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Evgeny Yurievich Girya

Evgeny Yurievich Girya
Institute for the History of Material Culture, Russian Academy of Sciences house 18, Dvortsovaya Embankment, Saint Petersburg, 191186, Russian Federation

About

32
Publications
11,109
Reads
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388
Citations
Citations since 2017
14 Research Items
176 Citations
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Introduction
Evgeny Yurievich Girya currently works at the experimental-traceologycal department, Russian Academy of Sciences. Evgeny does research in Historical Anthropology, Cultural Anthropology and Archaeology. Their most recent publication is 'Provenancing the first obsidian artefact discovered in Belarus'.
Additional affiliations
August 1984 - present
Russian Academy of Sciences
Position
  • Senior Researcher

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
Full-text available
В статье рассматриваются три обработанные окаменевшие кости морских животных миоценового возраста, обнаруженные в разные годы, но в одних стратиграфических и планиграфических условиях на раннепалеолитической стоянке Богатыри/Синяя Балка на северном побережье Таманского п-ова. Приводится информация о возрасте, стратиграфии и планиграфии каменной инд...
Article
Full-text available
We describe three processed fossilized bones of sea mammals of the Miocene age, discovered in various years, but in similar stratigraphic and planigraphic contexts, at the Early Paleolithic site Bogatyri/Sinyaya Balka, on the northern coast of the Taman Peninsula. We provide information on the age, stratigraphy, and planigraphy of the site, interpr...
Article
Layer II of Kostenki 17 has yielded one of the earliest Upper Palaeolithic assemblages in Eastern Europe. In addition to lithic and bone implements, the collection includes numerous ornaments with perforated holes made from fox teeth, petrified remains and soft stones. This collection of ornaments is unique in both the variety of raw materials and...
Article
Full-text available
In the Late Mesolithic graves of Yuzhniy Oleniy Ostrov, Northwest Russia, large amounts of Eurasian elk (Alces alces) incisors have been found. These teeth, for the most part fashioned into portable pendants, seem to have formed decorative sets for the garments or accessories of the deceased. This article examines both the technologies associated w...
Article
Full-text available
More than 4300 Eurasian elk (Alces alces) incisors, most of them pendants, were found in 84 burials in the Late Mesolithic cemetery of Yuzhniy Oleniy Ostrov, Northwest Russia. We analysed the manufacture techniques of elk teeth (4014), in the collection of the Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography, St Petersburg. A striking observa...
Article
Full-text available
The study focuses on postmortem trepanations of crania from the Early Tes’ (late first millennium BC) burial vaults in the Minusinsk Basin, Southern Siberia. The authors present the results of traceological analysis of more than 140 crania and data on the location, position, shape and size of openings, and trepanation techniques. Judging by the tra...
Article
Full-text available
The paper discusses new trends emerging in traceology and related to the study of a broader range of artifacts made of different materials: from impact-marks on rock surfaces to wooden sledge runners. The authors provide a number of examples when the use of modern equipment allows to tackle new traceological questions more effectively. In particula...
Article
Full-text available
Geochemical analysis of the first obsidian artefact discovered in Belarus reveals its source to be the Trans-Caucasus, rather than the expected Carpathian source for prehistoric obsidian in Eastern Europe.
Article
Full-text available
The paper deals with the preliminary results of the realization a salvage archaeology project connected with the construction of the railway from Kyzyl to Kuragino (Krasnoyarsk Region, South Siberia) in 2012 and 2015. During the exploration of the multicomponent habitation site of Irba 2 the Pleistocene remains were unearthed beneath the Holocene c...
Article
Full-text available
Tooth pendants of European elk, Eurasian beaver and brown bear are the most common artefact type in graves at Late Mesolithic Yuzhniy Oleniy Ostrov on Lake Onega, northwestern Russia. In one burial of a 20-35-year-old woman, 18 fragments of wild boar tooth pendants from at least five individuals were found. Wild boar was not a regular part of local...
Article
Full-text available
The Horokazawa site locality Toma (HT) is an Upper Paleolithic archeological site situated on a hillside near the Shirataki Akaishiyama obsidian source area, the largest in Japan. Excavations at HT over a period of more than 20 years have produced more than 570,000 artifacts from an area of less than 100 m2. The Horokazawa Toma lithic assemblage wa...
Article
The paper presents and discusses the results of the experimental-traceological schools-seminars, conducted in 2012-2013 at the "Lost World" Ethnographic-Archaeological Park (Rostov Oblast of Russia). A special emphasis is laid on the high efficiency of modern technologies of macro and micro images demonstration. The possibility of simultaneous and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Археологические местонахождения на Раучуа-Чаунской низменности. Западная Чукотка
Article
A fragment of a metatarsal of an extinct camel with chop marks found in the lower horizon of the Khapry alluvium on the Lower Don is described. The analysis demonstrated that the marks were left by a single tool with a robust and sharp edge (either a chopper or a large fl ake) during the butchering of a camel carcass. The animal belonged to the spe...
Article
Full-text available
The place of the Chertov Ovrag (or Devil's Gorge) site on Wrangel Island, Chukotka, among archaeological cultures of the Arctic has remained unclear from the moment of N. N. Dikov's discovery of the site in 1975. In 2000 we carried out a small project at Chertov Ovrag. The materials obtained permit proposing a slightly different interpretation of t...
Article
Full-text available
A newly discovered Paleolithic site on the Yana River, Siberia, at 71 degrees N, lies well above the Arctic circle and dates to 27,000 radiocarbon years before present, during glacial times. This age is twice that of other known human occupations in any Arctic region. Artifacts at the site include a rare rhinoceros foreshaft, other mammoth foreshaf...
Article
Full-text available
Technological analysis of Eastern Gravettian blade technology

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