Evgeny Rybin

Evgeny Rybin
Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography of Siberian Branch Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia · Stone Age Archaeology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

93
Publications
22,626
Reads
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822
Citations
Citations since 2016
56 Research Items
638 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
Additional affiliations
January 2015 - present
Altai State University
Position
  • Senior Researcher
January 1997 - February 2020

Publications

Publications (93)
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the formation processes of combustion features at the Orkhon 7 Paleolithic site in central Mongolia, employing a new multifaceted approach that combines spatial analysis with computer learning and micro-charcoal analysis. We analyzed material from excavations conducted in the 1980s (Archaeological Horizon 3 in Pits 2 and 3) an...
Article
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Central Asia is positioned at a crossroads linking several zones important to hominin dispersal during the Middle Pleistocene. However, the scarcity of stratified and dated archaeological material and paleoclimate records makes it difficult to understand dispersal and occupation dynamics during this time period, especially in arid zones. Here we co...
Article
Full-text available
Beginning in the Middle Palaeolithic, human populations penetrated areas of Central Asia that are today characterised by extremely arid conditions. Mongolia's Gobi Desert comprises one such region. Tsagaan Agui Cave presents an example of the later Pleistocene occupation of this area, containing stratified evidence of diachronic, intense human and...
Article
Upper Palaeolithic microlithic complexes in Northeast Asia are usually included in the spectrum of non-geometric industries. Mongolia, which is considered a possible crossroads of Middle and Upper Paleolithic migration routes due to its environmental and geographic conditions, is the only exception in this vast region. The Tolbor cluster of sites i...
Article
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Throughout the arid lands of Africa and Eurasia, camelids facilitated the expansion of human populations into areas that would not likely have been habitable without the transportation abilities of this animal along with the organic resources it provides, including dung, meat, milk, leather, wool, and bones. The two-humped, Bactrian, species of Cam...
Article
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Here, we present initial results of a new course of research being carried out at the Moiltyn-am, Orkhon-1, and Orkhon-7 Paleolithic sites in the Orkhon River Valley, central Mongolia. Our research focuses on the Moiltyn-am site, which preserves a cultural and chronological sequence from the Final Middle to the Late Upper Paleolithic. Results from...
Article
The Early Upper Palaeolithic bone industry of the Central Altai, Russia: new evidence from the Kara-Bom site - Natalia E. Belousova, Alexander Yu. Fedorchenko, Evgeny P. Rybin, Maxim V. Seletskiy, Samantha Brown, Katerina Douka, Tom Higham
Article
Full-text available
In Central and East Asia, the Upper Paleolithic dates as early as 45 ka cal BP, but until recently, there was little reliable information concerning human occupation during the following period, between 45 and 40 ka cal BP. Here we present results of the excavation of the site of Tolbor-21, in the Selenga drainage system, Northern Mongolia. We focu...
Article
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Little is known about the acquisition and transport of rare or “exotic” raw materials in the Initial Upper Paleolithic (IUP). A recently discovered perforated muscovite (mica) flakelet at the Kharganyn Gol 5 site in the middle Selenga Basin of Mongolia raises the question of how far ancient humans ranged to access this material. Here, we present th...
Article
E. P. Rybin, A. M. Khatsenovich The Mystery of Makarovo Stratum: the Earliest Upper Palaeolithic in Eurasia or a Cis-Baikalian Type of the Initial Upper Palaeolithic Technocomplex of MIS-3 Time? Palaeolithic of Cis-Baikal includes regional chronostratigraphic unit, called “Makarovo stratum”. It includes redeposited artifact assemblages with modifie...
Article
Full-text available
Situated on the eastern periphery of Central Asia, Mongolia was a potentially important pathway for the migration of paleopopulations from the west to the east (and/or vice versa). Possible scenarios for the dispersal of ancient human populations in Mongolia are much more complicated than we initially supposed, due to the limited number of corridor...
Article
Archaeological sites with unclear conditions of sediment accumulation and stratigraphic disturbances are always complicated to research. Usually other sites in the region with better preservation of cultural layers helps to understand and divide them into cultural chronological stages. However lack of such sites results in the need to find other ap...
