Eve Limbrick-Oldfield

Eve Limbrick-Oldfield
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC ·  Department of Psychology

PhD

About

22
Publications
2,740
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362
Citations
Introduction
I completed my PhD in clinical sciences (psychology) in 2012. Since then I have been working as a postdoctoral researcher investigating the psychology of gambling disorder. I would now like to broaden my skill set outside of the academic sphere. I have a passion for statistics and problem solving, and am looking for an opportunity to use this skill set in a practical way that is of benefit to society. Key skills -Experimental design and statistical analysis, leading the way in applying complex statistical models in novel settings. (SAS, R, SPPS, Matlab, Python, Shell scripting) - Breadth of experimental experience investigating human behaviour, including survey, behavioural, and brain imaging data. - Administration of large research grants, including working with large and diverse team
Additional affiliations
February 2012 - July 2015
University of Cambridge
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (22)
Preprint
The incentive sensitization theory of addiction proposes that through repeated associations with addictive rewards, addiction-related stimuli acquire a disproportionately powerful motivational pull on behaviour. Animal research suggests trait-like individual variation in the degree of incentive salience attribution to reward-predictive cues, define...
Article
Full-text available
Advances in cashless technologies create a dilemma for gambling regulators. Research indicates that cash purchases entail a ‘pain of paying’ that is attenuated with more abstract forms of payment, yet limited research has directly tested the impact of mode of payment on gambling behavior. Across two experiments, community-recruited gamblers were ra...
Article
Background and aims Individuals with gambling disorder display increased levels of risk-taking, but it is not known if it is associated with an altered subjective valuation of gains and/or losses, perception of their probabilities, or integration of these sources of information into expected value. Methods Participants with gambling disorder ( n =...
Article
Full-text available
Rationale Gambling and alcohol use are recreational behaviours that share substantial commonalities at a phenomenological, clinical and neurobiological level. Past studies have shown that alcohol can have a disinhibiting effect on gambling behaviour, in terms of bet size and persistence. Objectives This study was conducted in order to characterise...
Article
Background and aims: Immersion during slot machine gambling has been linked to disordered gambling. Current conceptualizations of immersion (namely dissociation, flow, and the machine zone) make contrasting predictions as to whether gamblers are captivated by the game per se ('zoned in') or motivated by the escape that immersion provides ('zoned o...
Article
Psychological and neurobiological markers in individuals with gambling disorder (GD) could reflect transdiagnostic vulnerability to addiction or neuroadaptive consequences of long-term gambling. Using an endophenotypic approach to identify vulnerability markers, we tested the biological relatives of cases with GD. Male participants seeking treatmen...
Article
Gambling has longstanding links with excitement and physiological arousal, but prior research has not considered (a) gamblers’ ability to detect internal physiological signals, or (b) markers of parasympathetic functioning. The present study measured interoception in individuals with gambling disorder, using self‐report measures and a heartbeat cou...
Article
Full-text available
Neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC) play central roles in reward‐related behaviours. Non‐human animal studies suggest that these neurons also process aversive events. However, our understanding of how the human VTA and SNC responds to such events is limited and has been hindered by the technical chal...
Article
Stopping devices are a structural characteristic of modern slot machines that enable the player to brake the spinning reels manually, but with no influence on the predetermined outcome. This study tested two mechanisms for why players might use a stopping device: (1) enhanced ‘illusory control’, and (2) faster game speed. Thirty student participant...
Article
Full-text available
Cue reactivity is an established procedure in addictions research for examining the subjective experience and neural basis of craving. This experiment sought to quantify cue-related brain responses in gambling disorder using personally tailored cues in conjunction with subjective craving, as well as a comparison with appetitive non-gambling stimuli...
Article
Full-text available
Cue reactivity is an established procedure in addictions research for examining the subjective experience and neural basis of craving. This experiment sought to quantify cue-related brain responses in Gambling Disorder using personally tailored cues in conjunction with subjective craving, as well as a comparison with appetitive non-gambling stimuli...
Article
Full-text available
Illusory control refers to an effect in games of chance where features associated with skilful situations increase expectancies of success. Past work has operationalized illusory control in terms of subjective ratings or behaviour, with limited consideration of the relationship between these definitions, or the broader construct of agency. This stu...
Article
Illusory control refers to an effect in games of chance where features associated with skilful situations increase expectancies of success. Past work has operationalised illusory control in terms of subjective ratings or behaviour, with limited consideration of the relationship between these definitions, or the broader construct of agency. This stu...
Article
Full-text available
Human choice under uncertainty is influenced by erroneous beliefs about randomness. In simple binary choice tasks, such as red/black predictions in roulette, long outcome runs (e.g. red, red, red) typically increase the tendency to predict the other outcome (i.e. black), an effect labeled the “gambler’s fallacy.” In these settings, participants may...
Article
Full-text available
![Figure][1] We have all experienced coincidences or rare events that we find difficult to believe. Throughout history, people have tried to find an explanation for the occurrence of such events, and these have often taken a supernatural form. For example, people have provided explanations
Article
Full-text available
The spatiotemporal profile of activation of the prefrontal cortex in verbal and non-verbal recognition memory was examined using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Sixteen neurologically healthy right-handed participants were scanned whilst carrying out a modified version of the Doors and People Test of recognition memory. A pattern of significant prefr...
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Full-text available
Alterations in appetitive processing are central to the major psychological theories of addiction, with differential predictions made by the reward deficiency, incentive salience, and impulsivity hypotheses. Functional MRI has become the chief means of testing these predictions, with experiments reliably highlighting disturbances at the level of th...
Article
Developments in psychiatry have ratified the existence of behavioral addictions, that certain activities such as gambling or video-game play may be considered addictive in the absence of exogenous (i.e. drug-induced) stimulation of brain reinforcement circuitry. This article describes recent advances in understanding the neurobiological basis of be...
Data
The MRI acquisition parameters for the functional EPI, whole-brain EPI and structural T2 scans.
Article
Full-text available
Localising activity in the human midbrain with conventional functional MRI (fMRI) is challenging because the midbrain nuclei are small and located in an area that is prone to physiological artefacts. Here we present a replicable and automated method to improve the detection and localisation of midbrain fMRI signals. We designed a visual fMRI task t...

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