, this method has some drawbacks. Dart biopsying is considered inappropriate for young animals and has recently come under scrutiny from ethic...

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