Article
Palaeolithic of Cis-Baikal includes regional chronostratigraphic unit, called "Makarovo stratum". It includes redeposited artifact assemblages with modified surface resulted from aeolian impact. It has been supposed earlier that paleogeographical conditions provoking aeolian corrasion of the artifact surfaces took place during the Murukta stadial (...
Article
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The fossil record suggests that at least two major human dispersals occurred across the Eurasian steppe during the Late Pleistocene. Neanderthals and Modern Humans moved eastward into Central Asia, a region intermittently occupied by the enigmatic Denisovans. Genetic data indicates that the Denisovans interbred with Neanderthals near the Altai Moun...
Article
Full-text available
Well-stratified Middle Palaeolithic assemblages are extremely rare in Mongolia. Initially investigated between the 1960s and 1990s, three major Middle Palaeolithic sites in the Orkhon Valley of central Mongolia yielded a large quantity of data and generated many research questions that still await answers. Re-investigation of these sites has uncove...
Article
The article presents the results of a new research cycle devoted to the reconstruction of stone raw material treatment strategies in the early stages of the Kara-Bomian tradition in Gorny Altai. The study was based on the analysis of materials from the cultural horizon UP2 of the Kara-Bom site (50,000-45,000 yrs cal BP). The study of the industry s...
Article
Recent investigations have highlighted an Asian variant of the so-called Initial Upper Paleolithic (IUP) broadly comparable in age and material culture to techno-complexes further to the west, but also showing distinct derived features. Here, we describe and provide corroborating evidence for another distinct technology employed in the Initial Uppe...
Article
Full-text available
New archaeological investigations at the key Palaeolithic Russian site of Kara-Bom have further characterised its stratigraphy through analysis of the rich lithic complex recovered. This evidence both complements and supplements our understanding of central and northern Asian Initial Upper Palaeolithic populations.
Article
Purpose. Recent investigations have highlighted an Asian variant of the so-called Initial Upper Paleolithic (IUP) broadly comparable in age and material culture to techno-complexes further to the west, but also showing distinct derived features. Several principal common technological features characterize the IUP in East Asia. The main targeted pro...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The problem of cultural and genetic relationships in the Upper Paleolithic of Trans-Baikal and Northern Mongolia is directly related to the stages of settlement of these territories. Critical review of the Siberian and Mongolian records revealed that the IkhTulberiin-Gol (Tolbor) Valley in Mongolia has a most densest concentration of stratified sit...
Article
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The territories of modern Mongolia, China and Transbaikalia were inhabited by Struthio asiaticus (Asian ostrich) during the Pleistocene. That species had become extinct there by the Early – Middle Holocene boundary, but had shared its home range with early modern humans, which there is a limited evidence suggesting their active use of ostrich eggsh...
Article
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Situated between the Altai Mountains and the Chinese Loess Plateau, the current territory of Mongolia played a pivotal role in Pleistocene human population dynamics in Northeast Asia with archaeological evidence suggesting the existence of cultural links with southern Siberia beginning in the Late Pleistocene. Here, we present preliminary results f...
Poster
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Upper Paleolithic complexes of Northern Mongolia are chronologically determined, and represent the cultural sequence with changes, which could be stemmed from gradual evolution as well as migrations of population. The Late Upper Paleolithic was preceded by chronostratigraphic lacuna in 26 – 16 kya, when no one unequivocal evidence of human presence...
Article
Initial Upper Palaeolithic industries of South Siberia and Central Asia are dated to 35,000—50,000 14C years BP. They have been identified in Russian Altai, Eastern Kazakhstan, Transbaikalia, Mongolia, Dzungaria and Ordos in the north of China. This paper deals with the materials from Mountain Altai (Kara-Bom and Ust-Karakol 1), Eastern Kazakhstan...
Article
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The Afontova Gora II archaeological site located within two geologically and geomorphically different areas has been studied in terms of geology and Quaternary deposition history. Both areas lie upon alluvial terrace II of the Yensei River. At the time when terrace I alluvium was deposited, aeolian and slope-wash facies accumulated on the surface o...
Article
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Выявлено геологическое строение и построена генерализованная модель формирования четвертичных отложений археологического памятника Афонтова гора-II на участках с различными геолого-геоморфологическими особенностями. Показано, что основанием для обоих участков служат аллювиальные отложения II надпойменной террасы (НПТ) р. Енисей. На них во время фор...
Article
Initial Upper Palaeolithic industries of South Siberia and Central Asia are dated to 35,000-50,000 ¹⁴C years BP. They have been identified in Russian Altai, Eastern Kazakhstan, Transbaikalia, Mongolia, Dzungaria and Ordos in the north of China. This paper deals with the materials from Mountain Altai (Kara-Bom and Ust-Karakol 1), Eastern Kazakhstan...
Article
Full-text available
Afontova Gora II is a Late Palaeolithic site dated between 15000 and 11000 years BP. The archaeological material is typical for the Afontova culture. The lithic industry is characterized by pebble tools and sidescrapers, as well as narrow-front and wedge-shaped microcores associated with microblade production. Raw material is dominated by small and...
Article
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Basin of the Selenga River with tributaries was one of the most occupied region in the Paleolithic of Central Asia. The recent geochemical and petrographic research indicated that rock mass of high-quality cherts from Permian strata crosses the right tributaries of Selenga. More than 70 Paleolithic occurrences are known in the local valleys of the...
Article
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In the Northern Hemisphere, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) is recognized as a cold and dry period that marks the maximum southward extension of the Scandinavian Inlands in Europe. In Asia, the ice sheet did not expand from the Arctic into Siberia, yet the LGM had a significant impact at high latitudes and elevations, as well as in regions with a co...
Article
This paper is devoted to results of the excavation of multilayer Paleolithic site Tolbor-21 in Northern Mongolia. Site is located in the right tributary of Selenga River, in Ikh-Tulberiin-Gol River valley. Site was found at 2010 and tested by test, pits and test trench in 2011 and 2014. a result of exploring works the presence offour cultural horiz...
Article
Full-text available
Primary reduction techniques used at the site of Kara-Bom in the Altai Mountains, are analyzed using the refitting method. In previous studies, the Kara-Bom assemblages provided the basis for reconstructing the evolution of lithic industries in the Altai Mountains over most of the Middle Paleolithic and at the early stages of the Upper Paleolithic...
Article
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35 000–42 000 лет назад. Тем самым комплекс Кара-Тенеша должен быть отнесен к пластинчатому начальному верхнему палеолиту. Призматический метод (в однонаправленном и бипродольном вариан-тах), выявленный на основе ремонтажа, был реализо-ван во время средней стадии расщепления нуклеуса. Выявленный нами круг аналогий позволяет ут-верждать, что призмат...
Article
According to a traditional point of view, the flake, blade and point are regarded as resulted blanks for the Levallois technology. However, there are no well-established criteria for determining Levallois blades in Siberia and the northern part of Central Asia. This category is likely to be a core trimming element in flake and point production or m...
Article
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The paper deals with the products of the Levallois convergent unidirectional technology, namely the points with the Y-arete pattern, coming from the Palaeolithic sites of Siberia and Central Asia. The unidirectional Levallois points appear to be indicative of the presence of a particular specialized technology. Three distribution areas of the typic...
Article
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This paper explores the modes of dispersal, variability, and chronology of the Initial Upper Paleolithic (IUP) of Southern Siberia and the northern Central Asia. Several types of tool-markers, a peculiar type of reduction technology and two types of adornments, specific to the area under study, are distinguished. Based on current data, the author c...
Article
Full-text available
Based on regularly retouched tools recovered from the Early Upper Paleolithic Tolbor-4 and Tolbor-15 sites in the Khangai Mountains of northern Mongolia, we reconstruct the development of cores from large bidirectional forms for the production of elongated blades to flat unidirectional and orthogonal nuclei. Blanks also became progressively smaller...